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Old 05-10-2019, 05:24 PM   #41
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The nail sets are for countersinking finishing nails just below the surface of wood so they can filled flush.
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Old 05-15-2019, 02:39 PM   #42
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Year: 1973
Engine: 350 Block
Minor update

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
The nail sets are for countersinking finishing nails just below the surface of wood so they can filled flush.
Oh they'll be super helpful for putting thin plywood facing on my bench etc! Thanks Tango!




update on progress
I'm filling floor holes with loctite PL premium then covering with aluminum tape. Seems like overkill from what I've read but there are so many dang holes it seems worthwhile to be sure they wont cause me problems down the line. I applied some ospho to the floor under where the driver seat used to be and some up in the footwell. I'll go back and thoroughly cover all that metal in ospho.. in the photo of the footwell you can sort of see where I've applied it and where the rust is untouched... It feels like an alarming amount of rust compared to the rest of the floor but it still seems structurally sound at this point.

Should I paint all that footwell metal with rustoleum paint too?

First photo shows patched holes in floor
Second photo shows driver footwell rust and patches of ospho metal
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Old 05-15-2019, 05:15 PM   #43
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Originally Posted by Orangetoes View Post
For insulation on the floor I'm planning to lay down pink board and use a can of spray foam for the corners and edges.

I believe I've read the spray foam in a can is a horrible mistake, something about it causes metal to trap moisture and rust out quickly.
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Old 05-15-2019, 07:14 PM   #44
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Originally Posted by Brad_SwiftFur View Post
I believe I've read the spray foam in a can is a horrible mistake, something about it causes metal to trap moisture and rust out quickly.

Thanks for the heads up! Found one of Tango's old posts:
"Ya...Great Stuff ain't so great for much of anything. And as noted above...it will attack steel like a metal munching piranha. Also...if injected into a closed area...it will remain fluid and never set except around the outer edges. Crapolla in my book."

I will stay away!
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Old 05-17-2019, 12:10 AM   #45
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Insulation and Window Sealing

I got the wall slots filled with R tech insulation. 1" with the reflective side out and .5" with the reflective side facing in. That stuff sure makes a mess but otherwise it went in relatively smoothly.

The driver window is proving to be a real pain putting back in. Tomorrow I think I'll have to use thinner seal strip on the bottom or something because it was NOT going in tonight. I ran out of daylight. I've done a couple of the other windows and popped them back in easy enough. The two sliding windows on the driver window frame make it super tricky.

I also fashioned a DIY gutter resolution. The tiny bus 'gutter' is actually quite effective (more of a water catching lip than a gutter). Up until the last 2 or 3 inches on each of the 4 corners, where the water would spill over and seep down the side of the bus and into the window frame. I tested the idea in the rain before installing and it seemed to make a huge difference.


First photo shows the DIY gutter solution -looks like rust on the exterior but it's just red primer paint that got everywhere...

Second photo shows the old window seal adhesive which is tricky as heck to get off.
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:04 PM   #46
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Questions

Photos show the fully patched and repainted floor (now at 2 layers of rustoleum, going for a third.) And the rear door panels removed; which was a big job for me since it involved unscrewing part of the rear door. I did it successfully though! Hoo rah!

I've been really pushing forward with progress and running into plenty of challenges along the way! I've got most of my ceiling insulation up -went with 1.5" R Max between the ribs, just shoved up there no adhesive needed.
Currently I'm working on a solution for some hard to get to and likely rusted in screws which are holding the pump system for the front door. Will attempt to chisel off the heads today.

Has anyone considered using Simpson Strap Ties or something similar for attaching interior stuff to the bus?
Seems straightforward to me and if I use separate strap ties for separate furniture items, they'll never exceed the 1500 psi rating of the tie.

My plan--> pop rivet the strap tie directly to the ribs, and then bolt my wooden stuff to the strap ties. Any thoughts or warnings here?


My next challenge to tackle before the flooring goes in, is the sink drainage. I want to have a simple straight pipe system from the sink down through the floor. I want to just have the grey water dump into an easy to empty container under the bus while parked.

How do I insulate a break in the thermal layer like this? AKA: How do I prevent heat loss with a gaping hole in the floor?


Since it's a 1973 bus and safety isnt up to code, I consider it a death trap and plan to drive it as such. This being said, I'm still interested in making my driver seat as safe as I can (mostly for my moms worrying).
I have removed the driver seat but still have it on hand. I want to install my pull out bench against the steering wheel so that it could double as the driver seat. I'm currently looking at Simpson Strong Ties/ Deck tension ties to bolt to the floor then attach my seat structure too.
Does anyone have tips on how to go about something like this?

I'm not afraid to work with metal though I have no welder or special tools. I can cut and rivet though and I think that'll get me pretty far...
I have lots of brainstorming on how to go about this and I'm willing to build the driver seat separate from the bench and then build the bench around the seat. I could have some kind of hinged cover for when in bench mode that would lift up when driving to expose the seat...?
any direction is appreciated!
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:08 PM   #47
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Second layer of paint. Fully patched.

Next step is attaching driver seat to the floor in the front and drilling the sink/grey water drain hole through the floor in the rear.
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Old 06-13-2019, 03:29 PM   #48
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Looks like a fun project.


Nice thing about the 350 chevy is they are dirt simple to work on.. cheap and plentiful. Down side is fuel mileage.


With that 4 speed (no overdrive), you're probably turning fairly high rpm at highway speed. Might be worth while to find a 5 speed down the road.


Keep up the good work!
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:14 PM   #49
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr4btTahoe View Post
Looks like a fun project.


Nice thing about the 350 chevy is they are dirt simple to work on.. cheap and plentiful. Down side is fuel mileage.


With that 4 speed (no overdrive), you're probably turning fairly high rpm at highway speed. Might be worth while to find a 5 speed down the road.


Keep up the good work!
and parts can be found anywhere
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:31 PM   #50
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr4btTahoe View Post
Looks like a fun project.
Nice thing about the 350 chevy is they are dirt simple to work on.. cheap and plentiful. Might be worth while to find a 5 speed down the road.
Keep up the good work!
Let's just say I've been consistently dropping huge garbage sacks of crap off at goodwill to try and get myself and my stuff to fit. And now there'll be two of us living in there...

Skoolie livin' is definitely a lifestyle.

It will be a slow and spendy method of travel, but my love for this bus is growing deeper with each struggle. Every imperfection is part of the process
it'll be parked for 4-8 months at a time anyway.
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