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Old 07-22-2014, 06:32 AM   #11
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Location: Roswell, NM
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Year: 1986
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Forgot to mention, make sure your appliances will fit thru the entry door. Unlike skoolies, a Provost or any other highway coach, does not have the lovely wide emergency exit doors. We use ours to get our full sized residential appliances in (and out). If you own a highway coach either your appliances will fit thru the entry door or you haul the coach into a shop, the front windshield is pulled so the applinace can be removed & replaced using a hoist and then the windshield is re-installed. It's a pricey thing but you can afford it. After all you own a coach.
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Old 07-22-2014, 06:56 AM   #12
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Location: North Georgia Mountains
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Year: 96
Coachwork: AmTran
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Thanks for the link and the information lornaschinske. As I indicated earlier, I expect to have both the coach and the skoolie before this is over with. And for the advice on getting things in and out of the Prevost. Unfortunately I don't have the kinds of funds available to have much of the work done by shops. Fortunately, I do have the skills, and machinery to do most of that in my home shop. I was thinking of popping out a side window to move things in and out, but removing one of the front windshields would allow even more room. I have a hoist and a small forklift (I live on a farm, we have lots of equipment that can be repurposed temporarily) in my shop, so that should help. The only things I will be farming out are replacing the tires and possibly a paint job, but I'm trying to get my buddy that does paint work to come up to my place to do the paint, as his shop isn't big enough to pull the bus into. I really don't want an open air paint job, Georgia has too many things floating around in the air to contaminate the paint.
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Old 07-22-2014, 12:49 PM   #13
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Outcast
Cool, I'm in Cleveland.

If I could pick your brain just a bit more, what is required in Georgia to have it retitled as an RV? I'm getting conflicting information from what are supposed to be "official" sources and with your experience in the matter maybe you can clear some things up. To begin with I'm looking to just do enough to get it retitled, a bare minimum. Later, over the winter, I'll gut her and start a complete rebuild, but I need her retitled so I can get a tag and insurance and drive her to the various places I need to be to get some of the work done. As it already has a toilet built in, that is one out of the way, but what else will I need, and how intense are the inspections, if any?
well I went to country tags place here in Ellijay,and told them I had converted a blue bird school bus to a motor home and I want to the retitled as motorhome,so when the title came back.it was bluebird motorhome,i just put the bear mim insureace on it. and my cost for a tag a yr is $125.00 per yr and insureence was $25.00 a yr
also I painted mine in the back yard,and build a paint both of 2x4 and bisqeen (plastic trap )
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Old 07-22-2014, 02:15 PM   #14
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Great! What insurance are you going through? I use progressive, but everybody keeps telling me that they have issues with covering converted buses.

Thanks again for the words.
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Old 07-22-2014, 03:16 PM   #15
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Quote:
Originally Posted by Outcast
Great! What insurance are you going through? I use progressive, but everybody keeps telling me that they have issues with covering converted buses.

Thanks again for the words.
I use the same thing,now for four yrs now ,,,,,,,, when u in the hood stop by...
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Old 08-08-2014, 06:56 PM   #16
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Re: Prevost Le Mirage

Went to tag office in Gainesville, Ga to find out what we needed to do, girl didn't know was gonna have Super research and get back with us. Two weeks went by, no call, so we went back. Same girl, remembered us and went off to the back to chat with Super (I guess). Long story short....left there with new tags for our now titled MOTORHOME. Go figure!!!!!

Called Keith's agent about insurance....Progressive no longer playing with bus conversions and didn't have a clue who we could call. Started checking around here and got some name & number (don't remember who...not important). Somehow got to this very, very pregnant girl who was jumping thru hoops while walking on her hands who got us insured through NATIONAL GENERAL INSURANCE (800-325-108, under a GOOD SAM VEHICLE INSURANCE PLAN if we joined Good Sam Club, which we did.

Good luck.....each story seems to be different which each bus.
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Old 10-01-2016, 02:17 PM   #17
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: PDX, Oregon
Posts: 2
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Prevost (Canada)
Chassis: Prevost Le Mirage
Engine: 8V92 Silver 12.1L 2-Stroke Turbo
Rated Cap: 43 Passenger 40'x12'x8'
You can convert a Prevo for "looks" if you want to have a nice shiny bus. Many RV parks will still not let you in. The Prevo Conversions have other advantages like my 8V92 Silver Turbo with 1250 ft-lb.s torque, 550 HP, and freeway gearing that is unstoppable. The hydraulics will allow for higher clearance but you will not want to offroad with an 8 foot wide, 12 foot tall three-axle hydraulic lift bus. Also, all of the panels are made from stainless steel so rust is not a factor.

