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Old 05-23-2016, 11:44 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by skoolie_n00bie View Post
...And forget "standard" all-wheel drive....a single high-output electric motor per WHEEL!!!!
I concepted something like this with a Jeep buddy for an off-road vehicle because axles and drivelines just restrict articulation but I don't foresee that being a factor in a bus. That being said, there could be advantages such as better all-wheel traction control although the turning radius would be limited by the steering wheel limitations. I think Chevy tried an all-wheel steering pickup truck once but the fact that it's not available now suggests that there's more to the physics than just making all wheels able to pivot.
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Old 05-23-2016, 11:51 AM   #42
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I concepted something like this with a Jeep buddy for an off-road vehicle because axles and drivelines just restrict articulation but I don't foresee that being a factor in a bus. That being said, there could be advantages such as better all-wheel traction control although the turning radius would be limited by the steering wheel limitations. I think Chevy tried an all-wheel steering pickup truck once but the fact that it's not available now suggests that there's more to the physics than just making all wheels able to pivot.
Oh, i see...what if instead you'd turn the bus "tank-like", 1/2 going front, 1/2 going back? still pretty tight turn radius for a 40footer!
-OR-
switching from FWD, RWD or AWD depending or road conditions...
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Old 05-23-2016, 12:08 PM   #43
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The FWD/RWD/AWD thing is totally feasible in an electric-wheel driven vehicle.
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Old 05-23-2016, 02:35 PM   #44
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The reminded me of the "original" hybrid electric truck

Chevy-Volt-Truck-Prototype | UtterPower.com


(This is satire, btw)
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Old 05-23-2016, 02:46 PM   #45
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Myself and a friend were trying to do this about 20 years ago using electric forklift motors and batteries. Didn't have enough electrical engineering knowledge to make it happen.
Our idea was to replace the diesel engine and transmission with a diesel generator in a dog nose truck at that time, dispensing of the idea of batteries and the weight issue. Independently powering each wheel would be cool, but again the engineering on that would be spendy. Using standard axles and possibly a motor for each axle for 4x4 or front wheel drive operation seems feasible. You could even run off of one motor if you included a transfer case, but that would require going back to full drive lines in the length of the vehicle.

We were trying to do this for the basic cost of the truck and a diesel generator. We needed electric forklift motors which are available in many auctions. We were unable to interest an electrical engineer in sharing knowledge and eventually timed out on the project.

This presents a number of problems in practice because generators are designed to operate at a certain rpm range. It seems some can have the governor removed and some can't.

This project just kept getting hung up on simple problems because we didn't have enough electrical knowledge to make it happen. There may be a chance of ruining a generator by running it at lower speeds when having lower power requirements. We got as far as we did because of getting things from the auctions at low prices. Fun project that didn't fly.
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Old 05-23-2016, 03:25 PM   #46
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What you want to do is run the generator at its optimal rpm regardless what speed the vehicle is traveling. You do want some batteries so that when generator output exceeds drive demand the surplus power is stored and then when acceleration or climbing demands more power than the generator alone you have reserve power. Also, as far as putting gearing between the drive motor and the drive wheels, you could either opt for a CVT or I think a company called Speedwright makes a two-speed differential that shifts within a range of input RPM. Electric motors have full torque at 0 RPM so the only reason you should still need gearing is to use a smaller capacity motor than the vehicle size demands. An electric forklift motor can have all the torque to get it moving but tops out at maybe 8mph. Taller gears would reduce its weight capacity. If it were me, I'd be looking for salvage Priuses (Priusees? Prii?) And get one Prius motor per wheel! Still probably not enough eHP but for a shade tree project that's about the best alternative I can think of - anything else is huge industrialized motors which won't lend themselves well to a OTR application.
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