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Old 04-19-2015, 11:15 AM   #41
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I don't understand the need for flexible panels.

In order to maximize solar exposure, the panels need to be flat, facing the sun.

Or are you guys going to contact cement them to the curved bus roof?

Nat
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Old 04-19-2015, 11:18 AM   #42
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I like the idea of gluing them down and not poking extra holes in the bus roof to attach panels. I also like the idea of not having a wind trap underneath the panels.
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Old 04-19-2015, 11:23 AM   #43
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In the south where the sun is higher in the sky that might work. However up here, the panels need to be set at the optimal angle, and also need to track the sun.

For me the panels will be the single most expensive part of my electrical system. There for they will be mounted on folding mounts, that swivel to track the sun.

Nat
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Old 04-19-2015, 11:26 AM   #44
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My plan is to glue two panels on the roof, leaving a central walkway then to build up more panels and batteries as time progresses.
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Old 05-12-2015, 02:26 PM   #45
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what about a huge panel running down each side of the bus? After a roof raise, you could more than triple the panel area available than by simply covering the roof. They could be hinged and lift like wings when parked for optimal sunshine. With those two, a panel covering the roof and a huge battery storage pack underneath, maybe they'd even generate enough power to drive?
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Old 05-12-2015, 04:45 PM   #46
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panels

from what I have read,
the individual solar collectors on the panels dont bend well,
not having air circulation underneath the panels will increase their heating and decrease their efficiency,
the bendable clear coat on the panels dont last as long and dont protect the panels as well,
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:25 PM   #47
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i was reading about electric vehicle rv and was wondering how much juice it would take to push a bus. then of course, the next question is whether you can capture enough from the sun to keep it going. nevermind the logistics of wind, wear and damage for a minute, would max'ing out the surface space on a bus with panels do it?
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:31 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slideforlife View Post
i was reading about electric vehicle rv and was wondering how much juice it would take to push a bus. then of course, the next question is whether you can capture enough from the sun to keep it going. nevermind the logistics of wind, wear and damage for a minute, would max'ing out the surface space on a bus with panels do it?
Sorry not even close.

It would take 500 times what the entire bus coated in panels could make.

Nat
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:36 PM   #49
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over on teslamotorclub.com they were talking about 170 Kwh of batteries to get 300 to 400 miles of range for a class c rv. I saw an 25' roof covered with panels getting 3.5 Kwh. Get an 40'er and cover the sides as well and maybe that gets up to 15Kwh. Only 155 more to go before it's there!

EDIT: apparently there's reasons that it may be between 170 - 340 Kwh (probably on the high end) to get 200+ miles. But the solar panels wouldn't have to generate that constantly, right? you go as far as you can, then set up camp and wait to recharge. If you got enough time, with 4 Tesla 85 power packs, it's doable. (just dreaming)
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Old 05-12-2015, 08:38 PM   #50
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Here's an electric bus that was put into service at the University of Utah campus last year. The article mentions a 50 kW wireless charging system. I don't know how many hours it has to sit on the charger each day at that rate.. but supposing it was just one hour, then if one were going to charge it with solar instead in a place where there are 5 hours of solar insolation to work with, an array would have to produce 10 kW/hr which is about 42 of the common 235 watt panels. I bet this bus spends a lot more than just one hour per day on that charger, though!
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