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Old 08-26-2015, 06:16 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by bansil View Post
our mnts are shorter....but they are older and the climb to 3900' is a long way when in 1st gear at 2200 rpms

3900 feet? That's a pimple, not a mountain.
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Old 08-27-2015, 10:17 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
Very easy to do. Especially when Jacobs company makes both engine and exhaust brakes . A key thing to remember is that engine/compression brakes are only on larger engines, But an exhaust brake can be used on just about any diesel engine (the Navistar 7.3 is one that can't, Jacobs has a write up on it if you want to read more).
Perhaps I'm misreading this. Are you trying to say that the 7.3l can't have Jake brakes installed? That's probably true.
It can, however, have an exhaust brake installed. They actually come from the factory with an Exhaust Backpressure Valve (EBPV) just after the turbo. This is intended to warm the engine up faster in cold weather, but some folks have taken manual control over it so it can be used as an exhaust brake. It's not highly recommended, but it works.
Otherwise there are aftermarket exhaust brake kits.
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Old 08-28-2015, 11:09 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Perhaps I'm misreading this. Are you trying to say that the 7.3l can't have Jake brakes installed? That's probably true.
It can, however, have an exhaust brake installed. They actually come from the factory with an Exhaust Backpressure Valve (EBPV) just after the turbo. This is intended to warm the engine up faster in cold weather, but some folks have taken manual control over it so it can be used as an exhaust brake. It's not highly recommended, but it works.
Otherwise there are aftermarket exhaust brake kits.
Compression brakes? For sure not, too small of an engine to be worthwhile.

Exhaust brakes? Read here
Jacobs Vehicle Systems | FAQs

Like you said, the EBPV is used to warm a cold engine up from the factory. From the factory, it was never intended to be an exhaust brake. According to Jacobs and Ford/International, it's recommended not to have an exhaust brake on that engine, and they specifically state the consequences. IMO I'd trust their testing/judgment over any forum warrior or aftermarket company. If they would have felt comfortable doing it, I think they would have, because it's a helluva nice feature to have. But they didn't, so......
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Old 08-28-2015, 11:22 AM   #24
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I wish I had a jake every time I see one of these in my area-
Always by some gated "community" where the houses cost a half million dollars and are one foot apart.
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Old 08-28-2015, 12:29 PM   #25
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See those in lots of small towns that have Interstates running through them too.
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Old 08-29-2015, 08:20 AM   #26
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You see them everywhere, most say no jakes period. You can thank the "6" year old truck drivers who run them with no muffler and think it's "cool" to use them all the time, even in the flatlands. I've seen more "no jake" signs in Ohio than anywhere else. Also see them a lot in new housing areas at the bottom of some mountains.

Might not have had a truck in the feed store in downtown Pagosa Springs had he used his Jake.

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Old 08-29-2015, 09:39 AM   #27
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Lololool

R.i.p. chickens






CC, 3900 ft in 5 or 6 miles is rough when road is curvey as a some of the wwII nose art





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Old 12-30-2015, 08:42 AM   #28
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Originally Posted by bansil View Post
Lololool

R.i.p. chickens


CC, 3900 ft in 5 or 6 miles is rough when road is curvey as a some of the wwII nose art

3900 feet can be a lot depending on where you start. Those chickens only traveled 3700 feet from the point that Earl woke them up until they were inside the feed store (except the top row of course who somehow wound up a casualty of the snow shed on the east side of the pass which would have put the feed store in South Fork but I digress).
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