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Old 10-11-2017, 01:42 PM   #1
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Propane Gas Piping Question

What kind of piping should be used to pipe propane gas?
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Old 10-11-2017, 01:57 PM   #2
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It's been a long time since I plumbed propane in a bus and wanted to see what materials are being used these days.

I Googled the question and came across this site: Piping, Connectors and Fittings | Proprane Products | Superior Propane | Northern Arizona

Some good info on newer materials and fittings. However, no direct answer to the bus question so I called them. I spoke with an installation supervisor who told me that black iron is still the only way to go. Flexible material is just for the "whip" connecting the end of the black iron pipe to the appliance.

Hope that helps.
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Old 10-11-2017, 02:42 PM   #3
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:32 PM   #4
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I take the point about black iron, but I'd only use that in a fixed, non-moving installation. It's heavy, fat and difficult to route in small spaces. If it gets salt water on it, it will corrode.

RVs have been fitted with small diameter copper pipe for generations, quite successfully.

Just make sure the line to the biggest demand has sufficient diameter to carry enough gas.

Flexible line should only be used from the regulator on the bottle to the nearest fixed point, probably a manifold.

There may be differences of opinion on this, so use Google for a variety of views and pick the one you feel most comfortable with.
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Old 10-11-2017, 03:50 PM   #5
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All of the RV's (4) I have owned have use black iron for propane. Last I checked, RVIA allows black iron. The one parked in my driveway right now has 28 year old black iron. So far it has held up fine. I will keep an eye on it though.

Heck, I even saw Marathon installing black iron propane pipe in a $ 1.1 million custom coach.

Flexible copper has it's own issues.

I think that I will stick with black iron
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Old 10-11-2017, 05:54 PM   #6
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Copper is notorious for "work hardening" and cracking after much exposure to vibration.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:22 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty View Post
Please be safe ! Just a reminder for those who haven't read this post:

http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f11/th...html#post94041

^That's some scary stuff.

I tried to bend and flange my own copper for propane once. Realized it was a mess and threw it out.
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Old 10-11-2017, 06:49 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Tango View Post
Copper is notorious for "work hardening" and cracking after much exposure to vibration.
Yet in practise it has been used, and is still used, in both American and European RVs with no ill effects, and has been for decades.
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Old 10-11-2017, 07:11 PM   #9
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Yet in practise it has been used, and is still used, in both American and European RVs with no ill effects, and has been for decades.
I think it's a matter of properly isolating it from vibrations and repeated bends.

There is always Cupronickel tubing, as well. Raypak uses it in swimming pool heaters.
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Old 10-13-2017, 02:38 AM   #10
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i work in the oil and gas industry in canada. theres only 2 things we use. black iron pipe or stainless.

stainless is expensive but if you can get your hands on some heavy wall stainless tubing that might just be your other solution.

i do know copper is still used too. once again. try get the heavy wall stuff. type k i believe.

personally. all my propane is running short distances and ill have full access to it at all times so i picked up a few hoses, tees, and fittings until i can find some spare stainless or black iron pipe floating around work that i can aquire for free.
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