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Old 01-12-2016, 07:03 AM   #11
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The panels welded onto the floor that didn't have holes would have had holes if the bus had been a wheelchair bus. The tie downs would have needed some place for the anchors to have been bolted down.
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Old 01-12-2016, 12:06 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cowlitzcoach View Post
The panels welded onto the floor that didn't have holes would have had holes if the bus had been a wheelchair bus. The tie downs would have needed some place for the anchors to have been bolted down.
Hmm though it actually was setup for wheelchairs - there was a lift that got removed. Maybe it was just sort of their standard prep for any bus floor but depending on configuration it would be drilled or not drilled.

It's all metal under the insulated plywood floor now
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Old 01-12-2016, 01:38 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Puggy View Post
Hmm though it actually was setup for wheelchairs - there was a lift that got removed. Maybe it was just sort of their standard prep for any bus floor but depending on configuration it would be drilled or not drilled.

It's all metal under the insulated plywood floor now

Excuse me, I wasn't clear.

All of the buses go down the same production line regardless of the final configuration and have the same basic stuff under the skin. As they go down the line they will add or not add a lift door and a lift.

It is much easier to prep under the floor for all applications than to slow the process down to add additional prep for certain models.
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Old 01-18-2016, 09:54 PM   #14
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Have continued the last week or so finishing up the flooring, and chasing down one last (hah yea right) leak in the back...

Flooring
As mentioned before, it's 1x2 primed fascia/trim boards glued and screwed down, with insulation between and 1/2" plywood on top. Plywood is screwed into the 1x2s.



Old van seat temporarily setup in the back. There will be a fold up bed/couch back there eventually.





That hole in the floor by the passenger door is the old foot well area if it was a typical side-door van. Hoping to take out the extra metal (which is there as a bolt down for bus seats) and turn it into storage, possibly for batteries if I can find them small enough.

Last leak, I swear!
I'm being pretty paranoid about leaks. Basically I know if I don't find them now, I'll never find them when the walls and such are finished, at least until water stains start showing up after it's been leaking for a while. This is the last/latest, above the back doors. The hollow framing above the doors has been accumulating a bit of water, that leads to some drips when it's been pouring. We had over 1" of rain yesterday so it was "expressing" itself well.

I finally tracked it down (I hope) to this small gap in the gutter above the back door....



I blasted the gap dry with the compressor, and filled it liberally with butyl caulk, then did a bit of hammering to close the gap. Hope that fixes things.

The other problem was the water that had accumulated in the void area above the back door, shown below. It looks like it's been doing it for quite a while based on some rust in there.





I'm wondering if it might not be a good idea to just chop the whole thing off and replace it with some new steel framing. It's been an ongoing leak for many years I believe, and I'm not able to get inside and really treat it or paint it.

After sealing the gap (I hope), I had to get the water out of there, so stuck the shop vac with the hose on "blow" into the end holes. I let it run for about 15 minutes, and it did a great job of drying out the hole. Next stop is to fill the void with some closed cell foam I think. Not so much to stop leaks, but just to insulated it and fill the void (and be closed cell in case it may leak in the future. But not until I know I've fixed the leak on the outside.

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Old 01-24-2016, 09:29 PM   #15
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Last Week's Update

It's been raining a lot, but since the roof isn't leaking anymore (YES!) it's easy to work inside the bus. The main thing to do this week was investigate what that leak in the gutter above the rear doors has been up to, and use some expanding foam to fill in a few areas around the floor.

Back Door Leak
The more I looked at that rust in the structure over the back doors, the more I thought I really needed to get in there and see what it was like inside the hollow metal enclosure. So out came the angle grinder and a cutoff wheel. And what I found was there'd been a long-term leak that was coming in via that seam in the gutter. And of course rust as a result. Who in their right (engineering) mind puts a seam right inside of a thing that's supposed to hold, pool, and channel water!?


The culprit for the leak that was coming in over the back doors


Inside metal above back door chopped off to reveal rust


Holes in the metal that came out after some wire wheel work to take off the rust

The open seam in the gutter has been all caulked inside and out, and the interior metal all wire wheeled, treated with Ospho, and repainted. Ultimately I'll need to seal up those pinholes holes in the metal, but fortunately it's in an area that shouldn't get further water exposure now that I've fixed the leaking.

I <3 Expanding Foam
Expanding foam is so much fun to play with! But you just have to make sure you've got enough stuff to use the whole can, otherwise it just dries in the tube and you have to chuck the whole thing!

There was a gap all around the base of the new flooring I did that needed to be taken care of, along with some smaller gaps around the wheel wells and the wall. I picked up a can of closed cell foam (I forget the brand, but not "Great Stuff") and went to town.


Drivers side rear foaming


Foam around wheel wells


Just too much fun


Foam trimmed down with a thin/long knife blade

Prepping the Wall Above the Back Doors
So above the aforementioned leaking back doors, there is a large expanse of rather unsupported metal due to the lift. I needed to make it stop flexing and popping, but also needed something to attach a piece of plywood to for finishing off the back wall.

