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Old 05-24-2016, 02:21 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
YT is full of various stoves you can build yourself. For folks that are already working on buses it would seem the wood stove issue would also be a build specialized for the bus. For some reason stoves made from a steel tube or large pipe expel more heat than a square stove. Of course I don't have any proof of that other than personal experience.

If any of you remember the old, old timers, they often had an awkward looking long stove pipe crossing the ceiling of the room. That was not an accident or poor planning. The stove pipe can put out as much heat as the stove itself with a longer run.

Personally, and I realize my opinion isn't always valued, I would not spend more on a stove than I spent on the purchase of this bus. That stove on that site was reported as "$4545 TOTAL Investment".

Of course what does or does not go in your bus is up to each and every individual here. I only have pride for my stove when it's a cold day and the stove is very, very hot.
the Long stove pipe is how the bedrooms were originally heated in the house my parents currently have.. there were stoves in the rooms below and the stove pipes came up through the floor and ran along the wall with a slope upward to the chimneys at each end of the house...

-Christopher
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Old 05-24-2016, 04:36 PM   #32
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...One more thing to add is minimum clearances. The are simply a waste of space. We are building in a metal structure, not wood. Use rock wool, and set that stove 2 inches from the wall. After all, most the room needed for a stove is the clearances around it from combustible materials. If you use non combustible materials, you don't need to waste that space. This is part of why my kitchen counters, cupboards, and all other interior storage will be made of formed steel, not wood...

Nat
This thinking is fraught with peril. Heat does not stop moving just because it runs into a non-combustible material. Steel has excellent thermal conductivity, and will radiate a tremendous amount of heat.


It is the material behind the barrier that matters - it must either be non-combustible or have adequate clearance to prevent pyrolysis. Pyrolysis is the thermal decomposition of organic materials, and it can take hundreds of heat cycles for such materials to break down to the point where they ignite. In other words, it can take years to find out you were wrong.


Also, remember that radiant heat moves in every direction from the source - including straight down. Floors need protection too!
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Old 05-24-2016, 04:40 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
the Long stove pipe is how the bedrooms were originally heated in the house my parents currently have.. there were stoves in the rooms below and the stove pipes came up through the floor and ran along the wall with a slope upward to the chimneys at each end of the house...

-Christopher
That's interesting to hear. I've never seen or heard of that pipe idea being used that extensively. That fits my theory that at least 80% of the heat goes out as smoke.
The rocket stoves are amazing, and it's not that hard or expensive. The issue shouldn't really be about the size of one's stove. The real concerns are how often you've got to feed it and how easy that fuel is to replenish.
People keep trying to make a pellet feeder that consistently works, without electricity, to feed a small rocket stove. You know, occasional feed tube fires and stuff.
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Old 05-24-2016, 06:05 PM   #34
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I've got these 2 stoves sitting at home waiting to go in, I'm thinking the smaller Pot Belly on the left.
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Old 05-24-2016, 06:28 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by Robin97396 View Post
That's interesting to hear. I've never seen or heard of that pipe idea being used that extensively. That fits my theory that at least 80% of the heat goes out as smoke.
The rocket stoves are amazing, and it's not that hard or expensive. The issue shouldn't really be about the size of one's stove. The real concerns are how often you've got to feed it and how easy that fuel is to replenish.
People keep trying to make a pellet feeder that consistently works, without electricity, to feed a small rocket stove. You know, occasional feed tube fires and stuff.

you can control the amount of heat loss in a wood stove by sltering the dampers.. .. opening the air and closing down the chimney will usuaslly slow the exhaust flow and the wood burn.. closing dpown the air also controls the wood burn but doesnt dso much to contain the heat...

a lot of people put stack heaters on their wood stoves or heat exchangers..

you could conceivably run a high temperature glycol or oil loop by wrapping copper tubing around the inner wall of a double wall exhaust pipe and then fitting the outer wall on the pipe...

of course doing this means you have to handle the excess heat / pressure in the loop just like any other boiler.. an oil filled loop can be run MUCH hotter but doesnt have quite the transfer capabilities of water or glycol.. but you wont blow yourself up either..

the loop flow would then go to a fan coil someplace which could easily use a small battery powered fan.. (doesnt take much).. which could be charged by solar during the day if you are living wiothout electricity.

-Christopher

-Christopher
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Old 05-24-2016, 06:35 PM   #36
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Even though I'm in FL, I'm thinking of looking for a little stove.
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Old 05-24-2016, 08:54 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu & Filo. T View Post
I've got these 2 stoves sitting at home waiting to go in, I'm thinking the smaller Pot Belly on the left.
If you're well insulated I think you should do fine. I view that type stove as more of a coal burning stove. I have several similar stoves, one with a water jacket around the firebox. I've tried those, but there's nothing like a stove that will take normal size firewood. Those will work, but it's not much different than using a wood cook stove. I'm guessing you've also got a furnace?
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Old 05-24-2016, 11:47 PM   #38
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If you're well insulated I think you should do fine. I view that type stove as more of a coal burning stove. I have several similar stoves, one with a water jacket around the firebox. I've tried those, but there's nothing like a stove that will take normal size firewood. Those will work, but it's not much different than using a wood cook stove. I'm guessing you've also got a furnace?
Not yet but yes that is the plan.
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Old 05-25-2016, 01:00 AM   #39
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The stoves are quaint and they like wood split pretty small. They're cool looking, but in actuality they're pretty labor intensive for real life purposes. If you install one of those you will get accustomed to building a fire vertically rather than horizontally. It could easily add heat especially in a well insulated bus. For my back road trips I just found them kind of noisy and ended up opting for something with fewer rattling parts. You can cook on them, but about 50% of the heat you're feeling comes from splitting the wood.
Point is, it works out great if you've got kids.
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Old 05-26-2016, 08:27 AM   #40
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not the tinyest but it what im going with, big enough fire box i dont have to wake up in the middle of the night and i can bake.
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