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Old 08-11-2017, 07:28 PM   #11
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Marine ply is the only way to go in my book. These rigs are gonna get wet (rain, spills, plumbing leaks, etc. ) and everything you build out will be sitting on top of it. Not the place to scrimp.
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Old 08-11-2017, 07:36 PM   #12
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I made the mistake of not sealing all my windows before floors. I ruined an area in the garage. Also had a minor flood while working on plumbing. Hit the same spot in the garage. Goodbye $2/sq.ft. I had to pull out a dehumidifier and leave it there for a few days. Definitely would have been a good idea to use marine ply.
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Old 08-14-2017, 08:37 AM   #13
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pacific northwet...perhaps marine is overkill, but my recent experience removing rotten ply flooring and seeing all the different caulkings used by the school district on all the body seams concerns me...not insulating...just thinking a boat on wheels in case the creek rises.
Better over than under.

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Oh one more thing I'm all about overkill then you won't have to redo it. Again smart
You're going to need 10 sheets to do a 40 foot bus. The difference in price isn't going to break the bank (hopefully).

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I made the mistake of not sealing all my windows before floors. I ruined an area in the garage. Also had a minor flood while working on plumbing. Hit the same spot in the garage. Goodbye $2/sq.ft. I had to pull out a dehumidifier and leave it there for a few days. Definitely would have been a good idea to use marine ply.
In a complete flood, I dunno if any wood is the right wood. It's still going to soak up water and possibly swell a little. Marine grade just isn't going to rot like the non treated.
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Old 08-14-2017, 09:16 AM   #14
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finally, vinyl, rotten subfloor pulled, screw/bolt holes sealed, steel primed...now ready for new subfloor...any advice or cautions on sealing marine ply and then using liquid nails instead of making new screw holes in the steel floor?
I like your style if I can afford it I'll use Marine grade as well. And as far as the holes go I think most methods with something flat (I like to call it the bridge) over something hat adheres wel to metal should seal them. Also I think screws or bolts are overkill, liquid nails should work just fine. I've had success in our last bus with a complete floating floor, I mean after all the stuff we end up putting on top of the floor there's no way its coming up. We lived with a floating floor for two years in our first bus and saw no problems, the only thing I worried about was the seams or corners curling up, but I used OSB in our first bus and I would NEVER touch that stuff again because when it gets wet it swells, an will never go back to normal.


Looking good!
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Old 08-14-2017, 10:34 AM   #15
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[QUOTE=Brewerbob;219300]Better over than under.

You're going to need 10 sheets to do a 40 foot bus. The difference in price isn't going to break the bank (hopefully).


sure glad my bus is a shorty...4 sheets better match my budget.
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Old 08-14-2017, 11:18 AM   #16
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sure glad my bus is a shorty...4 sheets better match my budget.
Remember that when you're trying to shove one more cabinet for storage in there.

Shorties definitely have their place (especially in parking lots) but I want to try and live in mine. I'm not claustrophobic but might become so if I had to live in a shortie.
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Old 08-14-2017, 11:29 AM   #17
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Remember that when you're trying to shove one more cabinet for storage in there.

Shorties definitely have their place (especially in parking lots) but I want to try and live in mine. I'm not claustrophobic but might become so if I had to live in a shortie.


true that.
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Old 08-14-2017, 05:04 PM   #18
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When I laid down marine ply on my shorty I used adhesive plus a few screws. Where I spent a little more time was on the joints. I used my router and glued bisquits into all the joined edges to keep them flat and flush. I will be putting raised dot rubber Pirelli tile throughout and don't want anything popping or buckling up later.
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Old 08-14-2017, 06:31 PM   #19
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When I laid down marine ply on my shorty I used adhesive plus a few screws. Where I spent a little more time was on the joints. I used my router and glued bisquits into all the joined edges to keep them flat and flush. I will be putting raised dot rubber Pirelli tile throughout and don't want anything popping or buckling up later.
thanks for the tip...also finishing with the pirelli sounds a perfect solution for your vintage bus.
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Old 08-14-2017, 07:31 PM   #20
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I will be putting raised dot rubber Pirelli tile
Sure does meet almo$t all the requirements- flexible, comfortable, easy to clean, soundproof...

Am flooring shopping myself.

Pirelli info
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