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Old 08-12-2018, 07:49 PM   #1
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2007 Chevy Express G3500 Rusty Glow Plug Issue

My vehicle is a shuttle bus - 2007 Chevy Express G3500, 6.6L V8 Turbo Diesel. Milage is around 90,000.

I need some advice about how to proceed with a problematic glow plug issue. The problem is that in Colorado in order to register a vehicle it can't have a check engine light on or else it is an automatic fail for emissions (which is required before I can register and get plates). I thought to replace glow plugs was a straightforward and simple mechanical fix, however, I've taken it to 3 repair shops now (one dealership and two independent shops). All have told me that they refuse to do the work because they notice some surface rust around the glow plugs. They told me that they cannot fix the plugs because they are afraid that they will break off due to the rust and thus require an engine rebuild.

I'm in a bind right now. Can't get it registered or plates on the vehicle. It has NY plates for now which are valid. However, I am wondering if I should sell the vehicle or try to fix the glow plugs??

First, has anyone had a similar experience or issue in their vehicle?

Is there a way to apply some anti-rust agent to the surface of the plug and allow it to soak overnight. Would that do the trick? Is there any good way to remove a glow plug that is rusty to ensure it will not break off into the engine?

Is there a good shop/mechanic in Colorado to take it to?

Thanks,
Aaron
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:00 PM   #2
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Disable "check engine" light.
Did you check the code to determine it was an injector issue? Prep and Etch or Ospho sprayed on the area will delete any rust.
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:16 PM   #3
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I didn't see the code directly. Just what was reported from the auto shop. They said it was a bad glow plug on cylinder #5.
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Old 08-12-2018, 08:32 PM   #4
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This is pretty common on rusty duramax engines. There it's a tool to drill them out if they break. I have done this a lot on plow trucks.
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Old 08-12-2018, 10:00 PM   #5
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So besides looking rusty, are the glowplugs themselves rusted in too bad to turn out?

Soak them a bit with penetrating oil and if it comes to it heat them some to get them moving.
Easier than having to drill out a broken one and replace that way.
Tight spots to get at?


John
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Old 08-13-2018, 03:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trailer2 View Post
This is pretty common on rusty duramax engines. There it's a tool to drill them out if they break. I have done this a lot on plow trucks.
Thanks, Trailer2. What's the tool the is used to drill out a broken glow plug? And what would the est. cost be if that had to be done at a shop? Hopefully, it doesn't come to that, but it's good to know just in case.

Also, do you know if I can simply replace the one bad glow plug or do I have to replace all the glow plugs at once. I've replaced spark plugs in gas engines and usually, it's recommended to do them all at once, since if one is out then the others are not usually far behind. Is that the case with diesel vehicles in your experience.
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Old 08-13-2018, 03:35 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackJohn View Post
So besides looking rusty, are the glowplugs themselves rusted in too bad to turn out?

Soak them a bit with penetrating oil and if it comes to it heat them some to get them moving.
Easier than having to drill out a broken one and replace that way.
Tight spots to get at?


John
That's a good idea John. I think I'll try to soak them and spray the anti-rust chemical listed above before trying to turn them. I haven't search for the plugs yet and I don't know how hard they will be to get at. I'll try to locate them and then upload pics.
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