Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-11-2015, 10:35 AM   #1
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 6
Smile Brake lines sizes

Hi all

New member, still not sure if I will jump on a skoolie or a coach conversion. I am going to look at a 1993 B600 shortie at a remote location but can't drive it due to split brake line. I would like to know what size the line and connector (ie 3/8" line SAE or metric?) are so I can bring a brake line repair kit (ie from master cyl to chassis line feeds)

This would save me having to drive 2 hrs round trip to take parts off bus, go to parts store, and return again.

thanks in advance

Ken
kjurkic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 11:01 AM   #2
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Winlcok, WA
Posts: 1,607
I hate to say this but there are so many different variables over the years and over the different models it is hard to say exactly what might be the size of the brake line on that particular bus.

Most were 3/8" and most were SAE. I doubt any were Metric.

But giving an opinion on what the correct length and size might be would be a WAG.

It must be in a really remote area if it is more than an hour away from a parts store.
cowlitzcoach is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 11:09 AM   #3
Site Team
 
bansil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: MNT CITY TN
Posts: 5,045
could also have lucas girling brakes and may be a split airhose?
__________________
Our build La Tortuga
Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.
George S. Patton
bansil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 11:55 AM   #4
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 6
B600 brakes

Hi

thanks for quick reply; I do know they are hydraulic brakes, not air.

Its located in a small town 80km down an active logging road. Small village at end (yes even Canada has villages with no services- I have been in even more remote locations)

I was just hoping to take along enough parts to fix it for a test drive.

I might gamble on taking a Ford/ SAE thread collection of bits & bobs. Don't want to spend too much on pieces without being sure I am buying this bus.

It has the Cummins/allison combo, all mechanical FI, so I know that can be fixed with pliers and a screw-driver.

cheers
Ken
kjurkic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 12:15 PM   #5
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjurkic View Post
Hi

thanks for quick reply; I do know they are hydraulic brakes, not air.

Its located in a small town 80km down an active logging road. Small village at end (yes even Canada has villages with no services- I have been in even more remote locations)

I was just hoping to take along enough parts to fix it for a test drive.

I might gamble on taking a Ford/ SAE thread collection of bits & bobs. Don't want to spend too much on pieces without being sure I am buying this bus.

It has the Cummins/allison combo, all mechanical FI, so I know that can be fixed with pliers and a screw-driver.

cheers
Ken
Oh boy. You're not buying a tree planting bus, are you? those things get heavily abused by the many inexperienced drivers who tromp them over the de-activated logging roads.

Where are you located, by the way?
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 01:33 PM   #6
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Oh boy. You're not buying a tree planting bus, are you? those things get heavily abused by the many inexperienced drivers who tromp them over the de-activated logging roads.

Where are you located, by the way?

Hi

I am in central Vancouver Island. Bus has about 250k-km on it, formerly was in a University fleet. I know the organization that has it, and I travel to that location regularly, just trying to save a couple of days and the hassle of pulling the defective lines, bringing into town and returning.

I talked to auto-parts guy and he noted Fords of that generation often had different sized connectors on the master Cylinder vs the chassis connection so the of-the-shelf brake line replacements might not work anyhow.

I posted here because there there are no B600 enthusiast forums, and the local big truck parts place had no info on B600's

cheers
Ken
kjurkic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 02:34 PM   #7
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario
Posts: 1,439
Year: 1997
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: B3800 Short bus
Engine: T444E
Rated Cap: 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjurkic View Post
thanks for quick reply; I do know they are hydraulic brakes, not air.
Don't write off the fact that they might be Lucas-Girling brakes then.. They are disliked by everyone who has had to repair them. I drove around a B600 of about the same vintage as the one you're looking at and it had Lucas-Girling. One indicator of having them would be the parking brake: is the parking brake actuated with a flip-switch and are there "canisters" at the rear brake drums? If so, it probably has L-G brakes. If the parking brake is engaged by a long lever it probably has normal hydraulic brakes with a cable-actuated parking brake. If it has all-around disc brakes it will be a more conventional hydraulic system.

It seems L-G brakes are prone to leaking fluid. You will want to inspect them closely. From reading forums and the like, brake parts are becoming scarce and expensive.

Here's some reading on the subject: Ford B-700 Hyd E- Brake Question - School Bus Fleet Magazine Forums

This post has some diagrams: http://www.ford-trucks.com/forums/95...-please-2.html
This picture shows the parking brake switch I mentioned above (TW-11).


Quote:
Originally Posted by kjurkic View Post
I am in central Vancouver Island. Bus has about 250k-km on it, formerly was in a University fleet. I know the organization that has it, and I travel to that location regularly, just trying to save a couple of days and the hassle of pulling the defective lines, bringing into town and returning.
That's good. I'd imagine a university would have a proper bus driver behind the wheel for insurance reasons.
__________________
My build page: Armageddon - The Smell of Airborne Rust
jazty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 04:38 PM   #8
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 6
WOW excellent pic

thanks for all that - much better prepared

cheers
Ken
kjurkic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 09:49 PM   #9
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Stony Plain Alberta Canada
Posts: 2,939
Year: 1992
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
IMO

The Lucas-Girling brake system is superior to other hydraulic in one major way.

Just like air brakes, it has spring pots on the rear brakes. If you lose hydraulic pressure, your brakes are activated, bringing your bus to a safe stop.

All other hydraulic brake systems, if you lose your pressure, you lose your brakes going down the mountain.


Now

My haul all bus was a B700 with that brake system. It uses hydraulic hoses as brake lines for the rear parking brake pots, and regular steel brake lines for the fronts and the regular driving rear brakes. It will also have a mess of hydraulic hoses used up by the master master cylinder hanging off the firewall.

Tens of thousands of these systems are still used on the road today.

One draw back can be cost.

Your looking at $1000 to overhaul the brakes on a B700.

Same size bus (TC2000) with disk brakes on all four costs around $250.

Nat
__________________
"Don't argue with stupid people. They will just drag you down to their level, and beat you up with experience."

Patently waiting for the apocalypses to level the playing field in this physiological game of life commonly known as Civilization
nat_ster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-11-2015, 09:59 PM   #10
New Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 6
Again, thanks for all the info - I was not very successful googling B600 & brakes

If a person just had to replace the lines, whats a good estimate of costs?

K
kjurkic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.