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Old 02-24-2016, 07:00 PM   #21
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Kent, WA (Seattle)
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Year: 1987
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Originally Posted by sdwarf36 View Post
Blue circle-right side--flasher?

Thank you, that's a very good lead!
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Old 02-24-2016, 08:02 PM   #22
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Location: Salt Lake City Utah
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Year: 2000
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Originally Posted by TAOLIK View Post
Tango, I like the idea of the heatgun, do you think it would be realistic of me to rivet one or two corners in before heating it? Then have my wife stand over me with a heatgun while I go to town?
Late to the party on this one.. my excuse is that just yesterday I went out chasing a deal for just this purpose. I picked up an unwanted (free!) freestanding electric oven/range from a place about 10 minutes from my work. I'm planning to pull its bake and broil heating elements, plus the high-temperature connectors and wiring and maybe the little mounting clips, and build some apparatus for heating 4x10 foot sheet metal panels while riveting them into place on my bus. Haven't decided yet whether to adapt the oven controller too for temperature control, or do it the old-fashioned way with an IR thermometer and switching the power on and off manually.

If I don't burn the place down, then I'll post pictures on my build thread!
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Old 02-24-2016, 09:08 PM   #23
Skoolie
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
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Originally Posted by family wagon View Post
Late to the party on this one.. my excuse is that just yesterday I went out chasing a deal for just this purpose. I picked up an unwanted (free!) freestanding electric oven/range from a place about 10 minutes from my work. I'm planning to pull its bake and broil heating elements, plus the high-temperature connectors and wiring and maybe the little mounting clips, and build some apparatus for heating 4x10 foot sheet metal panels while riveting them into place on my bus. Haven't decided yet whether to adapt the oven controller too for temperature control, or do it the old-fashioned way with an IR thermometer and switching the power on and off manually.

If I don't burn the place down, then I'll post pictures on my build thread!
That's a brilliant idea, but I don't have the cojones to even think about doing such a thing.
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Old 02-25-2016, 02:57 AM   #24
Skoolie
 
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Year: 1987
alright, so I just successfully removed my electric console! However I'm left with this anxiety in my gut about removing the heaters. Is there anything special I should do to drain the heaters further? I plan on unscrewing the radiator tomorrow to drain some coolent. Google suggests I flush it with a hose/ crank the engine: should I do this to drain it entirely?

I plan to loop out the rear heater and plug the front heaters back in after insulating and re-plywooding

I'd love to hear your input, for now I'll sleep on my tomorrow thoughts.
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Old 02-25-2016, 07:54 AM   #25
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Join Date: Nov 2015
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i used some clamps on mine.. but since you may be leaving it a while thats probly not the best option (although it can definitely help reduce your mess if you clamp around any cuts you make then unclamp while its over a bucket)

mine has shutoff valves right where it comes of of the block, if you have those just shut them off and all you have to drain is heater cores and hoses.. otherwise maybe find a way to plug up the feed and return hoses somehow so you dont have to fool with draining
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Old 02-25-2016, 05:05 PM   #26
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The list of wiring that starts with "to master override" is all part of the 8-way crossover warning lights. Most likely at one time it was stuck to the side of the flasher unit (most likely a Wheldon product). Unless you want to power the crossover lights as super turn signals, or really high mounted stop lamps, or clear lights for yard lighting you won't need any of that wiring in the future.

The two units that are circled in blue are most likely buzzers for emergency doors or lift door open. To determine if they are buzzers find a 12-vdc hot source and jump a wire to one of the terminals to see what happens.

They may also be relays to carry the juice to the crossover lights. The switch on the dash only starts the crossover light process in the flasher unit. It requires a relay to carry the juice to the lights. In many of the older units the lights were sealed beam light bulbs like headlights. Two pairs flashing on and off takes a lot of juice, too much juice for a simple switch.

In all of your electrical mess don't forget what you are working on currently is just the bus stuff. The IHC electrical panel should be just to the left of the glove box. Inside that panel should be fuses for things like the horn, head lights, tail lights, turn signals, etc. Somewhere under the dashboard you will find the two flasher units that operate the turn signals and 4-way emergency flashers. You will also find where the body and the chassis wiring harness all comes together.

In regards to your heaters, it is all pretty simple stuff. Each heater will have at least two wires going to each fan unit (high and low). Sometimes the wiring will go from one fan to the next so you might only have two wires for two fans. Two fans with four wires means each fan is controlled separately. Two fans with two wires means both fans are controlled together.

As far as the coolant is concerned, do NOT leave the system dry or with just water in the system. Dry can cause the heater cores and radiator core to rot out. Just water can cause major problems with rust in the cooling system and the possibility of freezing and breaking something expensive like the engine block. The easiest way to deal with the system is to use a plastic or metal double ended hose barb fitting and some hose clamps to circle the system. Using shutoffs will work only if there is a shut off leaving the engine and going back into the engine. Most shutoffs I have seen were just on the leaving the engine side and not a second one on the going back into the engine side.

