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Old 04-13-2015, 10:05 PM   #931
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Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: So Cal
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Year: 1935
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Engine: 317 ci/tid / Isuzu
Dry wall screws----- Back a while at work we recovered a stolen Datsun 240Z. It had been stolen from a local repair shop, sent to Mexico for repairs and remarketed in So. Calif. Dumb luck found it because of an expired tag etc, etc. The car had been "T" Boned and the cowl and A pillar had been shoved in. The A pillar had been repaired by screwing (with dry wall screws) a 4 x 4 to the crushed pillar and attaching the drivers door to that with lag bolts. The car actually looked pretty good. Perhaps there is something here that will help you with your bus--but then again, probably not. Jack
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Old 04-23-2015, 05:20 PM   #932
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Gotta love that down home body work Jack. Ain't it amazing what you sometimes find under a layer of Bondo? A buddy bought a '49 or '50 Ford Shoebox a few years back that had been "restored" by it's previous owner. In the process of doing a little work on it a few months later he discovered most of one rear fender had been crushed in maybe six or eight inches and never straightened...the whole cavity just filled with massive amounts of Bondo & reshaped. Looked fine from the outside but must have weighed an extra 90 pounds. Crazy thing is...it probably would'a been faster & cheaper just to replace the damned thing. Go figger.

What made me think of it was your reference to screws. At least whoever did the above work had the good sense to run a hundred or so sheet metal screws partially into the damaged area to help keep the Bondo in place until it sold.
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Old 04-27-2015, 09:44 AM   #933
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A few more Baby Steps --- Spent a few days doing something I am as thoroughly unqualified for as anything else on this build. Playing "Body Man". It is an art with skills I have always had a great deal of respect for. Even more so now.

The lower cowl on both sides of my bus were rusted away from the inside out and had to be replaced. I got really lucky and found a chap who just happens to hand craft body replacement parts for war years Chevy trucks which is what my Shorty is based on. But naturally, mine is just different enough that even parts made for these rascals needed to be modified a bit to work as "Busware". Still put me way ahead of the game since it also involved reinforcing brackets as well as body panels. Took them to my local sheetmetal shop, had them trimmed & folded to fit my rig and dove in.


Here is the cutout with the reinforcing bracket already in place along the bottom.


Body panel tacked in place. I had absolute fits trying to weld the crappy slag metal that was used for civilian purposes during the war years. No matter how I set my Miller...it would blow out. I am convinced there is more lead in this stuff than steel.


After waaay too much grief, they are finally in place and all metal. No Bondo. I hate that crap. Surface filler, OK...but I want the repair itself to be steel.


And while I was in the neighborhood, I went ahead and removed all the old sealant between the cowl & bus body. Left the anti-squeek rummer gasket and will come back and fill the whole joint with seam sealer. It is perfect for this type of gap and fully paintable.

All for the moment. I am now trying to work out the new firewall, doghouse and dash. Gonna be tricky.

Onward!
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Old 04-27-2015, 11:00 AM   #934
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Looking good Tango. My bus had the same rust out area but no replacement panels available so it took a lot of time to get to where you are--and yours looks a lot smoother! Since the cowl was off my bus, I welded the cowl to the body. That did away with the seam and made a firm base for the new cowl face. Jack
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Old 04-27-2015, 11:20 AM   #935
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Thanks Jack --- I thought about welding the cowl but given the nasty nature of this rigs' steel, decided to just go with seam sealer rather than burn a few hundred holes in it that take forever to try and patch.

Next time I'll be smart and work on something older that is made from real metal. Like yours.
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Old 05-05-2015, 06:58 PM   #936
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Old 05-05-2015, 08:22 PM   #937
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It's just my opinion, but it's too bad the guy didn't write a check to get the front fenders to match the wheel base of the replacement frame. Tango's finished product will put this one to shame. Jack
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Old 05-05-2015, 09:53 PM   #938
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Hey Jack --- There's one I haven't seen before. Thanks for the pic. At least his appears to be assembled. Mine still has quite a ways to go. I'm working on fabbing the new dash/firewall/pedals & such and it is a royal pain. Might have something to show in a week or two if I can break out'a my other job(s) long enough.

Till next time...

Onward!
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Old 05-08-2015, 10:14 AM   #939
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Jack --- Knowing that you won't accept any work not supported by pix...

Below is the start on the new firewall & dash. Given that the engine is set back so far (to squeeze in between the narrow frame rails)...the new firewall will be located where the old dash was.

Here is a "before"...and a shot with the dash metal cleaned and ready for welding in the first chunk of 14 gauge. It is going to be a little tricky. A new doghouse is also being worked up that is going to be a bear, but hey...just about everything else is from scratch, so why not.


In the beginning...


The new firewall will be flat and flush with the old dash with only a small setback on the drivers side for pedals.

Still trying to figger out how & where the new steering column will be routed. Definitely a little to the left of where it was.

Onward!
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Old 05-10-2015, 09:35 PM   #940
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Grrrrrrr!!! --- finally had a full day to work on the bus and a "quick, minor" project took up nearly all my time today. Had swapped a 5+ foot long Taco Truck oil dipstick for a shorty but as it turns out it was too short for reasonable access now that the engine is set back so far. So...back to Cummins for something in between. They had one that is 27" which was close to my preferred measurement. But...the danged thing was intent on obstructing my throttle. At first I tried running it to one side and through the original firewall. Modified the factory bracket, drilled a hole, bolted it up but still couldn't get it to bend out of the throttles' way. Then I remembered...oh yeah...these little four bangers shake all over the place which would no doubt rip the tube and/or the firewall apart in short order. Finally found a way to route it closer to and on top of the engine where they can move together. But that called for cutting, drilling and welding another a custom bracket. More time lost. Finally got it tucked in and bolted down where it should be out of harms' way.

Note to self...slow down and think things through better. It's the little, simple stuff that always seems to eat your lunch.

And yes Jack...I'll post a pic soon. After the frustration, I just had to head for my neighborhood bar to reflect and meditate a bit. Not being a practicing Buddhist...I have to resort to Rum for such guidance & insight.
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