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Old 04-01-2015, 09:05 AM   #131
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I don't know that its much of an argument one way or the other. Many of these buses are 20-30+ years old. If they have coats of wax on them over their lifetime, a wash with gentle dish soap won't harm them. Another point, if paint is going to be applied, wax will have to come off first. Sanding alone won't do it. Sure, I agree, if you are in an environment where you want wax as a topcoat for whatever reason, it should be reapplied after a wash.
Many years ago, I remember people washing and waxing their vehicles before a vacation trip to help with mileage. I don't know that it was proven to work but it probably prolonged the life of the paint considering the road grime etc.
I use a mix of mineral oil and Australian bees wax on the wood items I make. It adds moisure, highlights the color differences and seals/protects the wood.
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Old 04-01-2015, 09:40 AM   #132
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IMO

There is no such thing as a "Gentle Dish Soap".

Dish soap is made to cut grease. That's all I need to say.

If prepping for paint, dish soap is useless. You need to use a degreaser that is made for the job. Let's not promote short cuts that don't work.

Sanding does not degrease before painting. Degreasing is a separate step in paint prep.

Bottom line is dish soap has no place in the automotive washing. It is not the right product for the job.

We are happy for you that you like dish soap. Please don't promote this to people who don't know any better.

Nat
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Old 04-01-2015, 09:51 AM   #133
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HolyBus View Post
I don't know that its much of an argument one way or the other. Many of these buses are 20-30+ years old. If they have coats of wax on them over their lifetime, a wash with gentle dish soap won't harm them. Another point, if paint is going to be applied, wax will have to come off first. Sanding alone won't do it. Sure, I agree, if you are in an environment where you want wax as a topcoat for whatever reason, it should be reapplied after a wash.
Many years ago, I remember people washing and waxing their vehicles before a vacation trip to help with mileage. I don't know that it was proven to work but it probably prolonged the life of the paint considering the road grime etc.
I use a mix of mineral oil and Australian bees wax on the wood items I make. It adds moisure, highlights the color differences and seals/protects the wood.
"To help with mileage"? On a Ferrari, maybe! LOL anyway....
Absolutely, that's why I'm stripping the heck out of the outside now.

Do some filler work after, sand it smooth, wash it nicely, few coats of primer, paint, wax maybe

At least, that is my plan for now!
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Old 04-01-2015, 09:59 AM   #134
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
IMO

There is no such thing as a "Gentle Dish Soap".

Dish soap is made to cut grease. That's all I need to say.

If prepping for paint, dish soap is useless. You need to use a degreaser that is made for the job. Let's not promote short cuts that don't work.

Sanding does not degrease before painting. Degreasing is a separate step in paint prep.

Bottom line is dish soap has no place in the automotive washing. It is not the right product for the job.

We are happy for you that you like dish soap. Please don't promote this to people who don't know any better.

Nat
I don't think holybus is promoting anything, just describing his experience.
I do agree with you on the degreasing points. Dish soap is not the right product. Might make the outside clean and smell nice , but I think that is it.

Ask me is I ALWAYS degrease walls inside the house before I painted...specially the kitchen
But you know what? Nothing has peeled off, yet

EDIT: even though i do think cheap dish soap ruined the rubbers on my bike :P
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Old 04-01-2015, 11:12 AM   #135
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BTW i finally found the tag for the tranny. it was painted over (-_-) but readable.
It's an AT545, which i believe not many of us here are a fan of, correct?

Or is it another tranny that is..."not liked"?
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Old 04-01-2015, 04:12 PM   #136
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The Allison AT545 was an excellent tranny...in it's day. But given the demands of newer vehicles and drivers, today it is a boat anchor. No lockup, not enough gearing, terrible mpg and a host of other attributes that the newer trans nearly all overcome.

A 5 or 6 speed with full lockup is much preferred.

The 4th gen 6-speed Allisons are pretty amazing but they ain't cheap. Around $8500 new from the factory and really difficult to find used under $5-6k. What IS great about them is all they need is a electro-mechanical throttle position sensor (TPS) to work with any non-computerized engine. The previous generations called for complex homemade harnesses and some really serious program & language hacking to get them to play nice with just about any engine.
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Old 04-01-2015, 11:04 PM   #137
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Nat, nOObie is right, I am not promoting anything. I said sanding alone won't do it. Period. I did not advocate using dish soap as a prep for painting.
I did say that a vehicle that has had many coats of wax over many years won't be harmed by gentle dish soap.
If you are someone who waxes after washing, this is especially true.
Wash your bus with whatever you want. I don't care if it is MeGuiare's, Mother's, Turtle Wax, Blue Dawn, Alladin's, ArmourAll, Mr.Pink,Zymol, LiquidGlass, Rain-X, Eucerin or Arm&Hammer. Even Mr. Clean makes a car wash product.
Whatever floats your bus.
There are gentle and harsh dish soaps.
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Old 04-03-2015, 02:17 PM   #138
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Sooooo....changing gears... (Pun totally intended) about the transmission. I see the preferred way to obtain a bit more top speed with these suckers is to change the gear ratio at the differential. Has anyone looked into any chokes or governors for fuel line, or exhaust? And no, I can't take credit for this idea, as the question came from my lazy bum-poor-filthy-dumpster diving for spare parts-brother (just in case he's reading!)
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Old 04-03-2015, 03:04 PM   #139
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Hey n00b --- actually there are several ways to pick up more top end speed. More often than not, a combination gets the best results. Below are the three most common variables you have to play with.

Rear end (Ring & Pinion Ratio) - Taller gears will make you go faster at any given engine RPM...but only if the engine has enough torque to pull those gears. Typically a small change in axle ratio will yield a small improvement that most engines can handle.

Transmission Final Gear Ratio - This can be modified by going with a different tranny that has higher gearing, finding one with one or more levels of Overdrive, or by adding an auxiliary trans that multiplies what you already have (sometimes called a Brownie Box). As far as I know Brownies only work with standard trans.

Tire Diameter - Often overlooked and actually one of the cheapest fixes there is. Increasing the diameter can have a significant effect.
Example: RPM and Gearing being the same (2240 RPM x 1:1 ratio)...going two inches larger on the tires will take a vehicle from 65mph to about 69 mph.

But...before you get too deeply committed to any solution...play with the numbers on a good calculator. Lots of "what ifs" can be tested out before you spend a dime. I have used the link below with good results, especially the "Manual Entry" calc at the bottom of the page.

Engine RPM Calculator

Good luck with it pardner and let us know what you decide.
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Old 04-03-2015, 03:05 PM   #140
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Do you mean things like changing the Cummins governor spring for more RPM?

Bad Idea IMO.

More RPM = shorter engine life and more fuel burned.

As a general rule, you don't want your engine turning faster than were the torque curve peaks.

Most older Cummins are around 1600 RPM.

The At 545 auto transmission needs minimum 2000 RPM to lock the bands.

That's one of the big reasons why the AT 545 sucks.

Nat
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