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Old 03-06-2019, 09:56 AM   #11
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Foot of the siskiyou mountains Oregon.
Posts: 68
Year: 1989
Coachwork: Thomas / international
Chassis: International
Engine: Dt 360/ spicer 5 speed
Rated Cap: 42
Another 28' 7window Thomas international dognose.
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Old 03-06-2019, 10:35 AM   #12
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Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Damascus, OR
Posts: 600
Year: 2004
Chassis: International
Engine: T444e w/ 2000 Allison Trans
Rated Cap: 35
like others have said, my front bumper to behind the drivers seat is 9ft in my International. 8 window 29 total feet, with 19.5ft of living space.

I am curious about the gas powered choice. is it because you are up north in the cold and worry about diesel gelling? might be hard to find gas powered bus unless it is older. most of them I have seen are diesel. best of luck!!!
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Old 03-06-2019, 11:34 AM   #13
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Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 1,388
Chassis: still looking for my bus
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Originally Posted by Rovobay View Post
like others have said, my front bumper to behind the drivers seat is 9ft in my International. 8 window 29 total feet, with 19.5ft of living space.

I am curious about the gas powered choice. is it because you are up north in the cold and worry about diesel gelling? might be hard to find gas powered bus unless it is older. most of them I have seen are diesel. best of luck!!!
seems to be a few gas powered buses available in western Canada and buses both gas and diesel with 5 speed standard transmissions are fairly common - I'm also hoping that the buses from Alberta and Saskatchewan will have the heavy insulation package and perhaps long gearing because of the distances some of them have to drive - my plans for my skoolie/toy hauler are to head north in the winter - lots of -40 nights and not a lot warmer in the day time - settlements are far apart, sometimes over 100 miles, so if I have a breakdown on the road I'd rather be driving something I have a chance to fix myself, or with help from the nearest settlement - do I know what I'm doing? - not really, just trying to reason it out from my past experience driving motor homes or trucks, or loaded pickups pulling trailers in -40 -50 weather - it can get dangerous if you haven't planned ahead well - of course I do carry my own tow truck - lol
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:07 PM   #14
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 139
I had a friend that confirmed the temperatures you're speaking of. He moved furniture and said if he touched any metal with bare skin, it would peel off instantly.
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:24 PM   #15
Bus Crazy
 
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Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: south east BC, close to the Canadian/US border
Posts: 1,388
Chassis: still looking for my bus
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Originally Posted by Kinson View Post
I had a friend that confirmed the temperatures you're speaking of. He moved furniture and said if he touched any metal with bare skin, it would peel off instantly.
exactly, 10/30 oil won't pour, diesel trucks are left running 24/7 - oil changes on diesel run equipment are done in a hurry without shutting off the motors, cars and pickups are left running in safeway parking lots as the owners shop for groceries - propane freezes - I was in Ft Simpson in the NWT to race the same year the Pope was to fly in, in honour of something or other - they had to cancel the visit that year because of the cold - I had to use a tiger torch under the oil pan to warm up the engine enough to get it started, my 10-30 oil did no more than exhibit a blob of jelly when I tried to pour it and it had been protected from the weather in the back seat of my crew cab - houses were all heated by oil furnaces, and oil was twice the price than it was in southern Canada - as cold as it was, there were local kids, dressed in warm jackets, but not parkas, warm up pants, running shoes and ball caps that were rough housing and playing around the bonfire, while even the mushers were dressed arctic style - lol
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