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Old 07-12-2006, 10:17 PM   #11
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personally i'd stay away from oil that gets solid at room temperature. When it solidifies in the fuel lines, it takes a lot of driving (and sometimes a propane torch) to melt the solid material back into nice liquidy oil.

My aux coolant pump on the ford was from the factory and under the hood. You may or may not have one. MY new bus, the international, did not come with one, but after adding a pair of heater cores in the coolant circuit an aux pump was necessary for proper flow.

I filter my oil using hosehold water filters that are rated at 20 micron. The other micron rated filters do not appear to be made of the same material, and i've had the greatest success with the 20's. You can buy them at wal-mart, home-depot, tractor supply and about any hardware. They're about 2 or 3 bucks each. After the oil is filtered, i run it through the bus' stock fuel filter before it goes into the engine. I have no idea the micron rating for the stock filter, but i think i get about 1,500 miles out of the filter before it gets plugged up. Always carry a spare! Having an aux fuel pump in the diesel fuel line will make filter changes a snap. Not to mention those times when you run out of veggie, or veggie stopps flowing for whatever reason.

The difference between having the 12 volt diesel pump is this: Flip a switch to turn on the diesel fuel pump when the engine begins to die, wait a few seconds and drive on down the highway.....

or without the aux pump. when the engine begines to die, turn on yoru 4 way flashers, pull onto the shoulder, coast to a stop, get out your 3/4" wrench so you can crack an injector, use the hand primer to prime the system, turn the key, let the bus run for a few seconds before it stalls again, then repeat the priming process a couple more times until fuel sprays out of hte cracked injector (while the eingine is runnin). Shut the engine down, tighten the injector, close the hood, and take off again.

For $35 and a couple hours work you can install the aux pump. Well worht the effort. Nothing impresses your friends more than sitting along the highway with your hood open trying to prime the fuel system in the middle of the nite!
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Old 07-13-2006, 12:56 AM   #12
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Hehe...I have only cracked an injector once to see if fuel was coming out (which it wasn't). After I pumped mine up, I let it backdrain through the air purge on the filters. Did your 6.6 not have this? Also...I'm fairly well convinced my bus doesn't have the aux. coolant pump although it's just about impossible to tell with all the hacking thats been done on that system over the years
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Old 07-21-2006, 08:50 PM   #13
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Ok....so I've done lots of research, thermodynamic calculations, etc lately in deciding what to do. I want to make my 4000 mile cross country journey across the country before school starts up again a reality, but the only way it's going to happen is on WVO.

Here's what I came up with...in terms of making my own heat exchanger, using exhaust gases to heat the oil was far and away the best method in terms of getting up to temp in a reasonable amount of time and getting HOT. However, flexible copper is up over $1.00 per foot right now. Hydronic baseboard heaters run about $10 per foot right now. Tranny coolers with enough surface area are $50. A-coils from a central air system contain too many plastic parts. Basically, I've decided against building my own heat exchanger. Instead I'm going to buy a flat plate heat exchanger off eBay. The one I found is comparable to the $170 unit we sell at work (it's actually rated slightly higher). I like how compact they are and they are well proven for WVO conversions. The one I plan to buy is listed below.

http://cgi.ebay.com/26-plate-Flat-Pl...QQcmdZViewItem

As for a tank....again I've been wrestling, but I think I'm just going to buy a new poly tank and avoid all the headaches. I can get either a 35 gallon or a 65 gallons from work for $75 or $135 respectively. They are similar to this one. http://cgi.ebay.com/35-Gallon-Horizo...QQcmdZViewItem

They are heat and chemical resistant. The only problem is that they only have one NPT fitting on them for the supply. I will have to drill and install a return line fitting. The cool thing is that the supply fitting is an inch or two above the bottom of the tank allowing for some settling room. I'm not sure which tank I will go with. The 65 gallon tank has the obvious advantage of not requiring filling up as often, but the 35 gallon will take up far less space and since it will be in the living room behind my seat, that's something to look at. Either way it will be enclosed and have a bench or something on top of it. The size of the tank really doesn't matter in terms of heating has the heating will be done downstream in the heat exchanger.

For valves I'm going to go with the 1/4 turn brass valves. I can get them cheap at work...much cheaper than the $75 Pollack electric valve. I just don't trust anything electronic plus they will allow me to prevent any WVO from returning to the diesel tank, as little as it might have been.

I haven't decided on hose yet. The clear vinyl "beer bong" hose is cheapest and is pressure rated for much more than this system will ever see, but the hot oil will be at the upper end of it's thermal ratings at the given pressure so I'm not sure about that. Rubber fuel hose is much more stout and runs $.70 per foot for 3/8ths, the biggest we carry where I work. Copper is probably the most stout option and allows heating with a torch if all else fails, but is prohibitively expensive right now. We just underwent another price change on it this week.

I have yet to find an appropriate pump for priming, etc. I might just try and see if I can get it to work without it. If I can't get it to run well without it I'll sink some money into a pump. No big deal...I guess. We used to have a neat little pump that chucked into a drill where I work, but we have since changed suppliers and can't get it anymore. Oh well I guess.

