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Old 05-08-2019, 07:12 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 21
I pulled the trigger on my shortie today

After much research, being outbid, having a bus sold out from under me etc etc I got one today. It’s a 2001 GMC 3500 gas with 5 windows and about 58k miles.

The current problem is that it is dripping brake fluid from one line. I can add fluid and drive it for awhile. However there’s three hours of hills between where it is and my house. Does anyone know of a “flex seal” or “jb weld” that will hold the leak for a ride home.

The man I bought it from is going to try and plug it this weekend. I hope to go out next weekend and bring it back.

Also anyone know about how much it would be to have all the brake lines swapped out?
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:21 PM   #2
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: New Hampshire
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Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas 4 window w/lift
Chassis: G30
Engine: 350 Chevy
Rated Cap: 10K
A temporary roadside breakdown fix could involve pinching off the offending brakeline with vicegrips to stop a leak.
This type of fix disables the braking to whichever wheel it goes to.
I would try to fix it if it were on a front wheel rather than pinch it off, but it could also be done in front to get home.
No adhesive or epoxy chemical fix would work reliably on a leaking brakeline.
Good luck and drive carefully if you go that route...
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:23 PM   #3
Mini-Skoolie
 
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Thanks I was just watching people do that on YouTube. It one of the back wheels.
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Old 05-08-2019, 07:35 PM   #4
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Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: E Central Tejas
Posts: 1,997
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: IH 3800, 8 window
Engine: T444E w/ Spicer 5-speed MT
Rated Cap: I prefer broad-brims hats
I suspect, if 1outta 4 is gonna fail, better it isn't a steer tire, and the wonky handling that could result.
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Originally Posted by Outlawfarmer View Post
Thanks I was just watching people do that on YouTube. It one of the back wheels.
Cute bus, kudos!

Can the offending line be isolated and plugged at the brake manifold? Prolly not worth the effort, since it sounds like a seam is splitting, and'll need replaced any way.

Might consider doing 'em all, unless there's evidence of a trauma to the bad line, only.

My dos centavos...
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Old 05-09-2019, 12:59 AM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
As haz.matt.1960 said, you have a really cute bus!
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Old 05-09-2019, 05:57 AM   #6
Bus Crazy
 
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Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: E Central Tejas
Posts: 1,997
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: IH 3800, 8 window
Engine: T444E w/ Spicer 5-speed MT
Rated Cap: I prefer broad-brims hats
With that short body, the rear looks disproportionately large.
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As haz.matt.1960 said, you have a really cute bus!
Then again, I am an aficionado of big butts...
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Old 05-09-2019, 09:14 AM   #7
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Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 329
Year: 2004
Coachwork: Corbeil
Chassis: Ford
Engine: Ford PowerStroke Diesel 6.0
Rated Cap: GVWR 11,500
Quote:
Originally Posted by Outlawfarmer View Post
After much research, being outbid, having a bus sold out from under me etc etc I got one today. It’s a 2001 GMC 3500 gas with 5 windows and about 58k miles.
I have a younger Ford cousin to this bus - 2004 Ford/Corbeil. Mine has a wheelchair lift and side door, too, but otherwise I'd imagine there are a ton of similarities. Major pros for Corbeil buses are the extensive use of screws, as opposed to rivets, and ALUMINUM! Aluminum body panels, ceiling skins and floor pans mean you have significantly less to worry about with regards to rust.

I obtained the a set of (nearly complete) wiring diagrams from Collins (purchased Corbeil a few years back) that are shared here:

Corbeil Electrical Schematic

Corbeil Multiplex Schematic

Best of luck with your build! I'm no expert, but I may have answers if you have questions about your new rig!
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