Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-06-2014, 01:56 AM   #21
Almost There
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 87
Year: 97
Coachwork: Me!
Chassis: BB
Engine: 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 44
Re: Everyone is telling us it's a bad idea...ADVICE?

Sounds like your dad is trying to scare you to stay around and the family is backing him up. 10K for injectors? I wanna be this guys mechanic! Life is short and we only get one shot at it, so do what makes you happy! If it doesn't work out your family will always be there and will welcome you home. As far as the truck, stay away from dealers for starters. Find a vehicle from a private seller and then pay the $ for a pre buy inspection. That way you aren't paying a business so they can keep the lights on you will get an honest opinion on condition from an unbiased mechanic and not the dealers mechanic. Also you will more often than not get a history on the vehicle, most small dealers buy their vehicles at auction and know nothing about them.
Ponyracer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2014, 11:45 AM   #22
Bus Crazy
 
opus's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Montana
Posts: 1,615
Year: 1995
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: All-American R/E
Engine: 8.3 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Re: Everyone is telling us it's a bad idea...ADVICE?

Try for an oil sample too!
opus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-08-2014, 01:38 PM   #23
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Portland, OR.
Posts: 40
Year: 1972
Coachwork: Homemade
Chassis: Crown Supercoach
Engine: Cummins NHH 220, E-F10spd
Re: Everyone is telling us it's a bad idea...ADVICE?

opinions are like assholes, everyones got one. my whole family has been supportive but my fiances family thinks were insane for buying a vintage bus to live in.
yes it can be expensive and yes it can be alot of work but a new roof on a house can be upwards of 10k and what if the foundation needs work?! any sort of home will cost money, but a bus or truck home will take you places.
__________________
Good, Fast, Cheap - Pick any two
Vanopolis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2014, 04:12 AM   #24
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luna_Ulta View Post
We're already in the process of basically trying to sell everything we own that we can't or have no need to take with us. So we're there at least. Just need to find our bus
And we're from northern MI, some cold weather really can't throw us back when we're used to 10 foot drifts We jokingly thought about that when we chose SC; everyone will be off the roads leaving it free for us in a mild storm lol.
Other than leaving family and very few friends behind that we maybe see once to less then that a month, we really don't have much to lose, that's why there isn't anything that can really detour us from our plans.
I absolutely support your dreams. Tell your dad where he can stuff it, and by the way, also tell him I have some injectors for sale, cheap, only 9k. People will always doubt anything outside their comfort zone. It doesn't make it a bad idea. The nomadic life isn't for everyone, and you may very well get sick of it after a while and decide to put down some roots again.

However in the meantime you can save up money by living in your small home, see a ton of new places and meet a lot of interesting (maybe even good) people. Bottom line, if you never go for that adventure, you'll end up regretting you didn't. And in your travels you might come across a place you absolutely fall in love with. Save up and keep your eyes out, you might score some great land for cheap, its easy to do in todays economy.

As far as the conversion, I'd say let it happen organically. By living in the space for a while you'll start to see patterns in your traffic. Things will naturally come together if you allow yourself time to think it through. Start off with a bed and a camp stove (or whatever you already have) and go from there. Throw down some painters tape for imaginary walls and see if you can live with the layout or if they're always in the way. Living in a small space takes a ton of planning, better to do this before you start making saw cuts.

Watch craigslist and freecycle for things people are just throwing away. You'd be amazed what you can come up on if you're patient and diligent about looking. People throw away beautiful usable old-growth wood all the time, its sickening. RV's very commonly sit in peoples driveway and rot in the sun and rain until they are junked out. This means appliances, holding tanks, furnishings, etc which have barely been used can all be sourced for free or cheap if you keep your eyes open. One of the design principles I plan to follow is trying to source everything I can reclaimed. Its not just a cost issue, but one of ecological responsibility. Why fill up our landfills with stuff I'm about to go out and buy. Sure it takes more work and time than just hopping on amazon or walking into walmart, but it builds character. Both for yourself and your project.

I built and lived in a 24x16' cabin for several years. The bathroom was 5x5'. However everything was laid out very well, with modularity in mind and I never felt cramped (except a few times when we had 10+ people there lol.) Living in a small footprint allows you to put a lot of thought into every little detail, and encourages you to ACTUALLY GO OUTSIDE!

Ditch the stickframe house in suburbia and ditch all the monotony that goes with it. Most people grind out 40+ hours a week working a job they cant stand for a boss they hate just so they can barely keep up with their bills on crap they don't even own. AND THEY'RE PROUD OF IT! They'll rub it in your face and try to say you're crazy for not being "normal." As it turns out, humans have been nomadic for a long time. We are hunter/gatherers at heart, its only because of modernization and mechanized agriculture we've allowed ourselves to stagnate. And look what its brought us. Our country is in a steady decline, some might say freefall, and we've still got it better than a lot of the rest of the world.

Live your dream, dont let anyone stop you. And most importantly, tell people about it and how it enriches your life. Consider yourself fortunate to have a significant other to share the experience with you, most modern women wouldn't dream of leaving their dishwashers and hair straighteners behind.
__________________
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/showthread.php?t=9883 - 7.3L 4x4 Shuttle Bus Toyhauler conversion
headinthetrees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2014, 10:12 PM   #25
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Florida
Posts: 584
Year: 1988
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: I.H.
Engine: DT360
It sure sounds like you spent time visiting Dancing Rabbit. It is an eco-village. They have a website and it will be on our plan list when our bus is ready to hit the road!