For filtering I think I will use a hand pump through a 20 micron fuel filter/water seperater and a 10 micron finishing filter. We sell both of these for cheap and the Goldenrod brand is common enough to not have a problem. They are cheaper than the water filter method and are designed for this purpose locally. I think I may try and figure out a gravity feed system so that when we park and go out and about it can do the work for me as I know we cannot haul anywhere near enough WVO with us on this trip. Even with a 55 gallons drum where the shower will eventually be and the 35 gallon tank full we will only be running 720 miles or so on WVO. Obviously fill ups anywhere possible along the way will be necessary. Thankfully we're never in a rush to get anywhere.

The only problem that REALLY remains is getting it all installed and tested in the next 3 weeks. I also need to come up with as much GOOD veggie oil as possible which may be a little more difficult. Most of the oil around here is partially hydrogenated. It's "liquid" at room temp, but not all THAT "liquid." Perhaps I'll be trying the naptha trick anyway. Either eay I'm going to have a big bottle of cetane boost, injector cleaner, and some spare fuel filters with me. Any thoughts before I proceed as planned?
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Old 07-31-2006, 12:34 AM   #14
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Ok....I got the boost leak fixed on the bus and my phantom air leak on the brakes is gone....maybe it was just a sticking diaphragm.....I dunno.

I figured out where I want to put my lines I think. I finally found my Racor thermocoil....on a framerail way far back so so much for using that as supplemental fuel heat. I don't even know if the thing works to be perfectly honest.

I think the heat exchanger will mount nicely on the firewall on the door side. I will then use the heater lines going through the firewall there as my tap into the cooling system. They are only about 3 feet from the thermostat housing and get plenty warm though I still think I might be using the weather front in the dead of summer to get enough heat from my motor

I'm going to tie into the supply line on the firewall as well. There is an aftermarket filter assembly there that I will T into on the discharge side because it is not rated for heated fuel. In fact, it sternly warns against running heated fuel through it. I will still have the two factory filters in place for the WVO, however. This should allow my lift pump to draw the fuel though I will leave plenty of space for a pump should I need it.

As for the return lines....this is where I might need a little help, Jason. I traced the lines back to the IP as there are a ton of steel lines running all over. It appears that the steel line coming from just to the right of the primer plunger is about the only realistic place to tie in. This would be ok as it will allow me to "flush" any semi-solid WVO from the return line using diesel if need be. However...there is limited space here to work with. How did you cut the lines, Jason? I plan to use the hose clamp and rubber line method to space my valves out far enough to make them easy to use, but I'm worried about how to cut that thick steel stuff. I'm also worried about bending the fuel line enough without kinking it, but as this is a pressure line and not a suction side, I think I will be ok as the fuel will force what little deformation might occur out of it.

Oh...and I think I'm going to use a 55 gallon barrel as my fuel tank as it is free. That's $75 that can go towards better (read: electric) filtration equipment.

So far so good?
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Old 08-02-2006, 01:20 AM   #15
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Ok....here's my theoretical, soon to be reality system to allow on-the-road filtering. I give up settling (other than in the dumpsters at the restaurants) so I will go through more filters, but for a trip of this magnitude, it becomes necessary.

I also bought my 30 plate heat exchanger last night.

http://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/the_ex...e2.jpg&.src=ph[/url]
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Old 08-02-2006, 01:34 AM   #16
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steel fuel lines are pretty difficult to bend. My suggestion would be to cut out a small section of the return line so you have room to attach rubber lines. A hacksaw if you have room works quite well for cutting steel fuel lines. A sawzall also work well if you use a blade with a lot of tpi.

There's not much danger of a spark igniting the fuel, since diesel fuels ignition temperature is well above 100 degrees. To be safe, you should keep an ABC fire extinguisher handy.
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Old 08-02-2006, 01:36 AM   #17
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I wasn't planning on bending them....hopefully....but where exactly did you tie into the return line? Trying to find a place where there's enough room for easily accessible valves is a bit tricky....
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Old 08-02-2006, 12:58 PM   #18
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you could cut them and attach rubber fuel lines, then mount your valve several inches from the cut in the fuel line.


on my international there was plenty of space to cut and splice

on the ford i made a very poor decision and tried to tap into the thread on the side of the injector pump where the return line is attached. The problem is that it was some crazy thread...something other than npt. It was a dumb thing to do at the time, but i forced an npt fitting into the threads....I don't think i ever got it to stop leaking completely.
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Old 11-23-2009, 11:22 PM   #19
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Re: WVO and WVO blends

The bus will probably run on 100% WVO in warm weather, but for how long? It may seem like it runs fine, but the problem I have heard is that over time you will get coked injectors and rings. Also, you have to wonder if it will shorten the life of your lift pump and injection pump. I don't mess around with blending. It will always be thicker than the fuel is supposed to be. I suggest you stick with a two tank system so you are starting on diesel or biodiesel, and then switching over when the WVO is up to at least 160 degrees. If you do it right, you should be able to switch over after only 5 minutes run time in warm weather, and just a few minutes more in the winter.
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