Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 09-11-2019, 06:43 PM   #1
Mini-Skoolie
 
TheRollingBones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 34
Boondocking coach?

Has anyone ever seen a 10x10 Lifted Coach built for off road/boondocking? I don't mean a rock climber or mud-buggy- that would be stupid. Just a RV motor coach equipped to go down BLM and national forest dirt roads. I look forward to your reply.

Papa Bone.
TheRollingBones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2019, 06:51 PM   #2
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 4,935
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
There are 4x4 buses out there.

There is one down the road from me that is lifted and has aggressive tires on it. I have been bugging the school district for a year waiting for them to retire it.

Or: https://expeditionportal.com/forum/t...ol-bus.191677/
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2019, 07:05 PM   #3
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 287
Year: 1999
Coachwork: American Cargo 14'L x 7'8"W x 7'H Box
Chassis: Ford E350 Cutaway
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 11500 lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRollingBones View Post
Has anyone ever seen a 10x10 Lifted Coach built for off road/boondocking? I don't mean a rock climber or mud-buggy- that would be stupid. Just a RV motor coach equipped to go down BLM and national forest dirt roads. I look forward to your reply.

Papa Bone.
What does the "10x10" refer to? Rows of seats? Or do you mean the 5 axle Daf monster bus from Iceland?
alpine44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-11-2019, 09:23 PM   #4
Mini-Skoolie
 
TheRollingBones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 34
10 x 10 Coach explained-"on a typical American RV motor coach"

there are 10 wheels on the typical american motor coach. Some tag axles only have two wheels. If all 6 or 10 wheels are powered-you would have a 10x10 0r a 6x6. If I am wrong, I apologize.

Respectfully
Papa "Rollin" Bone
TheRollingBones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 08:57 AM   #5
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Asheville, NC
Posts: 287
Year: 1999
Coachwork: American Cargo 14'L x 7'8"W x 7'H Box
Chassis: Ford E350 Cutaway
Engine: 7.3L Powerstroke
Rated Cap: 11500 lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRollingBones View Post
there are 10 wheels on the typical american motor coach. Some tag axles only have two wheels. If all 6 or 10 wheels are powered-you would have a 10x10 0r a 6x6. If I am wrong, I apologize.

Respectfully
Papa "Rollin" Bone
Thanks for the explanation. Makes perfect sense now.

Member "JDOnTheGo" on this forum fulltimes in a big, newer MCI coach and does a lot of boondocking.

From what I understand, he got stuck once when the ground was too soft and the rear wheels sunk in on one side until the axle bottomed out. More driven wheels are not going to help there.

Let me explain the real problem with heavy vehicles. I have a 4x4 Unimog that could theoretically drive on one wheel with lockers in the center and on both axles. Add to this massive tires, portal axles, and therefore huge ground clearance. If that is not enough it also has a front loader and a backhoe that can be used to shift weight or push/pull you out of a precarious spot.

You would not think about ever getting stuck with this thing, right?
20180116_154705.jpg

Wrong! When the ground gets too soft to support the vehicle weight (16,000#), even this purpose built off-road machine sinks until it bottoms out and then it's 'game over' as shown in the next picture.
20190313_145350.jpg

The solution to my blunder of driving in the wrong spot (a recently filled ditch) was a long chain and the green tractor in the background.

Also visible in the background is a white box truck that I am currently converting into an off-road RV. I decided for the Ford E series chassis because it can easily be converted to 4x4 like mentioned in the first reply to your original post.

At this point, I am torn whether I even do the 4x4 conversion. I think a modest lift, taller, wider tires and a locker in the rear will do the job (plus a winch bumper just in case). I came to this conclusion after taking the truck as is with DRW and the original, puny tires on many Forest Service roads in the Smoky Mountains. There were one or two places where the vehicle would simply not fit due to size but 4x4 is not going to fix that. Clearance and turning radius will be even more the limiting factors for a coach.

