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Old 01-23-2016, 07:36 PM   #21
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Nice Rack! --- (go where you want with that one)
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Old 01-24-2016, 01:39 PM   #22
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It is pretty windy out today but I managed to wrestle the rack up onto the bus by myself. Obviously the leg layout doesn't jive with the roof ribs and it sits a little high on the existing leg brackets.





I have the leg posts that mount to the truck rails that I am going to modify and re-weld into brackets that will work and let the rack sit a little lower on the roof. I only have 4 adjustable feet but I want to make at least 6 legs (8 ideally), so I'll have to get creative with the last few brackets.

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Old 01-24-2016, 03:30 PM   #23
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Good afternoon. Just catching up to you. They company I worked for bought several of those racks for new trucks in 2010 and the men that were only hauling ladders didn't have alot of issues but the men hauling pipe had to work on them. I don't know what you plan on the rack carrying but I would like to make some recomendation's based on experience while you are already modifying it.
Any factory joints need to be welded solid, for your application I would move the front legs to the front or add a set to of legs and at the base of the feet at a minimum drill or notch the base at a minimum to drain the tubing. Most of our racks have rusted out in this short time because the tube and sleeve were not sealed and the water had nowhere to go. The tubing collects condensate inside because of the daily change in temp and retains the water internally therefore all low points rust from the inside out. For me these were meant to be ladder racks not pipe racks? I was happy I had a new truck a new with a new rack and a week in I found the load rating on the rack wasn't what it looked like? I loaded a good bit of steel pipe and took off to work no problems until I got into the town idiot's (sorry traffic).either way to make an experience story short? I got into a bind with the rack and the load on it and didn't have a welding machine with me but I did have my torches and had just picked up my company uniforms from the cleaners for the week that had steel hangers so instead of welding I set on the side of the road and braised my rack back together. Not trying to scare you but weight wise these are ladder racks! 4 out of the 6 racks we bought in 2010 have been welded or replaced because i needed something heavy duty. The holes in the post will make your rack last a lot longer because it can drain but the weep holes are going to leave rust stains and I don't have a solution other a drain piping exposed that I wouldn't want. Anything steel on your roof over time is gonna cause rust stains unless it is religiously cleaned and painted? I am a steel worker and pipe fitter welder and haven't been able to decide on a solution for a roof rack I can't afford and haven't found any aluminum ones and I have ideas for a wooden one but I don't want any holes in my roof to attach. my company has several new trucks with rust stains and hours of work done on these racks. For the trucks that need them we went back to making what we needed but the only way to stop the rust was the men have to paint there rack every couple of years if we used oil based and every year with anything else. Haven't tried powder coating but that could be an option? Sorry the post was so long but I have had some time with that brand of racks and wanted to share but didn't Meen for everything about them to come out? Hope this helps
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Old 01-24-2016, 04:14 PM   #24
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I am actually in the process of welding the joints right now! I figured I should because with the removal of the existing legs I am removing the bolted bracing which kept the joints from twisting so I have to weld the joints solid now. I'm also welding on the removable back bar since I won't need to remove it at all once it's all in place. I'll definitely drill some weep holes if there aren't any. When we first moved the rack it seemed like it had about 20lbs of frozen water in there.
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Old 01-24-2016, 04:20 PM   #25
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Okay now I have a question, or need to take a vote or whatever. The existing feet are actually about as wide as the frame ribs. Would there be any reason I can't just match the existing rivet spacing and install thru-bolts through the ribs? I was thinking about bolting just outside each rib and using spacers to not crush the roof sheeting when I snugged the bolts down, but I wonder if I might be able to just bolt through the frame. Anyone done this before?

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Old 01-24-2016, 04:42 PM   #26
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I'd go through the roof ribs just as it is. Sure, you might have to drill a few new holes or drill through some rivets, but the attachment will be strong.
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Old 01-24-2016, 05:24 PM   #27
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Use something in between for water proofing even if it is some real good caulking. You have good ideas with spacers as needed. A piece of pipe cut to length over the bolt is the best spacer I have ever found. A million washers is probably stronger but not cheap and remember in a moving structure you want everything to at least wiggle a little. Something solid over road time twisting and flexing is gonna need attention and could create damage? Some good silicone caulk and a piece of pipe spacer will allow all to wiggle as needed. Not an engineer for anything and on my first conversion myself but a lot of commercial construction experience for the government has helped me make some decisions especially since I have been back into work done 50,40,30, and some I did 20 years ago. Structures move and create problems on anything that is solid.
We are building on a flexible platform so anything we do needs to have room to flex. Don't cut anything perfect. This is just my opinion use what you need and ignore the rest
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:19 PM   #28
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Year: 1990
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Nice bus Davo! Just catching up as well. I have a similar G-30, although mine is a 1990 with a 6.2L diesel. I had the same heater you have. I have disconnected it from the plumbing, but yet to remove it. The previous owner gutted mine and put a bed platform and shelving in. I have been intending to revamp it, but camped in it as is this past year. Your build is inspiring. Please keep up with the updates.
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Old 01-24-2016, 06:58 PM   #29
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Okay for some reason I thought the ribs were like an I-section rather than more of a U-shaped hat channel, I guess I should have just popped a panel off and saw for myself, which I did right after I asked the question, oops!

Anyways, it looks like I'll be fine bolting straight through the center portion of the foot, through the rib, and install the washers and nuts on the inside. So now I have 4 adjustable feet on there now to get it up on the bus and fit, then I'll add 4 additional brackets in place later on before I load it at all, 8-3/8" bolts will be plenty, mostly I'll just have some luggage or my 2 kayaks that only weight about 75lbs. I do plan on using a teflon or rubber bearing pad under each foot.

What I am wondering now (because one bad idea leads to another, of course) is if the bolts I got were long enough to be able to put plate brackets on the inside I can hang a hammock from...we'll see!

For now I'm still welding up the frame. I had to run to HD to get another spool of wire. It's just now starting to get dark so if I can get the welds cleaned and painted and get the rack up on the roof I'll bolt it down tomorrow! My welder duty cycle was up so I had time to run in and post.
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Old 01-24-2016, 09:49 PM   #30
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I'd suggest a good layer of Seam Sealer under the brackets around the bolts. Even a tiny opening can channel a lot of water into unwanted places at highway speed.
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