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Old 03-11-2015, 06:31 PM   #91
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
No, I caved and purchased it. GrayStove.com - GRAY STOVE. I had aspirations of building my own, but I just didn't have the time.
Would love a few words on how this stove is burning for you. We were dead-set on using it until I changed my mind and decided to do a diesel boiler and radiant in-floor. But we loved the look and price and were still thinking of getting one at some point.

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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
The idea of powder coating it came up in a conversation with my "father in-law", as well. I'll have to do some research to see if it would stand up to the heat, but I think some folks powder coat turbos and up-pipes and such, so perhaps it'll happily take the heat.
The powder-coating is easy - getting a high-temp-resistant paint is harder. For engines, anyway - the exhaust side of a turbo can hit 2200F, sometimes even 2350F like in a Mazda Rotary pulling hard. A wood stove is going to be in the 300F-800F range and then you're overheating it. Lots of paints are compatible with that range. Look for something with a service rating up to 1200F or so. There's a company that make one just for stoves - Stove Light? Stove Bright? Something like that.

Any place that deals with a lot of auto parts can almost certainly do it.
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Old 03-11-2015, 06:52 PM   #92
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Tankswap

And other fellow skoolies anywhere that freezes at night.

I fully recommend getting a wood stove if you have the space and money. They are a great fall back system if everything else fails. There is always something around to burn.

The human body loves radiant heat. That's why the sun feels so good coming through a window in winter. This is built into our human DNA from years of evaluation.

Wood and other solid fuel stoves replicate this radiant heat. So do radiant hot water heat systems.

Forced air heating systems do not replicate this radiant heat. Air has no mass to store the heat to radiate. This is why forced air heating systems are so inefficient.

Nat
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Old 03-21-2015, 11:35 PM   #93
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Man I like that wood stove it looks great, in fact I have one in my bus,
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Old 03-27-2015, 11:26 AM   #94
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A shot of us parked for supper at the top of a pass in Big Bend National Park. Really cool park.. not pet friendly, unfortunately.




Here's a fun photo. We just fit inside the lines in a parking lot in downtown Denver. We paid for overnight parking and "camped" here.



The brown streaks are creosote. I was still tinkering with the settings on the stove and let it smoulder too much overnight. The chimney cap was on at the time. The creosote condensed on the cap and dribbled on the roof.
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Old 03-27-2015, 12:46 PM   #95
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Hi, I have a question about the wood stove. I have small amounts of smoke coming out from around the door, it looks as if the fire retardant rope does not touch the stove. Have you had any problems like this.
Thanks John
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Old 03-27-2015, 01:01 PM   #96
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Originally Posted by Better Tomorrows View Post
Hi, I have a question about the wood stove. I have small amounts of smoke coming out from around the door, it looks as if the fire retardant rope does not touch the stove. Have you had any problems like this.
Thanks John
It sounds like a draft problem. How tall is your chimney? It has to be well above the roof line, otherwise when the wind is blowing right (wrong?) it can create a high pressure zone, which results in a chimney back-draft.

My primary chimney section only extends about 10" above the roof. I've used it like that on the road here-and-there, but it sometimes creates a draft problem. When I'm more stationary or it is required because of wind I use a chimney extension to raise the chimney well above the height of all other roof-top items. It's tall enough to extend above the solar panels when they are in an upright position and easy to remove for driving.

I used double-walled wood pellet chimney pipe which locks into place when twisted. That's another thing: you need to keep the exhaust hot to create enough draft. Use double-wall, triple-wall or, preferably, insulated chimney pipe.

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Old 03-27-2015, 02:34 PM   #97
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Okay, my pellet pipe is 60 inches long of which 12 inches is above the highest point of the roof line. I'll go buy more pipe, 3 foot should do it? Thanks for the insight.
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Old 03-27-2015, 02:43 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Better Tomorrows View Post
Okay, my pellet pipe is 60 inches long of which 12 inches is above the highest point of the roof line. I'll go buy more pipe, 3 foot should do it? Thanks for the insight.
Hmm.. that actually sounds like a decent run. My entire chimney from the top of the stove to the cap is only about 6 feet tall. It looks taller from the outside, but the fireplace is raised about 2.5' above the floor. I would expect being a foot above the highest point would work just fine for a schoolie, though for residential installations it's recommended to be 2' above the highest point.

I suppose it's worth trying a 3' segment, but that stuff can be damn expensive! Perhaps it'd be worth experimenting with something cheaper...
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Old 03-27-2015, 03:00 PM   #99
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What diameter is it?

What you want to do is get (or make, but they're cheap) yourself a good manometer that can measure in w/c. This is the one the folks on Arboristsite.com are always recommending:
http://www.amazon.com/Dwyer-25-Manom...3C8/ref=sr_1_6

n.b.: I don't own this one - I have an older, uglier unit my dad gave me - but people seem to like this one, and the price is right. Amazon has a great return policy if you don't like it.

This will probably confirm that you have a weak draft. Chimney length is a major contributor to draft, and it's hard to get much in a school bus. You kind of have to have a removable extension piece if you're going to be traveling. Insulation helps a LOT, though. You can either use double/triple-walled pipe, or if that cost makes you choke, you can get an insulation kit from a place like this:

Chimney Liner Flue Pipe Blanket Wrap Insulation Kits - Pour-Down Insulation | Rockford Chimney Supply

This is a stiff insulating blanket that you wrap around the flue. It's really meant for in-chimney installations when installing liners, but it works great, is pretty cheap, and doesn't look too terrible with its foil facing. IMO, the rigid liner insulation product on that page looks good enough to stand on its own in a home, but it's a bit more expensive. Your call.

Getting the right chimney cap helps a LOT too. A flat cap with a mesh screen can hurt a weak draft a lot, and also enables the kinds of wind-induced downdrafts others mentioned above. Vacu-stacks are popular although overpriced IMO:

Vacu-Stack Wind Resistant Chimney Cap | WoodlandDirect.com: Chimney Caps & Accessories, Improved Consumer Products

I'm a fan of concentric shrouds, which you can totally DIY out of one piece of 2" or so wider diameter straight flue pipe - you make that the one that's your extension. I have all kinds of pics saved on this somewhere but can't find them. This page has one thumbnail that's basically the idea:

Wood Smoke - Leichhardt Municipal Council

These create a "venturi effect" that increases draft. Note that there is no top cap on this. Rain never falls STRAIGHT down, so if the extension is at least a few feet, it hits the sides and drips out the bottom rather than into your stove. Sounds weird but it works.

Make sure you have enough make-up air coming in. Not usually a problem in a bus, but...

So much to go through, but the summary: a taller, better insulated chimney is a huge helper for solving draft problems.
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Old 03-27-2015, 03:15 PM   #100
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Nice write up, taskswap! I'm intrigued by that pour-down chimney insulation. I might try something similar to convert my double wall exterior chimney into an insulated one.
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