The other big challenge with a coach is to find off-road tires that are rated for the weight and the speed of a coach. There are military tires that have the weight rating and will get the job done in the dirt but they will slow you to a crawl on the highway, howl like wolves, and wear out quickly on pavement.

I think the best solution for boondocking with a coach is a toad that you scout the area with and only drive the coach to places that you have confirmed to be safe. That's how JD goes about it now.
alpine44 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 09:33 AM   #6
Bus Nut
 
Drew Bru's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Minnehaha Co., SD
Posts: 630
Year: 1996
Coachwork: Amtran
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466
Rated Cap: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpine44 View Post
I think the best solution for boondocking with a coach is a toad that you scout the area with and only drive the coach to places that you have confirmed to be safe. That's how JD goes about it now.
Having a towed vehicle makes it MUCH easier to scout out boondocking spots. If the road looks even a little sketchy, we usually find a place to park the bus and scout with the truck. Having to back the bus out of a forest road is no picnic.
__________________
Our Build: https://dazzlingbluebus.wordpress.com/
Drew Bru is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 04:35 PM   #7
Site Team
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 990
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
In terms of coach/class A RV, I've never seen anything more than a single drive axle. A drive shaft coming from rear to front would spoil all the basement space that a coach offers.

Not sure where you are/plan to go but many BLM/Forest Service roads are reasonably good. Washouts, trees, sand, and very tight corners are the most significant problems I've had (in the west). If you have a tag, you have to be a little careful as you can end up with the drive tires barely making contact with the ground.

My getting stuck adventure was mostly stupidity - but I learned a thing or two. It was on a sandy beach. Semi-moist & firm when I arrived, fairly dry when I attempted to leave several weeks later. Also had one drive tire that had went flat and that may have helped (the getting stuck part).
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 04:45 PM   #8
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 4,935
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew Bru View Post
Having a towed vehicle makes it MUCH easier to scout out boondocking spots. If the road looks even a little sketchy, we usually find a place to park the bus and scout with the truck. Having to back the bus out of a forest road is no picnic.
Much trooth here.....

Unfortunately I did not have the good fortune of learning from someone else's experience.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 05:48 PM   #9
Skoolie
 
PatrickBaptist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2019
Location: Johnson City TN
Posts: 147
Year: 2004
Coachwork: IC/AMTRANS RE
Engine: 7.3 T444E
Rated Cap: 36000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDOnTheGo View Post
In terms of coach/class A RV, I've never seen anything more than a single drive axle. A drive shaft coming from rear to front would spoil all the basement space that a coach offers.

Not sure where you are/plan to go but many BLM/Forest Service roads are reasonably good. Washouts, trees, sand, and very tight corners are the most significant problems I've had (in the west). If you have a tag, you have to be a little careful as you can end up with the drive tires barely making contact with the ground.

My getting stuck adventure was mostly stupidity - but I learned a thing or two. It was on a sandy beach. Semi-moist & firm when I arrived, fairly dry when I attempted to leave several weeks later. Also had one drive tire that had went flat and that may have helped (the getting stuck part).
IF it is really a "tag axle" then all you have is an extra set of wheels to help with more weight, there isn't a tag that is a drive axle period.
Letting air out of your tires when stuck will actually help you gain more traction. Done it several times in 2wheel drives to gain more traction, especially in snow.
__________________
If you would like to check out my website that has all sort of information especially for the T444E/7.3PSD engines check out www.PatrickTheSalvageGuy.com I've got helpful downloads and articles as well as a link to my YT for other how to videos mainly on the F series trucks.
PatrickBaptist is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-12-2019, 05:54 PM   #10
Site Team
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 990
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by PatrickBaptist View Post
IF it is really a "tag axle" then all you have is an extra set of wheels to help with more weight, there isn't a tag that is a drive axle period.
Exactly right. You can then imagine the problem with a very uneven surface where the tag is solidly on the ground and the drive axle is not. Normal people do not take coaches into such conditions.
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:35 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.