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Old 10-02-2015, 01:23 PM   #1
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Tiny wood stoves

I just came across these any thoughts?

Cubic Mini Wood Stoves - Mini wood stoves
Mini 12 CT Survival Stove - GrayStove.com

Tiny Wood Stove | Efficent, Affordable - Small Wood Stoves for Tiny Spaces!
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Old 10-02-2015, 01:33 PM   #2
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The Cubic stove was what I was aiming for (provided that after the layout is finished there is still room for a stove plus the surrounding space).

I hear a lot of good reviews about the Hobbit Stove too.

Most important for me is that the stove draw the air for combustion from outside.
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Old 10-02-2015, 01:47 PM   #3
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The Cubic Mini seems too good to be true. Looking at just how TINY it is, I can't believe that anything that small would heat any significant amount of space or put off the BTU numbers they are claiming. Has anybody on here tried one?

We looked into Hobbit stoves a little bit and that's what we're leaning towards, though could certainly be convinced otherwise still...They are being sold in the US by Alaska Masonry Heat in southern Oregon, for right around $1k. You can buy it with an outside air option factory installed.
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Old 10-02-2015, 04:03 PM   #4
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The BTU is always in BTU/HR so realistically yeah it could get those numbers, you are just going to have to be babysitting it a bit. The hobbit stoves look neat but seem a bit big, and spendy. I used to sell wood stoves the whole outside air kit thing works but if you simply have a small pipe running near the inlets the flow will take the path of least resistance and get sucked in through it. It is clear that the cubic mini was designed for boats, and the mini ct 12 if you read his website he was a welding teacher, so that thing was probably originally built for heating a workshop. It is impossible to track down reviews on them.
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Old 10-02-2015, 06:54 PM   #5
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We recently bought the Hobbit SE and it's currently in transit from the lower 48 to Alaska. The skeptical side of me thinks it will be too small to sufficiently heat our space. Once we get it in, I'll be able to give a more in depth review.
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Old 10-02-2015, 07:26 PM   #6
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Small stoves = constant loading.

I have lived with wood heat most of my life. If your serious about using wood heat, buy as big of stove as will fit, and build smaller fires in it if you need to.

A small stove will only take small wood. Small wood burns up quick. You will hate getting up 3 or 4 times in the night to reload the stove.
Also cutting wood into tiny pieces gets old real fast.

A large stove can take large pieces of wood. Large wood burns longer, and takes less time and resources to cut. Large stoves can still have small fires built in them.

I need to start a wood stove thread.

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Old 10-02-2015, 10:03 PM   #7
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We were running into some clearance/space issues with our build that ruled out anything larger than what we ended up going with.

That being said, I've seen some normal (big) wood stoves going into builds. I got ran out of the skoolie with our kerosene heater on LOW this spring... It became uncomfortably hot in short order.

We run a hearthstone heritage in our poorly insulated 1,000 square foot home here and it does pretty well but then the soapstone stoves are kind of a different topic...
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Old 10-02-2015, 10:19 PM   #8
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I agree with Nat, a bigger stove will let you put in enough fuel to last through a cold night and you can build a small fire for a cold morning that will turn into a warm day without opening all of the windows to let out all of the excess heat. If you have space considerations go with the small stove and feed it during a cold night. It will work fine as long as you don't mind waking up to feed the fire.
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Old 10-03-2015, 02:32 AM   #9
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Large stove = lost space
Yeah I know it is constant loading, but as a life long pyro I LOVE playing with fires so not a down side to me. Also the goal is to be nomadic and if it is too cold it is time to move (sorry to all the Canadians with nowhere to go but Vancouver). The fire going out at night is crappy I will fully concede that point. I feel this can be mitigated with some nice down comforters, and not staying where it is too cold. Also if you have a fire too small for your stove you might not be achieving an efficient burn. I will also have either a electric or propane heater too. Also As far as soap stone you can always go get a slab and lay it on top of your stove. If I find that I love living in a cold ass place and my tiny stove isn't cutting it I will get out my tools and turn it into an auto feeding pellet stove.
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Old 10-03-2015, 03:12 AM   #10
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I still think this is a pretty attractive option, given the price and features which include a blower and that its already set up for a external air intake and its mobile-home approved by UL
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