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Old 06-13-2019, 11:49 PM   #1
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Buying this bus in 3 days!!!!

Hey guys. I thought I might post this to see if anyone has any thoughts or opinions on this bus. I'm picking it up in 3 days in southern Oregon. I'm very hopeful as I'll be turning this into my home in the next two weeks and hitting the road. The goal is short and long term driving. I'll be hitting mountain ranges and deserts.
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Old 06-14-2019, 12:01 AM   #2
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Depends how much you are spending on it. Not a whole lot of info in that ad. No specs on engine and trans

If it came across the country is it from the rust belt. Would be my first question.

Nice sized bus.
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:31 AM   #3
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^ Good points all.
W/O drivetrain info, there's no way to tell if it's a quarterhourse or a draught horse. Image2 in the ad prolly gives that info.
Full sized house range in a small bus- interesting choice...
Can't tell due to poor resolution, but the floor looks like raw plywood, and the original ceiling remains. Meaning, next to no insulation, making it an oven in the desert.
Built-ins look basic, at best.
Small solar panel, but no mention of house batteries, or if it's wired for 110V.
If the tires are tired, replacements'll take a sizeable divot out of you costs.
Finally, the $20,000 Question: asking price..?
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Old 06-14-2019, 11:43 AM   #4
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Hey guys thanks for the reply I believe it's a 12 valve 5.9 Cummins
I plan on re doing most of the inside keeping the basic lay out just upgrading the materials used.
Price is 5500
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:38 PM   #5
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I am betting the majority of "is this a good bus" opinion posters will say something like "that is way too much". You'll have to weigh the overall body condition, drivetrain, added amenities, and the amount of work you will have to do to remove all you do not want (as well as add any additional insulation if desired) to what has already been done to it. Also consider proximity. You do not have your location in your profile, so we can not tell if is it local
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Old 06-14-2019, 02:27 PM   #6
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IDK man. There are a few usable things inside, but nothing really notable, mostly household type appliances.

The money in a conversion isnít entirely in the bus. There is a huge outlay for all the plumbing, electrical, and gas appliances and all the little fittings (will surprise you!) and all the carpentry stuff. It all depends on what you want of course.

The quality of the conversion work already done needs to be considered. Based on the photos it kind of looks minimal and quickly done, but there isnít enough info to say that conclusively. I would look at it as a do-over and buy it based solely on the platform, so if the engine, transmission, body conditions are great, then maybe.

Good news! The price reduced to $5K last night.

Is it registered in Oregon? That might run you som extra bucks if it isnít.
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:36 PM   #7
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Hey guys, thanks for the thoughts.

A few hopeful answers.
I donít have a location, I have been doing work to live and helpi with a few start ups this past year so I have no homebase. I recently traveled from Oakland to Breckenridge. I am currently heading back to NorCal and then up to Oregon to get the bus. From there Iíll escort the bus to San Diego to my deisel mechanic. I will be parking in his lot for a few weeks while I refurbish.

The bus was offered at 5g but due to my current decisions I cannot really wait around for buses. I had my eye on a few previously, but due to my employer not being able to pay me in due time I lost the buses. So I offered the guy an extra 500 to hold it for me.
My current travel arrangement is a Toyota Sequoia with a cat a boyfriend and a 100lb dog. Iíve decided against trying to find an apartment and just going with the bus. Itís been a long time deciding but I know itíll be the right one.
We are minimalist outdoor junkies. We have electrical and carpenter skills as well as a little in plumbing. My boyfriend is a mechanic (though not deisel) .

This would be our permanent home. I am willing to put in a little extra up front due to my circumstances so the price is understandably a little more then some would pay.
I also hoped that the minimal amount of work interior wise might make it easier to work with.
I recently gutted and rebuilt a 20,000sq ft warehouse and boy let me tell you... the gutting was the hardest part.
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Old 06-14-2019, 08:57 PM   #8
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If he doesn't realize it, your BF is a blessed lad.
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Old 06-14-2019, 09:09 PM   #9
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Useable crap is easily had, any day of the week, urban area of your choice.
Not seeing any particularly huge outlay on plumbing. Yuh, there's a dunny in the corner, but dunno if its even attached to anything besides the floor (if that)! No mention of sanitary facilities in the write- up, is all I'm sayin'. Selling point, no?
Yup, done with love, or at least attention to detail, I'll agree those touches add up.
Wish I saw some of 'em here...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
IDK man. There are a few usable things inside, but nothing really notable, mostly household type appliances.

