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Old 04-11-2015, 09:27 AM   #921
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She should definitely be road ready by summer. Just not sure what century, let alone year. It all depends on how the state lottery thing goes.

And using wheel spacers would have solved the clearance issue, but would have required machining some pretty tricky adapters. These wheels are all "hub-centric" which complicates any number of otherwise simple solutions.

And as so often is the case...now I need to get back to building a new firewall and a doghouse for the back of the engine before I can proceed with hanging the pedals and master cylinder to wrap up the brake system.

If it ain't one thing it's another.

Onward!
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Old 04-11-2015, 10:44 AM   #922
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Hey Tango, looking good. With all that braking area you probably don't even need the hydroboost. Its got to feel good to have her back on all fours (sixes). I think you will find that the project really starts to come together once you have the cowl in. As I recall, you purchased a steering column from an Isuzu NPR. If you still plan to use it I'd suggest you take it apart and reverse the long "U"
shaped bracket so that the open side faces the front of the truck. You do have to make a few minor mods to get the tilt and telescope functions to work but it allows you to position the shaft that goes to the steering sector just about where ever you need it top go. It also makes for more foot room as the bend in the bracket allows the column to be positioned closer to the fire wall. I found a pic of the reversed column. Jack

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Old 04-11-2015, 11:03 AM   #923
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I figure by the time you come pic all of us up, you should have a good road test under your belt.
Nice work!
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Old 04-11-2015, 11:34 AM   #924
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Quote:
Originally Posted by opus View Post
I figure by the time you come pic all of us up, you should have a good road test under your belt.
Nice work!
i hope he picks me up first. i want to see montana!
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Old 04-11-2015, 07:59 PM   #925
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Hey Jack --- speaking of steering...the Isuzu is set up with the gearbox in front of the wheels and I need to put mine behind the axle. I'm thinkin' (dangerous, I know) that just maybe, if I can rotate the arm 180 degrees, I might be able to use it. Otherwise, it would be "turn left to go right". Any thoughts, savvy, wisdom in this regard?
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Old 04-11-2015, 09:44 PM   #926
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Steering

Tango, that is exactly what I did. I moved the Isuzu steering gear to the rear of the axle and mounted it to the frame with a 1/2" plate sandwiched to the web of the frame and all boxed in. I cut the drag link on both ends to allow for reversal of the joints and welded it back together with a sleeve and dowel pins just to be sure. The "dog leg" in the original Isuzu drag link was retained as it gave perfect clearance for sharp left turns which otherwise would have allowed the tire to rub the drag link. Clear as mud? Here are some pics. Jack

[b] Original set up with gear in front of the axle.
[b] plate.[b/]

[b]Drag link. [b/]

[b] I found a pic of the steering column shaft. [b/]
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:29 AM   #927
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Outstanding...Thanks Jack! --- And here is one more issue that Newbies might want to consider when romancing old buses (And one that Jack is also very likely familiar with).

Doing body work on Wartime vehicles

Be advised that nearly all non-military steel products produced from shortly after Pearl Harbor through just beyond the end of WWII complied with that era's need to apply all the "good" metal to military use. In other words...much of the stuff made for civilian use was scrap metal...junk...truly weird and inconsistent metallurgy that was full of impurities. The end result very often being a product that resembles steel but just barely qualifies due to all the garbage in it. The critical things like engines & frames seem fine but the sheetmetal on the bodies is a whole nuther story.

Fast forward to today and trying to weld this metal


First off, I do not claim to be a welder. I've done a lot of it over the last twenty-five years with no problems, but I have far too much respect for that profession to ever refer to my self by that honored and highly regarded title. That said, I have had very good results overall including being able to weld 26 gauge galvanized stucco lath onto a large steel beam.

Then I encountered the metal on my '46 Chevy. I have never had as much frustration as I have had with trying to work this particular flavor of metal. Usually I can dial in either of my little Millers pretty quickly and tackle most work. But not this sheetmetal. There does not appear to be any setting that will produce that sweet Miller "sizzle". Seems no matter how low I go, it still blows out. I swear that this stuff seems to be 40% lead or some other similar component that vaporizes at just above room temperature and splatters all over creation.

I even took a cut away section to my local sheet metal shop to see what they could come up with and after several rounds that produced the same results I had, their very professional advice was..."think about glue and rivets".

Which I am.

Anyhow...sorry to ramble on like this but frustration of this degree needs to be shared, right? And hopefully some of you can approach similar situations better armed than I was going in.

WWII produced a lot of great things for which we can all be proud.
School bus bodies were not among them.
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:48 AM   #928
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Hey Tango. I guess I got lucky--the drums of war had yet to sound when my bus was built so the metal was still pretty good. I think a blind man with a buzz box could have successfully welded the thing. Nothing wrong with glue and rivets though. Jack
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Old 04-13-2015, 10:58 AM   #929
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OR you could do like the "pro" did when he worked on the 75th anniversary Mark VIII, I was going to buy

I popped the hood and first thing I saw was a couple hundred self drill hex head screws used to hold all the plastic down...I almost cried...
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Old 04-13-2015, 11:01 AM   #930
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Hey Jack --- I had forgotten how much older your rig is. You got in well ahead of the scrap drives.

Need to start shopping for the latest Sika adhesives, I already have the riveter. Just wish it was an air powered one that my crappy little compressor could drive.

Bansil --- At least they weren't drywall screws!
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