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Old 11-21-2016, 09:23 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
This has all got me thinking.. I now want a liquid draw propane tank!

I've been using typical 20lbers mounted under the bus. In the winter the vapour flow from the tanks noticeably decreases. A liquid-draw tank with an indoor regulator vaporizer would eliminate this problem. Interesting...
The forklift styles mounted horizontally giving a much larger surface area, as well as more than double the volume, will alleviate that problem for sure, unless you're talking Alaskan winter or something.

Some people put an electric blanket type heat source around tanks when it gets that cold , pretty expensive if you aren't on Mains power. But a hose with some warm water running through it wrapped a few times around a tank would do the same thing, just don't even think about bringing tanks inside the enclosed space with human beings.
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Old 11-21-2016, 09:26 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Geo Jeff View Post
A small flame on the bottom of a propane tank like fridge uses to heat the ammonia would do wonders as well. Give up a small amount of energy to get the gas out. anything above -41f is making it better. Sounds weird to have small flame on a tank but in a pinch it could save your life. a hand held propane torch on its lowest setting.
Um, yah, , , No. Any source of ignition spark including running electrics are kept far away from propane storage, Open Flame? Forget about it
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Old 11-21-2016, 09:51 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
I am no expert yet, but there is no difference between liquid and vapor, it's just a phase change like water and ice, same fittings work with both, just depends which space the inlet is in
Of course. What it ends up coming down to is storage and refills. 20lbers with vapour draw fittings are the most common sized tank and are everywhere. They are also easy to lift and get filled.

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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Definitely don't mess around with separate vaporizers or anything like that, and totally unnecessary end complicated and therefore dangerous, stick to tried-and-true standard solution gotta be willing to pay a professional
I'll disagree with this (to a point). Vaporizers do a great service. They are trustworthy and are run in all fork lifts and propane vehicles with few incidents. I would have no problem having one in my living space. They can be connected like any other propane appliance. I'd be far more concerned about a propane refrigerator in the living space.

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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
The forklift styles mounted horizontally giving a much larger surface area, as well as more than double the volume, will alleviate that problem for sure, unless you're talking Alaskan winter or something.
Getting back to the first note: horizontal tanks are incredibly difficult to remove and refill. It's all fine if the tank is permanently mounted and you don't mind uprooting and driving the bus into town, but that doesn't work for me. Also, the average low temperature in January of my area is -14.8C (5.4F). Anchorage, Alaska has an average low temperature in January of -12C (11F). Anchorage has it easy . I notice a significant drop in available propane vapour in the winter.

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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Some people put an electric blanket type heat source around tanks when it gets that cold , pretty expensive if you aren't on Mains power. But a hose with some warm water running through it wrapped a few times around a tank would do the same thing, just don't even think about bringing tanks inside the enclosed space with human beings.
Yep, if you're plugged in that's a reasonable solution. I'll be switching to liquid draw 20lb tanks and connecting an ambient air driven vaporizer inline (next to my propane oven and propane alarm) when I get annoyed with the availability of cold propane vapour. I'll connect it the same way I do all propane appliances: with great attention to detail, proper fittings and pipe and extensive testing.
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Old 11-21-2016, 10:58 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
Um, yah, , , No. Any source of ignition spark including running electrics are kept far away from propane storage, Open Flame? Forget about it
Keep in mind, I would never suggest anyone do something this stupid, however. One year I had a frozen pipe I needed to thaw out in a hurry. It was a small section just a few inches where it had no insulation. I grabbed my portable propane torch and tried to light it, but it would not light, too cold. The propane was liquid and no pressure to push it out, no vapor.
So, my BBQ was sitting there, and as stated, with the larger surface area of the 20lb tank, it did light, poorly, but it did. I took the 1lb can and put it on top of the BBQ and warmed it up. after a few minutes the can was warm and it lit just fine. I thawed the pipes and fixed the insulation problem.
Scary Redneck Crazy? YES, but it did work.
***DON"T TRY THIS AT HOME***
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Old 11-22-2016, 02:05 AM   #15
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Originally Posted by Oldmopars View Post
...So, my BBQ was sitting there, and as stated, with the larger surface area of the 20lb tank, it did light, poorly, but it did. I handed my beer to a friend, took the 1lb can and put it on top of the BBQ and warmed it up. after a few minutes the can was warm and it lit just fine. I thawed the pipes and fixed the insulation problem.
Scary Redneck Crazy? YES, but it did work.
***DON"T TRY THIS AT HOME***
Fixed it for ya.
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Old 11-22-2016, 06:12 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by Oldmopars View Post
Keep in mind, I would never suggest anyone do something this stupid, however. One year I had a frozen pipe I needed to thaw out in a hurry. It was a small section just a few inches where it had no insulation. I grabbed my portable propane torch and tried to light it, but it would not light, too cold. The propane was liquid and no pressure to push it out, no vapor.
So, my BBQ was sitting there, and as stated, with the larger surface area of the 20lb tank, it did light, poorly, but it did. I took the 1lb can and put it on top of the BBQ and warmed it up. after a few minutes the can was warm and it lit just fine. I thawed the pipes and fixed the insulation problem.
Scary Redneck Crazy? YES, but it did work.
***DON"T TRY THIS AT HOME***
I have had to crawl under a mobile home more than once to thaw pipes in -20 C.

I will probably get a propane supply company to work it out for me.

Gordon

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