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Old 08-06-2015, 06:16 PM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
With an ac system, live and neutral both have power going through them. They're alternately positive and negative.
Unfortunately it's more complex than that:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ground_and_neutral

In a closed circuit there is electricity flowing through neutral. From my limited understanding, in an open circuit with a properly wired system there should be basically no electricity flowing through it (maybe a couple volts through induction). Somewhere along its run it is bonded to ground.

Reverse polarity of an AC system is still a Very Bad Thing™
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Old 08-06-2015, 06:22 PM   #82
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I'm of the opinion that the existing fuse panels aren't what I need I think in light of the revelation (which we should have expected) that wiring at camp sites can be cock-eyed, it makes sense to be prepared. Perhaps double up on fuses - one for each wire. We should also remember that ground might not necessarily be grounded
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Old 08-06-2015, 07:10 PM   #83
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Sorry I didn't realize you were talking about using glass fuses for 120 volt.

I thought you were talking about 12 volt stuff.

No one uses glass fuses for 120 volt either. They won't even come close to passing code.

For 120 volt, a modern breaker panel is the only way to go.

Nat
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Old 08-06-2015, 07:12 PM   #84
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
Perhaps double up on fuses - one for each wire. We should also remember that ground might not necessarily be grounded
That won't protect you against any of the situations discussed in the past couple threads. Breakers can be coupled (2-pole, 3-pole). Fuses cannot. If you were to fuse hot and neutral separately you will find that the chances of both blowing simultaneously will be the exception - not the norm - leaving the other potentially live wires still connected to your outlets. Heck, you might even end up in a situation where the neutral line fuse blows before the hot line fuse due to manufacturing irregularities. It's not something you want to bank on.

I'd seriously advise you to run your ideas by a qualified electrician before going ahead. You risk not only hurting/killing yourself, but others around you. OR go with UL approved devices, boxes, breakers (or fuses if you must, though there is no good reason to do so).
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Old 08-06-2015, 07:30 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by nat_ster View Post
Sorry I didn't realize you were talking about using glass fuses for 120 volt.

I thought you were talking about 12 volt stuff.

No one uses glass fuses for 120 volt either. They won't even come close to passing code.

For 120 volt, a modern breaker panel is the only way to go.

Nat
Odd. We have breakers in Britain but every appliance has its own glass fuse in the plug and the plug goes in a switched socket. No gfi use at all. Electricity save for lighting is banned in bathroom and toilets. The only light switches permitted are pull switches with nylon cords.

And our voltage - 240
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Old 08-06-2015, 07:32 PM   #86
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post

I'd seriously advise you to run your ideas by a qualified electrician before going ahead. You risk not only hurting/killing yourself, but others around you. OR go with UL approved devices, boxes, breakers (or fuses if you must, though there is no good reason to do so).
You will also be potentially harming others at the camp grounds with your scarey wiring.

IMO

I'm all for a individual being a DIY type. However, you have a long long way to go before you should touch a single wire.

Best start reading this thread, and many many more.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f10/ho...ms-ac-448.html

Nat
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:29 AM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
Odd. We have breakers in Britain but every appliance has its own glass fuse in the plug and the plug goes in a switched socket.
Lots of devices in North America still use glass fuses internally. They only blow when something goes seriously wrong, usually meaning the device is damaged. Breakers provide over-current protection for the whole circuit. Without breakers you could plug in 500 self-fused devices and melt the circuit wires without blowing a single fuse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zephod_beeblebrox2 View Post
No gfi use at all.
As I understand it, the equivalent to a GFI in the UK is a Residual Current Device (RCD). They typically live in the electrical panel, unlike a North American GFI which is typically an integrated outlet. RCDs are sometimes integrated into a breaker/RCD combo which is then called an RCBO (Residual-current Circuit Breaker with Overcurrent protection).

I'm just learning this UK stuff from Wikipedia and google, btw.. I'm no universal electrician
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Old 08-07-2015, 09:37 AM   #88
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Me...I plan on hiring an electrical consultant to help layout my system.

The only thing I know for certain about things electrical...
is that you never, ever stick bobby pins into those little holes in the wall.

Learned THAT one the hard way at an early age.
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Old 08-07-2015, 12:37 PM   #89
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We generally boondock and use little power like you do, Zephod. So we went the simple route. We have one heavy duty extension cord going in each direction. The one the runs from the front of the bus connects to the inverter. That cord goes to the back of the bus and plugs into a power strip in the back room. In the middle of the bus the cord is cut and wired into the cord of another power strip. In the front room we have the same thing. We run laptops, chargers, a record player, a light, a deep freezer converted to a fridge, and occasionally will run a small lcd tv and dvd player on this setup. Generally not all at once. The inverter will cut itself off if the load is too high, and it has a marine fuse on the red wire as well.

The cord running from the other direction is set up the same but hooks up to the generator. This is for running a toaster oven, rice cooker, crock pot, vacuum cleaner, or whatever else draws a lot of power and would be used when the generator is running. (Not all at once.) The window AC and washer/dryer combo unit will be plugged up separately to the generator. Make sure not to plug too much in at once so you don't overheat the cord, and it works fine. This extension cord also has 25 feet left over to run out of the bus in plug into any regular 120v outlet. No high Amp stuff to mess with. Even the dryer runs off 115v.
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Old 08-08-2015, 11:22 AM   #90
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So I hate read through this entire thread, and noticed that lithium ion batteries were mentioned. I read an article the other day about the new tesla batteries they are lithium ion. So I was considering using them in my (much distant) future solar system on the schoolie I will eventually buy hopefully at the end of the year. I will be using it recreationaly. For possibly up to a week at a time. Did I understand correctly that lithium ion Batts need regular (daily) discharge for the life of a battery to maintain viability making them a poor choice for my application? I'm a machinist so spacial math is second nature to me making it exceedingly frustrating that I'm having trouble with electrical math lol. I can't figure out how large system I need so I'm just going to make a huge battery bank and solar array to hedge my bet. I understand wiring (mostly) but this capacity, rate of discharge, system efficiency business is tough for me to get strait in my head. I'm going to use rv appliances except the ac witch I think I'm going to try using a mini split duct
Less AC because I'm seeing an 8/10 amp startup surge from what I have read and between that and the washer dryer combo should be the most power intensive components, since I plan on using propane alternatives as much as possible. Sorry to be long winded but I finally found a group I can ask questions to that speak like normal people!
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