Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-21-2018, 09:55 AM   #701
Bus Geek
 
Tango's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Houston, Texas
Posts: 8,442
Year: 1946
Coachwork: Chevrolet/Wayne
Chassis: 1- 1/2 ton
Engine: Cummins 4BT
Rated Cap: 15
One idea I am considering is similar to the above.


Mount it on the rear below roof height but on a pivoting lift so that when docked it can be raised fairly easily.
Tango is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2018, 02:03 PM   #702
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 3,993
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
I used a "crank up" satellite dish on my 1st bus. It was less than 8" tall in the stowed position.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2018, 05:20 AM   #703
Bus Nut
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 916
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by abwetzel63 View Post
...would it have been possible to mount it on a platform sticking out of the back of the bus, where the antenna only sticks up a tad, or would that block the signal too much?
I suspect that would block the signal. They say that a clear line of site is necessary. The further north you get, the lower on the horizon this is (for the Dish satellites, at least). I suspect any form of alternative is possible but if really a concern, a manually deployed antenna is probably the answer. I did that for a few years with my first RV and it worked fine for my style of use (stay in one place for a week or two). It was a bit of a nuisance to figure out and get good at but a person can get pretty quick at it with some practice.
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2018, 10:21 AM   #704
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 3,993
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
I put one of the "crank up " dishes on my first bus.

It generally took 2-3 minutes to deploy. Stowed, it was only 6-8" tall.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2018, 02:56 PM   #705
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Greater Boston
Posts: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
One idea I am considering is similar to the above.


Mount it on the rear below roof height but on a pivoting lift so that when docked it can be raised fairly easily.

I mean, it's not like you've got an awesome ladder hanging around on the back of your bus that makes it easy to access stuff on the roof. . . .
Mark_In_MA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2018, 03:27 PM   #706
Bus Crazy
 
CaptSquid's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Billings, MT
Posts: 1,218
Year: 2003
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: HDX
Engine: Cat C7
Rated Cap: 84 passenger
When I drove for a living, I had my Satellite Dish (Dish Network) mounted on a pole that raised it above the roof of my 13'8" tractor. I would find the ZIP code for the location and would input that into the set box. It would tell me the elevation and the azimuth for the dish. I would raise the dish to the correct elevation and then put the pole up and rotate it.
CaptSquid is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2018, 07:11 AM   #707
Bus Geek
 
Brewerbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Essex, MD
Posts: 3,399
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Blue Bird
Chassis: Blue Bird TC RE 3904, Flat Nose, 40', 277" wh base
Engine: 8.3L Cummins ISC 260hp, MT643, 4.44 rear
Rated Cap: 84 pax or 1 RV; 33,000lbs
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptSquid View Post
I would find the ZIP code for the location and would input that into the set box. It would tell me the elevation and the azimuth for the dish. I would raise the dish to the correct elevation and then put the pole up and rotate it.
Undoubtedly there's an app for that today.
Brewerbob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2019, 09:02 AM   #708
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Germany
Posts: 7
Really interesting what you have done with this project so far! Have been reading all you blog posts yesterday and am wondering how the project is going?

Also: I could not find it anywhere and thought if you would share a bit of financial stuff, what the coach originally cost and what you spent to this point?
Really difficult to find information about these kind of conversions online, at least in comparison to skoolies.
caspar. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2019, 10:31 AM   #709
Bus Nut
 
JDOnTheGo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: The West
Posts: 916
Year: 1998
Coachwork: MCI
Chassis: 102 EL3
Engine: DD 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by caspar. View Post
Really interesting what you have done with this project so far! Have been reading all you blog posts yesterday and am wondering how the project is going?

Also: I could not find it anywhere and thought if you would share a bit of financial stuff, what the coach originally cost and what you spent to this point?.
Thanks Caspar,

The project is "stalled" but in a good way, sorta. I continue to live in Missy and am quite comfortable - she is working just fine. However; I've gotten so busy on other things that I have done very little work on her. By most people's standards, her interior remains a long ways from complete in terms of nice ceiling, walls, etc. I hate to admit it but I barely notice most of that anymore - unless I am giving a tour - then I am painfully aware of the lack of 'finish'.

I'm not too keen on sharing financial stuff. Most of the discussions here are about keeping these things inexpensive - I am all for that and certainly don't want to discourage anyone. All situations are unique so mine is as well. It is generally hard for any of us to understand the decisions made by someone else because (IMO) we tend to view them in the context of what we know/our own lives. So, if I tell you I spent $3.98 for a new gizmo, some folks think it was a smart purchase, others think it was a dumb purchase but all form an opinion. I'd rather folks see 'possibilities' and then figure out how to fit the possibilities that are attractive to them into their build/lives. For example; if I tell someone that I have a $400 million super yacht (I don't) and that you should get into boating too because the being rocked to sleep at night is wonderful - they will likely laugh and not give it a second though - not even remotely possible. If I tell you I have a boat and love being rocked to sleep, that might sound appealing to some and they might look into doing something similar - in whatever way is possible for them - which may be some floating 55 gallon drums and a sheet of plywood. That person can enjoy the experience just as much as the guy on the yacht.

I will say that I am employed full-time. Because of that, I am obligated (IMO) to have a reasonable working environment which includes power, Internet, 'comfort', and availability. The latter meaning that being broke down and sitting in some remote shop/unable to really focus on work for days at a time is not really an option. That's the agreement that I think 'working remotely' implies. If I were retired or unemployed, I would certainly NOT have a project such as Missy.

Having lived in medium size gas motorhome and then a couple years in a pretty nice diesel pusher motorhome, I knew what the 'life' was like - and I enjoyed it. The reason for a coach conversion is that there was nothing with which to fill my time - I was bored. I had made all the improvements that were 'possible'. Of course, things change (as Dwight Yoakum says) and that is no longer the case!! (busy again…)

With all that in mind, I will tell you that a coach project is several orders of magnitude more expensive than a typical bus conversion. Do some browsing at the cost of a used coach and you'll see what I mean. I've probably poured more into 'service' than the typical bus conversion budget. Given my diesel pusher motorhome experience, I knew that going in. I also knew what I "needed" to live the way I wanted to live (in terms of water capacity, power requirements, storage, etc.), how to drive it, where I could/could not go with it. I realize that not everyone has that experience - I'd suggest that a cheap motorhome for the first year might be the best investment any potential 'converter' could make.

Wow… a dissertation… sorry…
__________________
JD - Full timer out west
Missy - 1998 MCI 102-EL3 - 1.7kW Solar - 10kWh Lithium
My Adventures & Build
JDOnTheGo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2019, 10:49 AM   #710
New Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: Germany
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by JDOnTheGo View Post
Wow… a dissertation… sorry…
No need to be sorry! I can understand your choice not to share financial stuff, it's always difficult to not have somebody feel attacked at the end.

Anyways - thanks for the detailed answer and the wise words. Got some stuff to think about now (as always)
caspar. is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
conversion, lithium, mci, solar

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:10 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.