The money in a conversion isnít entirely in the bus. There is a huge outlay for all the plumbing, electrical, and gas appliances and all the little fittings (will surprise you!) and all the carpentry stuff. It all depends on what you want of course.

Good news! The price reduced to $5K last night.
Good news, or desperation for a quick flip?
And still, no idea which tranny it sports...
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:25 AM   #10
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Iíll call the guy in the morning about the tranny.
The toilet is just a hole to the ground. Iíll be removing that. No trace behind.
The bus was owned by a mechanic who converted it and drove it cross country. Just looks like man cave to me...I lived in a man cave for a while. Iím sure itíll be like home there is no plumbing in the bus. And the wood stove exhausts out of the window. Iíll probably get rid of the stove,I may replace it with a mini wood stove that I can pull out during the cold seasons. I have a bell tent that has a wood stove hole so itís be multifunctional. Iím excited to redo it so that it does have nice touches.
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Useable crap is easily had, any day of the week, urban area of your choice.
Not seeing any particularly huge outlay on plumbing. Yuh, there's a dunny in the corner, but dunno if its even attached to anything besides the floor (if that)! No mention of sanitary facilities in the write- up, is all I'm sayin'. Selling point, no?
Yup, done with love, or at least attention to detail, I'll agree those touches add up.
Wish I saw some of 'em here...


Good news, or desperation for a quick flip?
And still, no idea which tranny it sports...
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Old 06-15-2019, 08:51 AM   #11
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I agree the info is kinda spotty. A link to the actual Craigslist ad might help with advice. Seeing as it is an 80s-90s Ford truck chassis over 1-ton, however...

The VERY first question you should ask is air brake or hydraulic. From my understanding, the Lucas-Girling hydraulic brake systems on these are apparently a nightmare and very hard to get parts for. AFAIK, these were unique to Fords over 1-ton, and believe these have been out of production for some time. My former B700 had this system, and I have seen a 96 F650 box truck with it. Not many school buses had air brakes in 1993, so it is likely the system I speak of. From what I gather, most shops won't touch them, and those that will, will likely charge a king's ransom for brake service. If it is indeed hydraulic brake...


If the parking brake actuator is a flip-style toggle switch mounted in a black box with a yellow label, that is a dead giveaway -- That switch is the actuator for the parking brake, which I understand is a hydraulic unit that acts like a spring brake on a typical air-brake system. Typical brake service on these beasts can run $2000 or more just for the rear axle, which is what happens when people with college degrees and no common sense try to re-invent the wheel.

An air-brake bus would have a simple yellow diamond-shaped air valve handle. Most of these were hydraulic, but if it's air-brake and all else checks out, it could be a very good buy. Air brakes do not necessarily require a CDL. CDL is only required for certain vehicles, usually over 26k lbs GVWR, and I can tell from looking this one isn't even close. My 64-passenger only had a 24,100 GVWR at nearly twice the length and 3x the passenger capacity.

If this one does have air brakes, at most, you MIGHT need an air-brake endorsement -- which MIGHT require an upgrade to a Class C CDL - MAYBE. I doubt it though, pretty sure RV's are exempt from CDL requirements - an exemption I don't care for, as a CDL driver myself, but DOES apply once the title has been changed from BUS to RV or MOTORHOME. I WOULD, however, strongly encourage educating yourself about operating a vehicle with air-brakes, should this be the case -- They're not complicated, and quite reliable, just a few things you should know to keep small problems from becoming big ones. In the interest of safety, if necessary, I'm willing to walk anyone through the basics of air brakes - email me. A commercial driver's manual (available at most DMV / BMV offices) will help with this, they have an entire section dedicated to operating vehicles with air brakes.

Not trying to poo-poo this one simply on the brake system, but the last thing you need is to be stuck somewhere with worn-out brake linings and/or hydraulic fluid pouring out, blowing your wad on repairs, or worse, unable to get help with it at all. Also consider that these use a second engine-driven pump on which a broken drive belt will keep the parking brake from engaging or disengaging until it is replaced.

I would pass on buses with the Lucas-Girling brake system, just my $0.02. They work fine until they don't, and when they don't, well, be prepared to spend half, if not the full amount you paid for the bus, or more, to fix the brakes. But don't take my word for it -- Google 'Ford Lucas-Girling hydraulic brake system' and see what you find. Contact truck repair shops and ask them what they charge for brake system service on 2+ ton Ford trucks / buses with the Lucas-Girling system, or whether they will even touch them.
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Old 06-15-2019, 11:28 AM   #12
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https://medford.craigslist.org/cto/d...909981938.html

Here is the link. Thank you for your in depth post. I really appreciate it! Doing the suggested research now!