Make sure the pH in the coolant is neutral. Too much in either direction can cause problems with electrolysis inside the engine.

While you have the ceiling panels out make sure you double check the welds on the roof bows where they meet the body above the window rail. Carpenter buses were involved in a recall due to faulty roof bow welds. Many buses were surplussed rather than fixed because the fix was going to cost more than the buses were worth--Carpenter was out of business and wasn't going to pay for any recall repairs.
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Old 02-26-2016, 04:07 PM   #27
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Join Date: Oct 2014
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So first off Leo3000 and cowlitzcoach, thank you for your advice. Leo3000: I ended up following your advice and finishing my objectives, and I related to your choice of words about fooling with the radiator. Cowlitzcoach: Thank you for the thorough response, all new information for me and it gives me a lot to think about. The "do not leave the system dry" is a little disconcerting, so I'm hoping for your opinions regarding what I did.

I guess my first question is, do these look like shutoff valves to you? They are screws that are about 1 inch long, with fixed wingnut heads on top.


Your opinions matter a lot, but I went ahead and assumed they were shut off valves, screwed them down and proceeded with my work.

Despite my commitment to drain the radiator, I did not watch a youtube video, like I probably should've. I just assumed the radiator drain would be similar to an oil drain. Inconveniently, I found this under the radiator which supported my half-witted logic.

I was disappointing to unscrew the bolt to this


Anyway I monkeyed around with this bolt for way too long, and eventually gave up when I lost my temper. I resorted to plan B which was to shut off the "shut off valves" (I'm eager to hear if those are actually shut off valves), and went to town.

Removing the rear heater was easy enough, I clamped the hoses as Leo advised, and pulled them off. The spillage was modest, and promptly wiped up with rag and mop. The front driver side heater was very unpleasant to remove. I dropped a lot of tasteless profanity while hunched beneath the steering wheel, hoping that someone would hear my cry for help and shower me with sympathy - Nana was supportive and patient. Anyway it took awhile but I got her out(the heater).

The passenger side front heater was a little bit easier, and we got her out alright. I did my best to keep the mess contained, but predictably I did spill some coolant here and there. A lot of ragging and wiping went down yesterday, really glad I got a few extra buckets laying around.

It's worth noting, that I ruined a lot of radiator hoses prying them off with a screw driver, I think it's within my best interest to replace the hoses when I reattach the heaters, including the ones that go to the engine block, I don't think this will be too hard- but I also hardly have a clue to what I'm doing. After I disconnected everything, I stuffed all the open holes with plastic bags to avoid bugs or something crawling into the hoses (my gold standard of logic in action).

The front drivers side heater out, with stereo related cables in the plastic crate above it.

The front passenger side heater out.


The front area without heaters, drivers seat, and electrical console


A close up on my wire bucket carrying most of the wires from the electrical console


A selfie with me and the electrical console removed Wednesday night: happiness level 70%


A photo of my makeshift shop table with two sawhorses I got for $5 and a wooden door I found in a dumpster.



I'm expecting to leave this setup as is for about 3 weeks, so I can insulate and re-wood the flooring before reconnecting the heaters (with new hoses). Do you guys think it's okay or am I risking damaging some part of my bus? I eagerly await your opinions! Thanks everyone for all your help so far.
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Old 02-26-2016, 06:55 PM   #28
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Nope-you're doing fine so far.
Depending on how nice whoever put the hose on last, there is usually some slack. To remove,cut the hose length-wise about an inch or two. Now try twisting hose off. It comes right off. If you have the extra hose, now cut off the the slit piece. Now you have a fresh section of hose to slid over the barb.
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Old 02-26-2016, 07:30 PM   #29
Skoolie
 
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Thanks a ton dwarf! I really appreciate your reassurance, this reduces my anxiety by about 15% That's also very good to know. I need to verify if it's the same length, but I was thinking about using the hose used for my rear heater - but I figured I would do a cost analysis and sit on this thought until I finish insulating.
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Old 02-26-2016, 08:23 PM   #30
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The bolt you were trying to remove is a mounting bolt for the radiator. You really don't want to take it off unless you need to remove the radiator for some reason.

The butterfly's are coolant shut off valves. Since there are two they most likely shut off both directions. But double check it isn't a shut off going to a different set of heaters and not part of the same loop.

There is no need to replace all of your heater hoses unless they are rotten and sweating coolant out of them. Even if you have to cut your hoses off too short you can always splice in a piece with a double ended hose barb connector.

I noticed one thing that should be on your to do list is the air intake hose. The hose goes forward to get cooler air from outside rather than from inside the engine compartment. It will give you better HP if all of the air is coming from a cooler source--the more dense the intake air is the more air the engine will have to use. The more air the engine has to use the more efficient the burn will be. The more efficient the burn the less fuel you will need to do the same work. In other words, a very cheap HP increase.
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