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Old 06-22-2016, 06:19 AM   #1
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Black molding that runs horizontal on bus

Was thinking about vinyl wrapping my short bus and it would be a lot easier without the horizontal strips that are screwed into and run alongside the bus is there a purpose of these strips or would I be alright to remove them and wrap bus.
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Old 06-22-2016, 06:24 AM   #2
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The rub rails provide lateral strength to the bus body, so they need to stay. They also provide (on a normal school bus) visual reference lines for rescuers extricating the passengers.
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Old 06-22-2016, 06:37 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawnhall10 View Post
Was thinking about vinyl wrapping my short bus and it would be a lot easier without the horizontal strips that are screwed into and run alongside the bus is there a purpose of these strips or would I be alright to remove them and wrap bus.
I haven't removed any of the rub rails as I call them but on my Thomas body my rails the rails are screwed tight at the top and the screw holes at the bottom are stamped to be tight and the bottom of the rail in between actually sits off of the bus skin/metal for some reason? In my head it is probably 2 before 1
1- the bus skin has a small gap in it to try to vent the outer skin itself?
2- the bus skin is not one solid peice, the rub rail covers the seam, the seam is not riveted or screwed under the rails which allows it to flex, move,buckle bow during movement and more important during a crash the more flex the bus body can absorb the least impact the passengers feel?
I have been in a marine corp amtrack colliding with another. Both very ridgid structures. They only thing hurt was the men inside.
Just a thought?
Maybe cowlitz coach can provide better info.
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Old 06-22-2016, 07:06 PM   #4
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Rub rails serve two main purposes.

The first purpose, as was mentioned above, give reference to those outside where the floor level and seat level are on the inside.

The second purpose is two fold. First it provides additional anti-intrusion protection. And second, it adds additional rigidity to the bus body.

If the rub rail is not tight against the body on the downhill side it is most likely left open for water to drain out. There is no way a vacuum could be created under the rub rails. As a consequence, even if water doesn't run down the body and into the rub rails, the normal condensation of hot air would create water inside the rub rails every day. By leaving it open on the bottom any water that would accumulate drains right back out.

Can you take them off? Yes.

Why would you want to take them off? Outside of making it easier to put a wrap or vinyl logos or artwork on the bus I can't think of a good reason why to take them off. The original purpose of anti-intrusion is still a good idea after the bus has been made into an RV.
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Old 06-22-2016, 07:21 PM   #5
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Thank you for clearing that up for me. I don't plan on touching them but I did question there design and intent.
Hope you Have a good night.
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Old 06-22-2016, 07:37 PM   #6
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The extra rigidity the rub rails (aka: Torpedo Belt) provides is a major safety component of skoolies. They add side impact resistance.
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