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Old 10-02-2016, 10:48 PM   #141
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
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Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
I put a 35į folded piece of polyiso (about 20" long)in my windshield wiper... When it touches the wall, I stop! My front bumper is 2" from the wall... Enough for the articulation of rear air bag inflation/deflation
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Old 10-02-2016, 11:46 PM   #142
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Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Kent, WA (Seattle)
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Year: 1987
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Originally Posted by milkmania View Post
I put a 35į folded piece of polyiso (about 20" long)in my windshield wiper... When it touches the wall, I stop! My front bumper is 2" from the wall... Enough for the articulation of rear air bag inflation/deflation
Very good food for thought, I need to rig something similar. I was thinking tennis balls and strings but I maybe I"ll just use polyiso scrap and strings.
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Old 10-03-2016, 03:25 PM   #143
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Chassis: Blue Bird
Engine: ISC 8.3
It's single-use, but here's a car parking sensor that works pretty well.
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Old 10-03-2016, 05:37 PM   #144
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That worked out super well in the video. Maybe I'll keep a few balloons for some sort of parallel parking situation I may run into during the future. I'm sure cops won't get suspicious at all.
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Old 10-14-2016, 06:55 PM   #145
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Join Date: Oct 2014
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Year: 1987
Alright, I've had a good past week and my day off yesterday was phenomenal.

Here's how it's all gone down. I got the first layer of insulation in the bus. What you see here is a 1 inch of polyiso with a reflectix radiant barrier between the insulation and the outer metal. I intend to put another inch in after doing some framing and running some logistics. I believe it's best to have a 1/8~3/4 airgap to make the reflectix insulation effective, however I did not do that. I purchased 100 feet of the reflectix on a whim so I figured I should use it. It's pretty fun and satisfying to work with.





Meanwhile I've put some time in at work to organize each of my appliances into a lego style build chart with a build materal list as well. Google sketchup is an amazing free tool that's very intuitive to use. I have had a lot of good success by grouping excessively and making way too many layers.









From here I proceeded to catalog all the necessary parts in a spreadsheet (I used both excel and google sheets for this), I color coded everything for the next step.



I then sorted everything (excel: data-sort numerically). I also divided everything into groups, so 44, 42 or 45 inches would all fall into the "48 inch group". My maximum loss I believe is 6 inches. Which is a lot but I'm okay with that.



With my material list i calculated I would need about 550 feet of square tubing. I then assumed I would need another 250 feet for various cabinetry and losses (If I go that route) and then calculated that with the price break I'd get at 1000 feet of tubing, it would only cost me $40 for the additional 200 feet, so I ordered 1000 feet of 16 gauge 1" square tubing at 13.55/20ft, and 100 feet of 1/8, 1" angle iron at 15.50/20ft

I also found a desperate need for a "shop computer", so I scored one of my co-workers cosmetically broken alienware laptop for $100. It's got a 2.4ghz i5, 4gb of ram, broken screen and broken "c" key on keyboard. I got the mouse and keyboard for $1 each at RE-PC computer recycling store. I setup the shelves accordingly. I also mostly(no cloud yet) setup a 4 channel security system but I forgot to take pictures of it.



So with all this crap setup, I screwed in the navigator seat and my wife and I went over to specialty metals yesterday to pickup our metal! Below is what 1100 feet of various metals look like in a 20 foot bundle. It all went down super smoothly.



So funny story about yesterday. Apparently there's been a bunch of storm advisories for "the biggest storm in years". I'm not one to give into the hype on the news, but I was really sad that my drivers side windshield wiper was not working(I'll probably bring this up again later). Luckily the metal shop is about 4 miles from my house so we were able to get there trouble free. Of the 3 or 4 times I went to varying hardware stores yesterday I thought it was funny that everyone is getting candles and generators and I'm buying cutoff wheels to cut all this metal. It's also good to note that I was blessed to have a brief rainstorm and 3 days of sun preceding this storm, this gave me time to find leaks, stress over them, buy some automotive seam sealer (3m 8500) and seal the leaks, kinda, some spots still leak a little though. At this point I'm probably just going to lather it all over the troublesome areas extremely liberally.