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON View Post
I agree the info is kinda spotty. A link to the actual Craigslist ad might help with advice. Seeing as it is an 80s-90s Ford truck chassis over 1-ton, however...

The VERY first question you should ask is air brake or hydraulic. From my understanding, the Lucas-Girling hydraulic brake systems on these are apparently a nightmare and very hard to get parts for. AFAIK, these were unique to Fords over 1-ton, and believe these have been out of production for some time. My former B700 had this system, and I have seen a 96 F650 box truck with it. Not many school buses had air brakes in 1993, so it is likely the system I speak of. From what I gather, most shops won't touch them, and those that will, will likely charge a king's ransom for brake service. If it is indeed hydraulic brake...


If the parking brake actuator is a flip-style toggle switch mounted in a black box with a yellow label, that is a dead giveaway -- That switch is the actuator for the parking brake, which I understand is a hydraulic unit that acts like a spring brake on a typical air-brake system. Typical brake service on these beasts can run $2000 or more just for the rear axle, which is what happens when people with college degrees and no common sense try to re-invent the wheel.

An air-brake bus would have a simple yellow diamond-shaped air valve handle. Most of these were hydraulic, but if it's air-brake and all else checks out, it could be a very good buy. Air brakes do not necessarily require a CDL. CDL is only required for certain vehicles, usually over 26k lbs GVWR, and I can tell from looking this one isn't even close. My 64-passenger only had a 24,100 GVWR at nearly twice the length and 3x the passenger capacity.

If this one does have air brakes, at most, you MIGHT need an air-brake endorsement -- which MIGHT require an upgrade to a Class C CDL - MAYBE. I doubt it though, pretty sure RV's are exempt from CDL requirements - an exemption I don't care for, as a CDL driver myself, but DOES apply once the title has been changed from BUS to RV or MOTORHOME. I WOULD, however, strongly encourage educating yourself about operating a vehicle with air-brakes, should this be the case -- They're not complicated, and quite reliable, just a few things you should know to keep small problems from becoming big ones. In the interest of safety, if necessary, I'm willing to walk anyone through the basics of air brakes - email me. A commercial driver's manual (available at most DMV / BMV offices) will help with this, they have an entire section dedicated to operating vehicles with air brakes.

Not trying to poo-poo this one simply on the brake system, but the last thing you need is to be stuck somewhere with worn-out brake linings and/or hydraulic fluid pouring out, blowing your wad on repairs, or worse, unable to get help with it at all. Also consider that these use a second engine-driven pump on which a broken drive belt will keep the parking brake from engaging or disengaging until it is replaced.

I would pass on buses with the Lucas-Girling brake system, just my $0.02. They work fine until they don't, and when they don't, well, be prepared to spend half, if not the full amount you paid for the bus, or more, to fix the brakes. But don't take my word for it -- Google 'Ford Lucas-Girling hydraulic brake system' and see what you find. Contact truck repair shops and ask them what they charge for brake system service on 2+ ton Ford trucks / buses with the Lucas-Girling system, or whether they will even touch them.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:19 PM   #13
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You're quite welcome, just trying to save you a headache. Another FYI I ran across -- SOME NaviStar (International) buses may also have that same Lucas-Girling brake system, though the actuator is of a different type. As I stated earlier, the easy way to tell is whether there is a yellow diamond-shaped air-valve knob or not. Fords and Internationals without that yellow diamond knob, you may want to stay away from. ;)

Ford and NaviStar are quite entwined with each other, going back at least to the early 1980s when Ford began offering the 6.9 IDI NaviStar diesel V-8 in its pickup trucks.

Another thing to confirm on this bus is the engine type. I've heard of skoolies having 5.9 Cummins, and they are excellent engines. However, I have never heard of one in a Ford-chassis. Perhaps someone may correct me on that one, but most I've seen were 370 / 429 gassers, 8.2 Detroit (one-off and often troublesome to repair), possibly 7.3 NaviStar, and a 6.6L diesel, which is of Brazilian manufacture and to my knowledge, pretty decent engine. The 5.9 was an option for the Dodge Ram in 1993, perhaps it was a factory option on the Ford buses as well -- just the first I've heard of one.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:40 PM   #14
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Looking a bit closer, I found this in the ad...