The negatives include higher maintenance from the hydraulics, refrigerant, finding 40W CFII oil ***do not use Delco 15W40 on a two stroke***, and tuning. Mine gets about 12MPG and can go much faster than is legal (70MPH up steep Mountain Passes).
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Old 10-01-2016, 08:40 PM   #18
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I spent alot of time in the pilot seat of a Converted 2004 Prevo.. what a joy that bus was to drive... and it had Power... I never took it up the rockies.. but it ran from ohio to florida plenty of times... im not sure what was in it... I like to think this one was a 450 HP cat though.... it wasnt mine, it was brand new , and its owners had it serviced professionaly a few times a year.. even they wouldnt drive it...

-Christopher
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Old 11-28-2016, 04:28 AM   #19
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Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Florence Oregon
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Year: 2000
Coachwork: Amtran
Chassis: RE 35'
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 72 passenger
I was a charter bus driver in the late 70s and early eighties. I have driven a lot of miles in these coaches. Every thing from PD4104s PD 4106s eagles, Prevost, you name it. I drove in the mountains of Colorado, ski charters,etc. I was an owner operator independent trucker for many years also. I chose a skoolie because they can go places you can't go in a coach. I have driven 4104s and 4106s for a resort driving up steep gravel roads to ski areas. The old 2 cycles burned up because the axel ratio was so high, we had to lug the engines to keep the speed down, resulting in low oil pressure causing engine failure. Dust and dirt got into the air filters and that killed the engines also. A front engined skoolie would be better for gravel roads because the air intake is in the front of the cloud of dust behind the bus. A rear engined skoolie,,, I have one and I'm going to be very careful with dust on dirt roads, but skoolies seem to be better designed for rough roads. Lower gearing, higher clearance. Tighter turning radius etc. It is also much cheaper to replace a skoolie engine. They are smaller, lighter, and you can just buy another school bus for the engine and parts if needed. That keeps the cost low. I needed to have $10 thousand to $20 thousand in the bank just incase I had to rebuild the 425 air to air Cat engine in my Kenworth. I was running a 15 speed with over drive and a deep reduction gear to deliver pipe to oil wells. One of the rear ends still failed once anyway. Larger coaches have tag axles and that means more tires to replace, more brakes, etc. Someday if my ship comes in, I'll buy an old Eagle for the highway. But my skoolie will run circles around it in camp grounds, and city streets. The old Blue Bird FE Wander Lodges from the late 70s and early eighties had a lot of things right other than the throw away cat engines in my view. Tough as nails. Low enough to clear low hanging tree branches over rural highways and drive ways, and low clearance bridges and phone lines also.
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Old 11-28-2016, 02:25 PM   #20
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Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: PDX, Oregon
Posts: 2
Year: 1986
Coachwork: Prevost (Canada)
Chassis: Prevost Le Mirage
Engine: 8V92 Silver 12.1L 2-Stroke Turbo
Rated Cap: 43 Passenger 40'x12'x8'
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveningham View Post
I was a charter bus driver in the late 70s and early eighties. I have driven a lot of miles in these coaches. Every thing from PD4104s PD 4106s eagles, Prevost, you name it. I drove in the mountains of Colorado, ski charters,etc. I was an owner operator independent trucker for many years also. I chose a skoolie because they can go places you can't go in a coach. I have driven 4104s and 4106s for a resort driving up steep gravel roads to ski areas. The old 2 cycles burned up because the axel ratio was so high, we had to lug the engines to keep the speed down, resulting in low oil pressure causing engine failure. Dust and dirt got into the air filters and that killed the engines also. A front engined skoolie would be better for gravel roads because the air intake is in the front of the cloud of dust behind the bus. A rear engined skoolie,,, I have one and I'm going to be very careful with dust on dirt roads, but skoolies seem to be better designed for rough roads. Lower gearing, higher clearance. Tighter turning radius etc. It is also much cheaper to replace a skoolie engine. They are smaller, lighter, and you can just buy another school bus for the engine and parts if needed. That keeps the cost low. I needed to have $10 thousand to $20 thousand in the bank just incase I had to rebuild the 425 air to air Cat engine in my Kenworth. I was running a 15 speed with over drive and a deep reduction gear to deliver pipe to oil wells. One of the rear ends still failed once anyway. Larger coaches have tag axles and that means more tires to replace, more brakes, etc. Someday if my ship comes in, I'll buy an old Eagle for the highway. But my skoolie will run circles around it in camp grounds, and city streets. The old Blue Bird FE Wander Lodges from the late 70s and early eighties had a lot of things right other than the throw away cat engines in my view. Tough as nails. Low enough to clear low hanging tree branches over rural highways and drive ways, and low clearance bridges and phone lines also.
Those are good points to bring up. However I was not going to pass up a $6,000 Prevo with 100K miles and being able to shave my head in my alloy mirrored wheels. Schoolies definetely have their advantages. Maybe after getting more settled and buying land a schoolie or wanderlust is in my near future as well. Great busses!
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