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Old 01-30-2018, 07:23 PM   #101
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Sounding good.

Next time you're bored with nothing to do I might be able to help you out.
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Old 01-30-2018, 08:54 PM   #102
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how do you disassemble the oil cooler and put it back together? I was thinking of pulling pine and checking it on my 444E, motor has a lot of hours and miles and that thing sits low so i figured id pull and check it.. I only had oil temp concerns at high RPM (10-15 degrees above coolant).. but still might be a nice spring project to check it all out.. '

-Christopher
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:10 AM   #103
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
how do you disassemble the oil cooler and put it back together? I was thinking of pulling pine and checking it on my 444E, motor has a lot of hours and miles and that thing sits low so i figured id pull and check it.. I only had oil temp concerns at high RPM (10-15 degrees above coolant).. but still might be a nice spring project to check it all out.. '

-Christopher
If it is the same design (which based on pictures I'm looking at, it is...), the cast end pieces are only held in place by the o-rings. Once you unbolt it from the block, you can tap the pieces off the main tube using a rubber mallet. Clean everything up... new o-rings.. lots of assembly grease.. and push it back together. I've done 2 by hand... 1 I had to use a press to reassemble. None of them have leaked so far. The new o-rings will make for a VERY tight fit going back together.
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Old 01-31-2018, 06:00 AM   #104
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Super cool! Are there any guideline rules used for where oil T should be in reference to coolant?
I notice in my brand new hemi truck that it’s oil T is always above coolant temp , it’s a gasser.

From what I’ve read the 7.3 and 444echavexthe same and adequate oil coolers stock, I don’t see aftermarket upgrade parts like I do the 6.0
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Old 01-31-2018, 10:03 AM   #105
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I'd say you are fine. Most say, that I can find anyways, is under heavy loads, 240 oil temp is about the safe limit.

As far as the 6.0 and all of its available upgrades to the oil cooler system... that is because the 6.0's factory design is garbage and the OEM coolant (when not properly maintained) allows for silicate drop-out which ends up plugging the tiny orifices in the cooler. Just behind the oil cooler in the same cooling loop is the EGR coolers.. so when the oil cooler plugs, the EGR coolers can't get sufficient flow (no other route for coolant to go other then through the oil cooler first) When that happens, the EGR coolers can (and typically do) flash the coolant to steam and rupture the cooler. The main reason people closely watch oil/coolant temp correlation on the 6.0 is because the cooler itself performs really well and will keep oil temp within a few degrees of coolant temp. As it starts to plug up, the oil temp will gradually start running higher then the coolant temps.

In other words, I wouldn't be overly worried about it.
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Old 01-31-2018, 11:46 AM   #106
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Originally Posted by Mr4btTahoe View Post
I'd say you are fine. Most say, that I can find anyways, is under heavy loads, 240 oil temp is about the safe limit.

As far as the 6.0 and all of its available upgrades to the oil cooler system... that is because the 6.0's factory design is garbage and the OEM coolant (when not properly maintained) allows for silicate drop-out which ends up plugging the tiny orifices in the cooler. Just behind the oil cooler in the same cooling loop is the EGR coolers.. so when the oil cooler plugs, the EGR coolers can't get sufficient flow (no other route for coolant to go other then through the oil cooler first) When that happens, the EGR coolers can (and typically do) flash the coolant to steam and rupture the cooler. The main reason people closely watch oil/coolant temp correlation on the 6.0 is because the cooler itself performs really well and will keep oil temp within a few degrees of coolant temp. As it starts to plug up, the oil temp will gradually start running higher then the coolant temps.

In other words, I wouldn't be overly worried about it.
good deal. the most I ever saw was 10 degrees above coolant temp and thats with my foot to the floor on a several mile grade running it as fast as the engine would go with my old AT545.. with my new 1000 trans even down to 4th gear i only ever see about 5 degrees above coolant temp on a long grade.. back to 5th gear and it comes right down.. i can watch it drop.. 6th gear it will run a degree or two below coolant temp.. (makes sense since it appears the oil cooler gets the freshly cooled coolant from the radiator.. and the coolant temp sensor is in an area after the coolant is heated by the engine.)...

sounds like im just fine and dont even need to take my oil cooler apart..
im of the mind if it works good and doesnt leak then not to touch it.

-Christopher
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Old 01-31-2018, 11:59 AM   #107
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While the new synthetics handle heat much better than the
"old style" fluids, anything from 200* up is definitely degrading the fluid. And the higher it goes, the faster it degrades...rapidly. And the trans life expectancy goes down in direct proportion to the heat going up.

About 180-190 is ideal according to many studies including those done by Allison.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:58 PM   #108
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While the new synthetics handle heat much better than the
"old style" fluids, anything from 200* up is definitely degrading the fluid. And the higher it goes, the faster it degrades...rapidly. And the trans life expectancy goes down in direct proportion to the heat going up.

About 180-190 is ideal according to many studies including those done by Allison.
Engine oil temp... not transmission temp. For transmissions, I'd say 150-180 is the butter zone.. warm enough to evaporate moisture yes cool enough that the fluid lasts a LONG time. The fluid will rapidly break down above 220... I completely toasted a trans when the converter clutch failed to hold lock-up.. fluid hit 240-260 for an hour. Fluid was black as coal when I drained it. The cooler.. the better as long as moisture is handled.


Now ss far as the reasoning for pulling it apart and cleaning it/resealing it is more to replace the old/cracked o-rings because they will fail... just a matter of when. I've rebuilt 2 before they started leaking.. 1 that was leaking. All of the seals looked to be in the same condition so it was just a matter of when.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:50 PM   #109
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"Ideal" temp for tranny fluid is indeed 175* for conventional fluid. Some of the new synthetics are happy at 190. Anything over those numbers for each type fluid will also shorten the life of the trans. And it doesn't take much for very long.

The chart below (courtesy of The Transmission Guy) is almost identical to the Allison info (I couldn't find it this time). Note that running at 220* will reduce tranny fluid life by half compared to keeping it at 175*.



Be cool Honey Bunny...be cool.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:56 PM   #110
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I agree 100%.... But we were talking about engine oil temperature... Not transmission temperature. Chris had asked about pulling apart his oil cooler and the temperature of the engine oil... Which is what I was replying to earlier.

His engine oil temp was a little over coolant temp which is completely normal with our style of oil cooler and oil temp upwards of 240 isn't unheard of when pushing the engine. He was well within the safe limits of engine oil temp... Obviously the cooler the better however.
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