The rain did cause a lot of inconveniences and problems though. My wife encouraged me to use a tarp to protect the passage between the bus and the garage. So I used my goto sailing knots to rig up a tarp to my bus's roof deck. The tarp had holes but was EXTREMELY useful. I am so glad I spent the 15 minutes needed to make this happen.



With this done I pumped the tunes, cracked a beer, and went to town. I started this project around 3:30 and Finished at midnight. I took about 90 minutes of breaks to hardware stores and takeout food.



I setup a metal inventory spreadsheet on the shop computer to help me keep track of everything I needed to cut. After every few cuts I would go into the laundry room and punch in however many cuts I made below the corresponding lengths. Towards the end I developed a nice tally system that let me keep track of 80 feet worth of cuts before reporting my cuts. I was averaging around 45-50 seconds per cut, including all the side work. By the time I was done I drank about 20 ounces of water in 4 chugs, it was pretty intense.



About 80% of the finished cuts (the rest is scattered in various nooks and crannys).



To top it off we even returned the bus to it's original parking spot and got it mostly re-leveled before 1am.

Here's a picture of the bus I took last night before I returned it to it's original parking spot. It looks much better during the day.

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Old 10-19-2016, 05:27 AM   #146
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Location: Eugene OR
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Inspired

Hey Taolik,
I'm just starting my own conversion of a Thomas 8 window that is pretty similar to yours. I just wanted to say thanks for all the detailed explanations and pictures. I've gotten a lot for reading this thread. Can't wait to see more!
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Old 10-19-2016, 02:59 PM   #147
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Originally Posted by Willamette View Post
Hey Taolik,
I'm just starting my own conversion of a Thomas 8 window that is pretty similar to yours. I just wanted to say thanks for all the detailed explanations and pictures. I've gotten a lot for reading this thread. Can't wait to see more!
Hey thanks Willamette! The internet is full of better threads but I'm glad my build could be of assistance. As someone who spent probably the best 5 years of my life down in Eugene, your name really strikes a chord for me. I have been looking forward to making a pilgrimage back with the bus, maybe we can meet up and have a bus party when that day comes. Until then best of luck with your build!
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Old 11-25-2016, 07:15 PM   #148
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Join Date: Oct 2014
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Year: 1987
Alright Friends! Happy holidays and I hope we're ready for some updates.

First off: I got drunk about a month ago (nothing unusual) and decided to take out the last original schoolbus back window featured here. I giggled about it, cheered my bus and went to bed.

I woke up the next day cautious of my actions with a little bit of regret. Drilled a handful of holes before work, slapped some butyl putty down, cleco'd everything into place, and rivetted it with pop rivets the next day and welded it to the frame.

These are pretty ugly welds, but I think it will be fine.



After developing a small amount of confidence to my work, I have celebrated by changing my signature and promoting a website which I recently put together. I try to give credit where due, but if you feel you deserve some credit let me know and I'll adjust accordingly.

I hope you all don't judge me, but I will be copying a lot of my posts from the website onto this board, these posts may reflect a little more confidence than I have in the past. Mostly to pretend I have a backbone on my webpage I guess.

Without Further adieu

Most recent picture
Hereís a picture I snapped this morning.



How did we get here?

This is where our journey begins. Last we left off we were around here. What we see is an inch of insulation over a layer of reflectix (see shiny bubble wrap on floor) and a layer of another radiant barrier I got off amazon (I will not link for I am not certain how necessary these were).



My favorite insulation test I have been using is the touch test. I touch a surface, if it is cold it lacks insulation, if it is not then I am pleased that it is insulated. I may further insulate anyway. The white steel studs between the insulation panels were FRIGID. This is something that needed to be addressed.

Insulating the steel stud/frame

Aaronsb of the skoolie.net forum used foam tape as well as foil tape over it and conducted some condensation tests to conclude that the foam tape with the foil tape reduces condensation. I put some foam tape over these steel studs and my touch test was enough to conclude that it is effective. The cost for this foam tape is not anything as cost effective as 1/2 inch polyiso. But it is convenient I suppose and I did it with all of the exposed steel I could find.

