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Old 03-18-2019, 06:47 PM   #1
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Emergency Brake Won't Disengage

My bus has been in storage all winter and it's been a bit of work to get her started again. Well today I tried to move her to a different storage spot and could not. The emergency break seems to be stuck and the lever to disengage it does not work.
She is a '96 Bluebird TC 2000 Cummins 12 v and auto alison transmission. I really had to floor it to just move her a little bit, if it were not for the light being on I would have thought she was stuck in the mud. The emergency break is to the left and is a foot pedal and a hand pull release, I hear something when I pull the release but I don't think it's releasing the emergency break. Also, the regular break makes a buzzing sort of sound if I do not tap it up with my boot after pressing on the break. (not sure if the two are connected)
I'm not mechanically savvy but need to get this figured out on my own and both fast and frugally.
Where is the emergency brake cable and where is it attached to?
How do I know if it is rusted in place?
Can I PB blast it and scrub the rust away or does in need replacing ASAP?
Would AAA be able to do anything to help in this situation as I need to move my bus but if I can't get the break off I can't drive her.
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:38 PM   #2
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assuming it is a drum parking brake, follow the cable back to the drum and tap it with a hammer. could just have some buildup from winter.....
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:56 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Rovobay View Post
assuming it is a drum parking brake, follow the cable back to the drum and tap it with a hammer. could just have some buildup from winter.....
Thanks for the help, I'm not sure how to tell if it is a drum parking brake or not? Can you elaborate? If possible break it down for me like your explaining to a kid as I'm not the brightest or most mechanically knowledgeable. Thanks!
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Old 03-18-2019, 08:06 PM   #4
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It sounds as though it is drum brakes. they work by pumping fluid into a wheel cylinder that expands the brake "shoes" against the drum to cause friction to slow down. The E brake is mechanically controlled by a steel cable that connects the E brake handle and the actuating arm in the drum that manually moves the shoes against the drum to keep it from moving. Some disc brakes have a separate mechanical E brake separate from the caliper. Start at the handle, identify the cable and follow it back, usually to a splitter and then to each rear drum. Lots of connections that can get gummed up. Clean and lube everything so it moves freely.
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Old 03-18-2019, 08:52 PM   #5
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for example, on my truck, the parking brake runs down the outside of my driverside frame down to the rear. it is held in place with some eye bolts. should be easy enough to identify. get some eyes on it. post pics if you are still stuck.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:07 PM   #6
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Your bus should have a brake drum on the output Yoke of the transmission which is the parking brake. Make sure to check your wheels before you crawl under there and watch for movement of the actuator arm while someone applies and releases it with the engine off
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Old 03-19-2019, 12:44 AM   #7
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Your bus should have a brake drum on the output Yoke of the transmission which is the parking brake. Make sure to check your wheels before you crawl under there and watch for movement of the actuator arm while someone applies and releases it with the engine off

I believe Kubla meant to say "chalk" your wheels ... so that the vehicle does not roll.
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Old 03-19-2019, 04:08 AM   #8
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I believe Kubla meant to say "chalk" your wheels ... so that the vehicle does not roll.
Close- its "chock".
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Old 03-19-2019, 07:00 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
It sounds as though it is drum brakes. they work by pumping fluid into a wheel cylinder that expands the brake "shoes" against the drum to cause friction to slow down. The E brake is mechanically controlled by a steel cable that connects the E brake handle and the actuating arm in the drum that manually moves the shoes against the drum to keep it from moving. Some disc brakes have a separate mechanical E brake separate from the caliper. Start at the handle, identify the cable and follow it back, usually to a splitter and then to each rear drum. Lots of connections that can get gummed up. Clean and lube everything so it moves freely.
Okay, I comprehend better when I restate things in my own words instead of just sayin I see.
So I will move the handle around while someone crawls under the bus to see what is wiggling. This wil lbe the cable, I will find a splitter with four more cables leading to each of the rear drums. These splitters could be gummed up so I need to clean them. What do I clean them with? I'm guessing not dish soap so a suggestion to pick up at Walmart would be appreciated. Thank you!
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Old 03-19-2019, 07:02 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Rovobay View Post
for example, on my truck, the parking brake runs down the outside of my driverside frame down to the rear. it is held in place with some eye bolts. should be easy enough to identify. get some eyes on it. post pics if you are still stuck.
I feel foolish for driving the hour to my bus and not coming back with any pictures of the problem to post. I will be out there again tomorrow to troubleshoot and photoshoot.
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