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Old 06-03-2015, 06:12 PM   #1
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Golden Fuel Systems only uses one filter?

I've found a used Golden Fuel Systems setup on Craigslist for $500. Upon researching their system it seems that they just use one 2 micron canister type filter. The system is designed for on-road filtering with a 2 chambered heated tank. It seems to me like the filter would clog up pretty instantly, even with running the dirty oil through a sock filter on its way into the dirty half of the tank. Does anyone use a GFS setup on their bus? How often do you have to change your filter?
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Old 06-03-2015, 06:40 PM   #2
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I think you would be better off with a centrifuge type setup with a 2 micron filter for a final filter unless you plan on buying filters by the truckload.
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Old 06-03-2015, 09:27 PM   #3
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I'll be filtering while driving, and don't have the space to mess with it inside the bus. I looked at centrifuge but it's too expensive for something that isn't exactly what I'm looking for. My original plan was to have a series of three filter housings with the bag-type changeable filters; 20 micron nominal, 10 micron nominal, and 5 micron absolute. Those kind of filters are very cheap, and I'd buy in bulk to have them always on hand. I'm thinking that if it's worth it I'll buy this Golden Fuel Systems setup and add 1 or 2 of these kind of filters before their 2 micron canister type. I don't like the canister style. Too expensive and too much to throw away.
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Old 06-04-2015, 12:30 PM   #4
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What sort of centrifuge did you look at? There are the huge, free-standing ones that have the rotor driven directly by an electric motor and there are the oil-pressure based ones. These oil pressure style centrifuges are sometimes used under the hood for filtering the motor oil while driving (could be used for WVO in the same way). You'll need an additional pump to get the pressure up. Another power steering pump would do the job.



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Old 06-04-2015, 01:04 PM   #5
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Quote:
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What sort of centrifuge did you look at? There are the huge, free-standing ones that have the rotor driven directly by an electric motor and there are the oil-pressure based ones. These oil pressure style centrifuges are sometimes used under the hood for filtering the motor oil while driving (could be used for WVO in the same way). You'll need an additional pump to get the pressure up. Another power steering pump would do the job.




This what I was talking about but was lazy to look it up.
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Old 06-04-2015, 03:41 PM   #6
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I saw those on ebay but I have never heard of anyone using them and wasn't sure if it would do the trick. If I could see reviews of people who had used them for onboard WVO filtration I'd definitely look into it more seriously.
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Old 06-05-2015, 01:55 AM   #7
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I used the OC-25 centrifuge for engine oil filtering in an old 1985 Mercedes station wagon. It worked obnoxiously well at removing carbon. The station wagon since died, but the OC-25 is going to be going on the bus.
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Old 06-05-2015, 08:57 AM   #8
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I've heard that a Luberfiner filter housing with a Harvard filter will keep oil
clean enough that it never needs changing. The large Luberfiner will hold a
gallon of oil by its self.
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Old 06-05-2015, 10:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onenationundergoat View Post
I saw those on ebay but I have never heard of anyone using them and wasn't sure if it would do the trick. If I could see reviews of people who had used them for onboard WVO filtration I'd definitely look into it more seriously.
Videos from PaBioDiesel show it working with WVO on a 55 gallon drum. There's no reason why you can't modify their setup to work with a fuel tank. I'll be doing that when the time comes. It's a small system. All you need is a pump (I'll be using a power steering pump, likely), a way to warm the WVO (plate heat exchange with hot antifreeze running through it) before it hits the pump and the centrifuge.

The especially appealing part of using a centrifuge vs filters is that you can clean out the centrifuge any time instead of carrying an arse load of filters. You can clean the centrifuge with a couple paper towels. No reliance on a source of filters. WVO filtering on the road requires many, many filters of all sorts of microns since you won't have time to let the WVO settle. You'll be swapping them out every 500 miles (estimate based on my brothers experience with doing the same thing on his wee VW Jetta).

A centrifuge also acts as a water separater.
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Old 06-05-2015, 08:07 PM   #10
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Ok cool. I'm sold on the idea. So here's the plan:
1. Buy Golden Fuel Systems kit used for $500
2. Connect another 100gallon heated tank
3. install centrifuge between the tank and GFS kit.

Waste oil will be filtered to 55 microns on its way into the 100 gallon tank. This tank is heated with a flat plate heat exchanger and has a fuel pump that goes to the centrifuge. From the centrifuge it goes into the GFS tank which is heated and sends it through a 2 micron aquabloc filter, then sent through a coolant heated fuel line to the engine, and the rest of the system is the stock GFS trekker style. We're keeping our 60 gal original diesel tank, so our total WVO+diesel capacity will be 220 gallons. That's a long way between stops!
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