Quote:
Originally Posted by headinthetrees View Post
I absolutely support your dreams...
in your travels you might come across a place you absolutely fall in love with. Save up and keep your eyes out, you might score some great land for cheap, its easy to do in todays economy.

As far as the conversion, I'd say let it happen organically. By living in the space for a while you'll start to see patterns in your traffic. Things will naturally come together if you allow yourself time to think it through. Start off with a bed and a camp stove (or whatever you already have) and go from there...

Watch craigslist and freecycle for things people are just throwing away. You'd be amazed what you can come up on if you're patient and diligent about looking. People throw away beautiful usable old-growth wood all the time, its sickening. RV's very commonly sit in peoples driveway and rot in the sun and rain until they are junked out. This means appliances, holding tanks, furnishings, etc which have barely been used can all be sourced for free or cheap if you keep your eyes open. One of the design principles I plan to follow is trying to source everything I can reclaimed. Its not just a cost issue, but one of ecological responsibility. Why fill up our landfills with stuff I'm about to go out and buy. Sure it takes more work and time than just hopping on amazon or walking into walmart, but it builds character. Both for yourself and your project.

I built and lived in a 24x16' cabin for several years. The bathroom was 5x5'. However everything was laid out very well, with modularity in mind and I never felt cramped (except a few times when we had 10+ people there lol.) Living in a small footprint allows you to put a lot of thought into every little detail, and encourages you to ACTUALLY GO OUTSIDE!

Ditch the stickframe house in suburbia and ditch all the monotony that goes with it. Most people grind out 40+ hours a week working a job they cant stand for a boss they hate just so they can barely keep up with their bills on crap they don't even own. AND THEY'RE PROUD OF IT! They'll rub it in your face and try to say you're crazy for not being "normal." As it turns out, humans have been nomadic for a long time. We are hunter/gatherers at heart, its only because of modernization and mechanized agriculture we've allowed ourselves to stagnate. And look what its brought us. Our country is in a steady decline, some might say freefall, and we've still got it better than a lot of the rest of the world.

Live your dream, dont let anyone stop you. And most importantly, tell people about it and how it enriches your life. Consider yourself fortunate to have a significant other to share the experience with you, most modern women wouldn't dream of leaving their dishwashers and hair straighteners behind.
HolyBus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2014, 10:51 PM   #26
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by HolyBus View Post
It sure sounds like you spent time visiting Dancing Rabbit. It is an eco-village. They have a website and it will be on our plan list when our bus is ready to hit the road!
Nope, I'd like to though... Been subscribed to their newsletter for at least 3-4 years now and watched them progress. I've been in contact with a few other intentional communities out west, and once I get my bus ready I'll be visiting a few of them. I'd like to film the various things going on and eventually put together a documentary on permaculture and intentional communities.
__________________
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/showthread.php?t=9883 - 7.3L 4x4 Shuttle Bus Toyhauler conversion
headinthetrees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2014, 04:41 AM   #27
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 12,107
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Ward/AmTran
Chassis: International
Engine: dt466
Rated Cap: 78
Quote:
Originally Posted by headinthetrees View Post
Nope, I'd like to though... Been subscribed to their newsletter for at least 3-4 years now and watched them progress. I've been in contact with a few other intentional communities out west, and once I get my bus ready I'll be visiting a few of them. I'd like to film the various things going on and eventually put together a documentary on permaculture and intentional communities.
This is an interesting subject.
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2014, 07:14 AM   #28
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 546
Quote:
Originally Posted by headinthetrees View Post
Nope, I'd like to though... Been subscribed to their newsletter for at least 3-4 years now and watched them progress. I've been in contact with a few other intentional communities out west, and once I get my bus ready I'll be visiting a few of them. I'd like to film the various things going on and eventually put together a documentary on permaculture and intentional communities.
Arcosanti, AZ.
__________________
Don and Mary
dond is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2014, 11:49 AM   #29
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 170
Quote:
Originally Posted by dond View Post
Arcosanti, AZ.
50,000 visitors a year?! How have I not heard of this place already? I'll definitely put it on my list of places to go see. I have a feeling the hardest part about making this documentary will be deciding what actually makes the final cut. There's going to be so much awesome information it'll be tough to press it down to less than 90 minutes.
__________________
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/showthread.php?t=9883 - 7.3L 4x4 Shuttle Bus Toyhauler conversion
headinthetrees is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-22-2015, 01:39 PM   #30
Mini-Skoolie
 
jenna1969's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Lancaster County, PA.
Posts: 23
I feel we're in the same boat too. Taxes going up in the city we live in now. Just too expensive to keep a real house anymore. We just want to throw in the towel with house living at least for a few years. We need to stay local and keep our jobs but converting a bus to live in with our 2 young children, seems hard to fathom considering where would we keep the bus to work on it and keep it parked to live out of when we're not camping or travelling?
jenna1969 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
I need help? Any idea shortbusshorty Titles, Insurance, Registration and Money Matters 1 12-30-2011 05:13 AM
Anyone have an idea of value for BB All American? phillbus914 Conversion General Discussions 13 03-27-2009 01:01 AM
New to the bus conversion idea KC10Chief Everything Else | General Skoolie Discussions 13 05-07-2008 09:32 AM
Skoolie Idea bgrimm05 Conversion General Discussions 25 10-23-2007 06:45 PM
Air Idea phillip266 Conversion General Discussions 16 02-05-2005 11:42 PM

» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:45 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.