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Old 10-15-2017, 03:58 PM   #2681
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
when I was doing gasser stuff I always kept the ignition unolugged and cranked for a bit to see oil pressure before I let it start..

the ONE diesel I rebuilt had a uel solenoid so I left it unplugged and cranked.. then plugged it in, fired it up, turned on the A/C (cause it was a 90 degree july night in a barn.. ).. then drove it like I stole it..
-Christopher
Anybody remember the drill in the distributor hole to prime the oil pump??? Cut-off distributor drive shaft chucked in 1/2" drill worked great.

With diesels, it's a scrap of plywood at the ready to cover inlet and starve air to kill runnaways. Don't use a shop rag and destroy the turbo.
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Old 10-15-2017, 06:34 PM   #2682
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indeed I still have my sawed off distributor in my tool box!. id run that and would still crank before I tried to fire it.

never though about a runaway.. if I ever rebuild one of my diesels ill keep a capper handy to kill it..

I was told if I incurred a runaway in my own engine for real that I could stop the engine by spraying the fire extuingisher into the intake.. not sure how true that is.. hopefully i never have a runaway..
-Christopher
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:14 PM   #2683
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Guys like Smokey Yunick don't come around every day.
GW
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Old 10-15-2017, 09:45 PM   #2684
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Yeah...a runaway diesel is a scary thing (plenty of YouTube videos on the subject) --- And Roger not using a rag. I have heard horror stories of hands hands & fingers coming out the exhaust. Kinda' like being sucked into a jet intake (Had a Navy buddy who actually survived that experience on an F8 Crusader, but he was on in 10,000). Most don't.

And I have been told the same about using a CO2 extinguisher as it displaces the oxygen needed for detonation in the cylinders. Might be worth a try. Certainly safer than a rag and a hand. I have thought about building an air shutoff using an RV black tank valve in the intake. Might just work...we'll see. They make fancy cutoffs but they are crazy expensive and look just like the tank valve. A diesel only needs fuel & air. Cut off either and they will not continue to run. Let's just hope none of us ever needs to resort to such a trial.
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Old 10-15-2017, 10:23 PM   #2685
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I have thought about building an air shutoff using an RV black tank valve in the intake. Might just work...we'll see. They make fancy cutoffs but they are crazy expensive and look just like the tank valve. A diesel only needs fuel & air. Cut off either and they will not continue to run. Let's just hope none of us ever needs to resort to such a trial.
You gave me good idea - Blast gate from dust collector is cheap-



blast gate.jpg
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Old 10-15-2017, 10:36 PM   #2686
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Dang...that looks right to me. And metal instead of plastic. Tell us more!?
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Old 10-15-2017, 11:29 PM   #2687
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Dang...that looks right to me. And metal instead of plastic. Tell us more!?
Not much to say- opens and closes quick. Link

Screen Shot 2017-10-15 at 10.28.38 PM.png
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Old 10-16-2017, 07:05 AM   #2688
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what os the most typical cause of a runaway? major engine internal issues allowing oil into the cylinders or a busted turbo?

whats the realisic chances of saving an engine that runs away? im assuming you are just driving down the road.. see clouds of smoke, cant slow it down , so you stop.. open the hood, apply whatever stop procedure you opt for.. have you by that time revved it so high you wasted all the valves? or are most diesels non interference and will just RPM up to the point of valve float where the compression goes away and becomes its own "rev limiter"? till you can get the air cut..
-Christopher
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Old 10-16-2017, 09:50 AM   #2689
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All stationary oilfield diesel engines are required to have an emergency shutdown system. And since diesels can (and do) run wild on their own oil supply, they rely on shutting off the air supply using a device in the intake that looks just like what Rusty posted. They will typically be installed with a remote cable to actuate the gate and/or an automatic system to shut it.

A diesel is happy with almost any fuel supply including it's own oil but can also feed on anything in the atmosphere. In the case of oilfield equipment, natural gas and methane are common so they have these devices to close off the intake and shut them down. An 1100ci 16 cylinder Detroit can do a lot of damage if it speeds up and goes boom.

An over-the-road engine can do the same so an emergency shut down device is an excellent piece of insurance. A simple cable mechanism in the cockpit can be arranged to close such a device.
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Old 10-16-2017, 10:45 AM   #2690
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All stationary oilfield diesel engines are required to have an emergency shutdown system. And since diesels can (and do) run wild on their own oil supply, they rely on shutting off the air supply using a device in the intake that looks just like what Rusty posted. They will typically be installed with a remote cable to actuate the gate and/or an automatic system to shut it.

A diesel is happy with almost any fuel supply including it's own oil but can also feed on anything in the atmosphere. In the case of oilfield equipment, natural gas and methane are common so they have these devices to close off the intake and shut them down. An 1100ci 16 cylinder Detroit can do a lot of damage if it speeds up and goes boom.

An over-the-road engine can do the same so an emergency shut down device is an excellent piece of insurance. A simple cable mechanism in the cockpit can be arranged to close such a device.
sure does seem like a good device to have.. esp on us that have older engines and turbos.. seems like if a turbo bearing lets go it dumps a lot of oil somewhere and often the turbo itself doesnt fly apart so the engine isnt damage from the failure but would be from the oil burn..

-Christopher
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