Lucas Bus - Run Away.jpg

Air brake systems don't have cylinders, and the seller is admitting a fluid leak. If a Lucas-Girling hydraulic system is leaking, it's a safe bet it's beginning to have big, expensive problems. Not only do leaks suck air into the system over time, brake fluid is known to attract moisture, which will rust out metal brake lines from the inside. Sorry to rain on your parade, but I would pass on this thing. Chances are, they know what's coming and are trying to dump it off on someone else. Just my $0.02.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:41 PM   #15
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Doing a google image search it looks like it’s a ford cowl. Maybe an early 90’s B600.

I was trying to buy a B600 that was on a Ritchie Brothers lot and in the catalog for auction, but the title was missing so it never did make it.

I started researching that engine. 6.6l Brazilian made, based on a New Holland tractor engine with an added turbo. If you start looking for parts, you end up going down a rabbit hole into the world of agricultural tractors. Seems like parts are rare. So maybe it has been replaced by a Cummins. I’d sure be scrutinizing that to confirm and also at the quality of the swap job.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:51 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Danjo View Post
Doing a google image search it looks like it’s a ford cowl. Maybe an early 90’s B600.

I was trying to buy a B600 that was on a Ritchie Brothers lot and in the catalog for auction, but the title was missing so it never did make it.

I started researching that engine. 6.6l Brazilian made, based on a New Holland tractor engine with an added turbo. If you start looking for parts, you end up going down a rabbit hole into the world of agricultural tractors. Seems like parts are rare. So maybe it has been replaced by a Cummins. I’d sure be scrutinizing that to confirm and also at the quality of the swap job.
Hear, hear! Ad says it is a 93 B600. I was thinking a swap when OP mentioned Cummins engine, but I kinda wonder if it might have been factory, I seem to remember seeing a late-model F-series 4-ton boxer being parted out that had a Cummins engine. However, with the seller admitting to a brake fluid leak, which introduces the dreaded Lucas-Girling brake system, in addition to the possibility of a hack job swapping in an engine (there's making it work, and then there's making it right), I would pass on this one.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:58 PM   #17
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$5000 US is $6700 Canadian - I see many similar sized buses in seemingly better condition advertised in Canada for $3000 to $4000 CAD
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:03 PM   #18
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Wowsers!
Quote:
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$5000 US is $6700 Canadian - I see many similar sized buses in seemingly better condition advertised in Canada for $3000 to $4000 CAD
How much is that in real money?
Inflation there must be terrible there. I remember that Canadian penny picture you posted elsewheres...
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:14 PM   #19
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Wowsers!How much is that in real money?
Inflation there must be terrible there. I remember that Canadian penny picture you posted elsewheres...

they claim inflation is low, and unemployment is lower than it's been in decades - while the average Joe complains about the difference in $s, the fact that the Canadian $ is lower than the US $ is actually good for our economy - better for our export industries and better for our tourism industries - when $100 US buys something worth 25% to 30% more in Canada, it takes away some of the bad taste of high fuel costs here - when I'm looking at a bus here that's listed for $4000, my first thought ( with the advice found here on the skoolie forum in the back of my mind ) that's too much for that bus, then I remember that that $4000 bus is really $3000 to most forum readers
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:42 PM   #20
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I did a bit or research and have found that if I do the work myself everything can be fixed on each side for about$600 per side. A truck mechanic may do it for $1000. Thatís some info I just got today from another member on this sight going through the same issue.
Has any found evidence of replacing them with disc brakes?

This does not encourage me to buy the bus but my circumstances do however.
I will be asking many questions when I se ether bus, and doing a lot of investigating.

My other research has lead me to believe that the 5.9 was factory supplied. Iíll look out for a chop job though.

I had been looking at Thomas vistas previous to this bus. I really like the look of them, all goofy and such.

The seller mentioned that the front brakes are in great shape but the rear are good-fair. He mentioned being a little heavy on the foot, and starting to brake a little sooner.

I know that buying a bus in haste isnít a great idea. I mentioned earlier having no home as well as no current job. I do have a savings that Iím planning to start my new journey with.
My last job was with a start up company that went bankrupt last week.
The goal with this situation is to pick it up in Oregon, drive it to San Diego to fix it up a bit. I have some work lined up if I have a bus to House me. During the fall Iíll have the real money to fix her up proper.
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