What I did was basically use the same approach as I did with the floor. I used construction adhesive and screws to attach 1-by pre-primed wood to the surface. But in this case the screws are from the outside.

It really made the back metal much more even as well as took out all the "pop" that you'd get when you pushed on it. The metal from the lift is pretty thin, and also not super flat and prone to noisily popping in/out when you push on it. This helped a lot with that "not flat" part.

Just one picture but it should give you the idea...



For reference, the lower part of that wall that's painted brown is the new metal from the lift.

Still need to put up some more strips around the outer edges, but after that I'll put sheet foam in between, then cover the whole thing with some 1/2" plywood that will then get covered with something nice and/or paintable. I'm hoping this will be a sufficiently rigid setup that I can then use to mount some lightweight shelves or storage - nothing heavy.

Speaking of Foam Sheeting
I've been wondering about what kind of adhesive to use for gluing the foam to the inner walls and ceiling, and specifically how to do it fairly cheaply. I did a bit of an experiment today with a hot glue gun, and found that it does a good job. Yes it might get a bit loose over time, or even melt some in the hot sun, but once the inner walls go up, they will hold the foam pretty snugly in place. The hot glue gun is a good way to put it up quickly without getting all exotic adhesivey (and spendy).
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:13 PM   #16
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I don't know how hot glue compares for cost per lineal foot or whatever metric might be used.. but anyway, one shouldn't have any trouble finding a tube of foam-compatible adhesive in an 10 oz "caulk tube" package. Home Depot lists "Loctite PL300 Foamboard Adhesive" for $3.68 on their web site for instance. I'd think it would be hard to keep hot glue hot long enough to get a good bond to both the metal and the foam.
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Old 01-24-2016, 10:33 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
I don't know how hot glue compares for cost per lineal foot or whatever metric might be used.. but anyway, one shouldn't have any trouble finding a tube of foam-compatible adhesive in an 10 oz "caulk tube" package. Home Depot lists "Loctite PL300 Foamboard Adhesive" for $3.68 on their web site for instance. I'd think it would be hard to keep hot glue hot long enough to get a good bond to both the metal and the foam.
The foam I'm using actually has mylar on both faces, so I don't think I actually need the foam-compatible stuff - simple construction adhesive might work. And you're right that it does cool fast - good point. Thought that said the fast cooling is what makes it easy to stick it and forget it with that fast drying time.

Mainly I just want something to tack it up and hold the foam until I get the sheathing in place.

The main motivation is that I have a ton of odd, colored hot glue gun glue from some old project and am trying to figure out how to use it up
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Old 03-03-2016, 01:33 AM   #18
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Join Date: Oct 2015
Location: Corvallis, OR
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Year: 1991
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Engine: 7.3L diesel
Rated Cap: 18
Well it's been a while since an update on Betty the Burner Bus, but that's not due to lack of work.

It's come time to start making things a bit pretty here and there inside the bus, and that starts with covering the bare walls.

The plan was to put up a thinner plywood siding inside - maybe even door skin plywood, with rigid foam underneath.

Attaching The Plywood
First step was to think about how the plywood interior was to attach to the framing. What I did was screw narrow strips of 3/4" exterior pre-primed trim to the sides of the 1x1 steel framing, using a bit of construction adhesive to make it all good.

This picture is post-insulation, but you can see the strips in place...



The idea is to glue and nail (with a brad nailer) plywood panels to the strips.

Insulation
I used hot glue gun glue (I had a lot of it, and it actually works well) to put up 1" rigid foam on the walls, but I did find that a bit of polyurethane caulk did a good job of making it stick too. For curved areas in the back, I kerfed the back of the foam, and put it up with lots of smaller strips to make it easier to work with. Then rigid foam to fill in the gaps and other spots.








Plywood and Trim
Next up was putting on the plywood and trim. The plywood is 1/4" underlayment that I found at a good price. One side has a nice light wood veneer that looks great - the heck with the spendy birch stuff The trim top and bottom is 1x2 hemlock, and the vertical pieces are thinner hemlock about 1/4" thick.

First thing was to cover the back with two larger pieces. I put construction adhesive on the wooden backing strips, then 5/8" finishing nails to hold it in place.



For above the window, I started with the top strip of 1x2, screwing it into the metal framing at each post using finishing screws (tiny little heads) that I put into pre-drilled holes into the metal.

Next up are 30" x 20" pieces of plywood butted up against the bottom of the top strip. I put some construction adhesive on the wooden support strips added earlier, then finishing nails to hold the plywood in place.

Next, another 1x2 strip along the bottom, this time on top of the plywood. Same attachment method with screws.

Lastly, 18.5" strips of the thin hemlock to cover each vertical seam in the plywood.







Next Steps
From here I'm going to just keep repeating the pattern on the rest of the walls. It gets a bit tricky in the back corners (but have a few ideas), and also I need to seal in some gaps along the bottom of the window frame to prevent future leaks.
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