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Old 05-18-2018, 05:24 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Leaving CA >Headed to Central NY
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Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Engine: Ford E350 7.3L Diesel
Wood Stove Questions

Hello! I recently acquired Buster, my little 1991 Lewis 4 window Ford/International. It's been interesting modifying my "fantasy" floor plan (made before I had a bus, when I was convinced I would end up with something slightly larger) into something that's going to work. The living space I'm working with is about 12'6" long, 6'6" wide, and 6'8" tall. Right now, I'm confused about wood stove placement.

The photo isn't my actual stove, but it's very similar in size and shape. It's about 21" x 19." If I had my druthers I might choose a smaller stove, but this one is free because I already own it. That fits my non-existent budget perfectly, and its look is in keeping with my vintage/antique aesthetics as well. I'm trying to figure out where to put it, though.

I had though I would build a stand for it that straddles the wheel well on the passenger side. But Buster has 2 gas tanks that sit in the center right between the wheel wells, one just forward and the other just behind. I like to live dangerously, but my father the firefighter might take issue with my installing a stove right on top of the tanks were he alive to see it, and I try not to piss off my father's ghost.

Where would YOU put the stove?
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Old 05-18-2018, 08:17 PM   #2
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Most people put wood stoves on the drivers side and it is a few feet away from the gas tank.
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Old 05-18-2018, 10:29 PM   #3
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That is quite a challenge you present there. Where to put the woodstove?
I'm thinking with such a small floor space, rather than in a corner or maybe against a front bulkhead, see how it looks in dead centre of your floor. Then build around that but keep the stove open enough that it radiates to all four corners. Chimney location is optional then also.

On second thought, I would not use that stove myself in a gas powered vehicle. Diesel maybe but that is not an efficient woodburner. If you need a woodstove, find the best airtight you can in a size that will work for you.
Your dad was onto something wasn't he? He's still watching out for you!

John
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Old 05-19-2018, 10:01 AM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
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And that stove is cast iron. I wouldn't want a cast iron stove in bus because cast iron is brittle and I've seen at least two cast iron stoves that were broken by some moron trying to stuff an over-sized piece of wood in. If I were you I would look for something steel, and more air tight as BlackJohn pointed out. Cast iron stoves are attractive, but they're never airtight.
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Old 05-19-2018, 11:32 AM   #5
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Is there any chance that you could find that same style stove with a single top? You would save space , and I bet you could swap it for yours.
I think the smaller stoves were used in a rail road caboose
Good luck
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Old 05-19-2018, 01:40 PM   #6
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
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Year: 1991
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Engine: Ford E350 7.3L Diesel
Hmm, lots to think about.

I don't really care about being able to cook on the stove. I'm not big on cooking. I will be in a region that gets mighty cold in winter, though. Maybe I need to rethink my heating options. As much as I love the idea of a wood stove, I'm wondering if it really is the best thing given the tiny footprint.
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Old 05-19-2018, 01:50 PM   #7
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Join Date: Jun 2013
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You haven't filled out your profile so where are you located and where is this cold region?
I would definitely keep a woodstove in mind but not yours. Could be a matter of life or death at some point, just sayinn..

John
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Old 05-19-2018, 03:00 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by firebuild View Post
Hmm, lots to think about.

I don't really care about being able to cook on the stove. I'm not big on cooking. I will be in a region that gets mighty cold in winter, though. Maybe I need to rethink my heating options. As much as I love the idea of a wood stove, I'm wondering if it really is the best thing given the tiny footprint.
How cold is "cold"?
Just a reminder, make sure your plumbing and tanks won't freeze!
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Old 05-19-2018, 04:48 PM   #9
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Wood stoves were used for lots of years in train cars.

Cast iron is brittle when cold or hot on one end cold on the other, after a year working in a foundry beating stove parts out of mold casks with a sledgehammer I can tell you they are hard to break. Badly treated old cast may have micro cracks and break along those, but a good stove can be warmed up and beat with a hammer without breaking.

If you want air tight, strip that down to parts and use fire place gasket. The cloth king of stuff

I fully intend to use a cast iron stove if I can find one I love in my budget
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Old 05-19-2018, 06:18 PM   #10
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I recently found a cast iron frying pan in a thrift store that had a crack down the sidewall and about a third of the way across the bottom. The crack started directly opposite where the handle was attached, and there was a little flat spot on the rim of the frying pan where the crack started from. It was pretty obvious that it had been dropped.

The OP did not mention what kinds of roads he plans to drivie on, but I know what kind of roads I drive on around here, and some of them are extremely rough. I would be very concerned that one of those cast iron legs would snap off on a rough road, so I would never put a cast iron stove in a bus, no matter how much I liked its looks.

Train cars don't hit bumps like we have on the back roads around here, so to me how long cast iron stoves used to last on trains is irrelevant.
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