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Old 05-31-2015, 07:26 AM   #11
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to register you will need a weight slip as well. when i weighed, i was only 18K, plenty legal for a regular class C drivers' license.
dont sweat the small stuff. class c should allow up to 14 passegers, and 26,000 lbs. more than that, and yes you need a cdl.

a recent bill of sale should be all you need for your trip home. imo
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Old 05-31-2015, 08:03 AM   #12
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I'll bet if you think about it, you no someone with a CDL, offer them a few bucks, turn it into a road trip and have some fun. People like to be part of our crazy adventures.
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Old 06-04-2015, 05:25 PM   #13
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Thanks for all the great info everyone. This is very helpful.
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Old 06-04-2015, 05:49 PM   #14
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I don't have a CDL, and I don't plan to get one. Before I start bidding on the bus I want, I'll have someone lined up that does have a CDL to drive it home for me. Two people need to go anyway, because someone has to drive the car back as well.

As far as insurance goes, I think it varies by state, but I'll call Progressive and print a temporary proof card just to get me back home legally. If they cancel the policy for one reason or another, it won't be for a few days at least.
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Old 06-08-2015, 04:48 AM   #15
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I drive a 3/4-ton van, and I have an above-average driving skill with no tickets or at-fault accidents. I also have a strong technical understanding of air-brakes, and diesel engines, and I am comfortable with minor repairs on the road and such. Basically, I'm quite sure I can get this thing home with no problems, as long as nobody gets in my way.

The fact is, however, I will be driving an 84-pass transit bus across multiple states (probably a 2-day trip) with no prior experience, I am not used to tail-swing, or forward-control seating. Therefore, I see the probability of getting in a minor wreck as uncomfortably high.

It's no biggie if I get a ticket, but I do not want to get sued because I bent someone's bumper. As far as licensing, in GA you can get a Class-F license, which basically allows you to drive non-commercial vehicles over 26,000 GVRW. It's easy enough to get. My issue is that a bus technically is commercial as long as there are more than 15 seats in it.

The best solution I can think of is to get myself a Class-F, bring an angle-grinder when I pick the bus up, and cut out all but a couple seats and dump them. I can then tell the insurance company it's non-commercial, and avoid the hassle of obtaining a CDL and commercial insurance.

The title will still say it's commercial until I get the bus home and change it over, but it would fit the criteria of being non-comercial. If I got in a minor accident on the way home, will the insurance company try to drop me due to the official commercial status of the title?

Anyway. Thanks again for all the advice and detailed responses!
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Old 06-08-2015, 07:00 AM   #16
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Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Western North Carolina
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I bet you'd be better at driving it than you think if you're mostly on larger highways...maybe stay in the right lane and just don't go over speed limit. You'll just want to watch out for the bozo who wants to jump into your braking gap...happens in traffic and near exits, me thinks.

Another option to think about...pass the CDL written test (and vision and medical test) to get your learner permit and then hire someone with CDL to go along. You can split the driving time and get valuable experience instead of just riding in your new home. You don't have to pursue the CDL if you don't want it and it only cost $30 or so plus medical certification (perhaps your reg doc would fill it in gratis?).

Perhaps a craigslist ad for an adventurous school bus driver?
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Old 06-08-2015, 07:20 AM   #17
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I concur with everything Seroflorus said and more. When I was lead vehicle training instructor with my last Guard unit, I'd conduct maybe an hour of classroom training (aka Powerpoint and videos), then stick the students behind the wheel and drive out the gate and into *real* traffic. I did this with everything from Humvees to LMTV and 5 ton cargo trucks on loan from the Army Guard, and regardless of rank behind the wheel. And it made my squadron's personnel better drivers because of it, IHMO.
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Old 06-08-2015, 08:44 AM   #18
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Join Date: Dec 2014
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My insurance agent wouldn't insure my bus in a non-commercial policy but they were super sensitive to the idea that it was a private vehicle, so you may be stuck with the commercial policy for now. The insurance agent just wanted pics of the outside and didn't care about # of seats. I'd ask my agent before going through all the effort of cutting out seats if its for no benefit.

Worst case scenario is that your insurance co would not only drop you but refuse to honor any claims...which is where the real risk lies IMO.

Check these guys out for a potential help. http://www.qualitydriveaway.com/php/services.php They *may* even ride with you some if you decide to get the CDL driving permit (which would be good for practice).
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