One Layer Steel Stud Taped


A few Steel studs taped


Foil Taping over the foam 1/2



Foil taping over the foam 2/2


Furring Strips(walls): Reducing Thermal Bridging/stopping airflow

The touch test makes it very clear that thermal bridging is a very real thing. I know I canít get rid of it all, but I want to reduce as much as possible. My method for this was running long 4 foot lengths of reflectix across the bus and fastening them to the frame with furring strips. These furring strips serve a few purposes.

1. Provide an interior skeleton in which things can be fastened to, and reducing thermal bridging by providing a thermal break from the exterior bus frame, and the interior framing.

2. Fasten the reflectix to the walls.

3. Structurally reinforce the bus (slightly)

A note on Furring strips, The 99 1◊3 cent furring strips at home depot didnít seem like something I wanted to rely on for all the interior framing, there are also a lot of online reviews complaining about their fragile nature. I also wanted something with a comparable thickness to 1″ polyiso insulation which I want to put between the furring strips with a snug fit. I ended up getting a good deal on 5/4 cedar decking board from a hardware store. The cost was a little under $3 for an 8 foot length. Iíll take it. It looks and smells great! No regrets.



The furring strips are about 3.5 inches thick and I wanted the centers of the wood to be spaced about 16″ apart so I cut some 12.5″ long 2◊2ís to use for spacing the strips apart evenly and mostly level. (I forgot to document this) These are all fastened to the wall with 1.5″ #8 Self taping metal steel screws. I countersunk each of the holes so all of these screws are sunk into the wood. In theory I am going to cover the screws with foam to reduce condensation/thermal bridging, in theory.

Ceiling Insulation

Much like the walls, the ceiling is insulated with radiant barrier, reflectix (another radiant barrier), and 2x 1/2″ polyiso insulation (easier to bend and 10% more expensive than 1″ polyiso). One thing I really liked about using many layers of thin insulation is that the pieces often overlap each other in a manner which compliment the imperfections of each others cuts.

Radiant Barrier 1. Down


2. Reflectix over radiant barrier


Two radiant barriers with no airgap? A lot of people are probably shaking their heads in disapproval at my waste of resources and time. Yes I am guilty of all of the above, however the radiant barrier was leftover from my flooring and taking up space in my garage, and the reflectix passed the touch test well. Overkill also provides some garage cleaning benefits.

Ceiling Insulation in!



Yes I know, the bus is a mess



Foaming the ceiling frames.


You may notice in the picture above that the foam and frame sticks out more than the 1″ of insulation in some areas. This drove my crazy so I decided to fill in this space another 1/2″ of insulation. This was much harder to fit in because I used scraps and also didnít have much framing to pressure fit (push/punch) the insulation between.

Furring Strips for the Ceiling

The first 3 strips were absolutely terrible to put in. These 3 strips here took me about 90 minutes to put in. I was absolutely furious by the end of this night.



The next day I was blessed to have a helper buddy Scott help me out here. Here you see him Taping the foam with foil tape. Note: I tried foiling tape both: underneath the last layer of insulation for some of the frame foam and over the last layer of insulation. I never figured out which one I liked more, I donít think it really mattered too much.



Bless this hero. Get this man a beer!

We used 2◊4ís and 2◊6ís approximately 6í6″. Extremely useful for pretty much anything that went over our heads (literally).



The day after this Scott helped me work until 1:30 am, what a guy right?

Kregg Jigg Shoutout

A shoutout to Kregg Pocket Jigg R3 I got this on sale for $40 with clamp, the kregg clamp really isnít necessary but that specific clamp does fit satisfyingly well with the clamp. This jigg makes these pocket holes which create these beautiful joints. I connected most of my furring strips to one another with these connections.



Checkpoint!

Here are some pictures of our wonderful checkpoint we reached.





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Old 11-25-2016, 08:28 PM   #149
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Join Date: May 2015
Location: Oklahoma aka "God's blind spot"
Posts: 1,687
Year: 1989
Coachwork: 1853FC International/Navistar
Chassis: 35' Retired Air Force Ambulance
Engine: DT466, MT643
Rated Cap: 6 souls and a driver
That build makes me wish I didn't have to live in mine during conversion!
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Old 11-26-2016, 12:26 AM   #150
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Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 4,562
Year: 1946
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Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
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Lookin' good. And gotta love those Kregs. And I am guessing your combination of the poly and reflectix should provide mighty nice insulation values.
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