Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 05-27-2019, 01:36 PM   #21
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,325
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post
I was replying to firebuild in post #5, where she asked how to use them and what the levels are supposed to be. Nobody answered that question in a way that I thought was sufficient.

My test strip reply wasn't for you, it just happened to follow your post. In no way was I insinuating that you didn't know how to use test strips.
Sorry about that. Your post appeared right below mine, I thought you were talking to me.......
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 01:39 PM   #22
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,325
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
REmember to ONLY use distilled water in your cooling system. Tap water is bad, its got minerals and stuff.
Absolutely!!

Our city water runs around 250 ppm TDS. No way you would want that in any cooling system.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 01:45 PM   #23
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 18,791
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
Absolutely!!

Our city water runs around 250 ppm TDS. No way you would want that in any cooling system.
I cringe when I see tap water going in except emergencies.
My friend stopped by the other day and his car was overheating. We smoked a joint and when the car had cooled down I opened up the rad cap. Straight rusty water. He's been running just tap water with no coolant "since it leaks a bit". Damn it.
He's still driving it like that after I'd tried to explain it all to him.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 01:50 PM   #24
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 550
Year: 1990
Coachwork: Thomas 4 window w/lift
Chassis: G30
Engine: 350 Chevy
Rated Cap: 10K
Wonder what the manufacturers use in their 50/50 mixes???
I've never ran into problems using tap H20 instead of distilled, to mix up a homebrew of 50/50 antifreeze from concentrate.
What harm can it possibly do?

Sorry for "hijacking" your thread, Mary!
peteg59 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 01:54 PM   #25
Bus Nut
 
Mountain Gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 382
Year: 1999
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC1000 HandyBus
Engine: 5.9L 24V-L6 Cummins ISB
Rated Cap: 26 foot
Quote:
Originally Posted by firebuild View Post
What's in there now looks green but it has a lot of rust in it. I'm thinking I need a radiator.

2002 7.3L would be Powerstroke, wouldn't it? Mine is IDI.
Flush that rust out ASAP! It can wear on your waterpump bearings. Take the radiator out of the vehicle at that time, flush it internally with clean tap water from the top down, flip it upside down, and flush it till it is clear. If it hesitates to flow in any way, get a new radiator. Also if it leaks, of course, but then don't bother flushing it. Drain ALL the tap water out before filling the whole system (following the specs) with distilled water / antifreeze mix at 50%/50%. If you can, do that with all the heaters in the bus, if you kept them. If you just have the dash heater, remove the heater hoses from the motor and flush one side with tap, allowing it to drain from the other hose until clear. Then flush with 2 gallons of distilled water, or push out the tap water with compressed air (warning - potential mess maker!). You can flush your motor block with the lower radiator hose removed by flushing tap water through the heater-hose connection at the motor-head, again waiting for clear(er) water coming out of the lower radiator hose connection; follow that with a gallon of distilled water. If you think some water remains in the motor or heater core behind the dash, just add a bit more coolant when refilling. If it ups to a 60%/40% mixture, the extra coolant won't hurt.
Mountain Gnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 01:54 PM   #26
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 1,210
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
Tap water is a generic term. Each municipality has different standards for water quality.

We use tap water in the shop, because the town filters and softens our water pretty well. Some places don't and you should avoid it.

Water can have minerals like lime, calcium, and iron in it. These minerals will fall out of suspension in a cooling system and plug stuff up. They might also react negatively with modern coolants.
Booyah45828 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 02:00 PM   #27
Bus Nut
 
Mountain Gnome's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 382
Year: 1999
Coachwork: BlueBird
Chassis: TC1000 HandyBus
Engine: 5.9L 24V-L6 Cummins ISB
Rated Cap: 26 foot
And when refilling your system after draining and flushing, make certain you follow the proper procedures for removing air from the system.

Get the detailed procedure from a repair manual.


try reinstalling one heater hose, and filling the other one by holding it up high, through the heater core back to the motor head, doing so with the radiator installed and the cap removed.
Mountain Gnome is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 02:13 PM   #28
Bus Geek
 
o1marc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2017
Location: Dawsonville, Ga.
Posts: 7,911
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Genesis
Chassis: International
Engine: DT466/3060
Rated Cap: 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by peteg59 View Post
Wonder what the manufacturers use in their 50/50 mixes???
I've never ran into problems using tap H20 instead of distilled, to mix up a homebrew of 50/50 antifreeze from concentrate.
What harm can it possibly do?

Sorry for "hijacking" your thread, Mary!
Little if any. Antifreeze and coolant do more than those 2 jobs. It has lubricants in it that keep the block from rusting.
o1marc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2019, 02:25 PM   #29
Bus Geek
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Eastern WA
Posts: 5,325
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: All American RE (A3RE)
Engine: Cummins ISC (8.3)
Rated Cap: 72
For those of us that have wet sleeve engines there is on more function.

Preventing cavitation in order to keep our liners from pitting.
PNW_Steve is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2019, 06:17 PM   #30
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
How do you read SCA levels with a specific gravity tester?

I'll stick with the strips.......
Thanks for the response! Picked some up today!
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2019, 06:19 PM   #31
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
For those of us that have wet sleeve engines there is on more function.

Preventing cavitation in order to keep our liners from pitting.
Do I have a wet sleeve engine? (Spoken like the true newbie I am)
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2019, 06:28 PM   #32
Bus Crazy
 
HazMatt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: E Central Tejas
Posts: 1,997
Year: 1998
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: IH 3800, 8 window
Engine: T444E w/ Spicer 5-speed MT
Rated Cap: I prefer broad-brims hats
If Max has a runny nose, and poor hygiene habits...
Probably.
__________________
Those who say that it cannot be done should not interrupt the people doing it.
HazMatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2019, 06:29 PM   #33
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
OK, let me ask you guys, and this might be another dumb question, though the dumber thing would probably be not to ask.

I'm having a new issue that would seem unrelated to coolant, but I know in some situations coolant can affect transmission function. I don't know if that's true for this engine or not.

For about the past week, Max (the bus's new name LOL) has been over revving, usually before shifting into third, but occasionally at other times as well. Not constantly, but enough that it's caused some concern. Normally, I would immediately start thinking transmission, and of course that could be it, but my rebuilt transmission is only about 6,000 miles old. It's under warranty, but of course it was done in Iowa so who knows if I can collect on that? Anyway, I'm wondering if anything else could cause this, and since the only other thing I KNOW is wrong is this coolant issue, could there be any relationship?

I know very little about things like cavitation though I'm familiar with the concept. What I'm not clear on is the consequence, that is, what you'd feel in terms of performance that might tip you off about it.

I have always been very sensitive to the sound and "feel" of my vehicles in the past but I'm finding this so much harder with this noisy diesel lawnmower-sounding engine.
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-28-2019, 06:45 PM   #34
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 18,791
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by firebuild View Post
Do I have a wet sleeve engine? (Spoken like the true newbie I am)
no, you don't. But don't run tap water!
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2019, 10:45 AM   #35
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: West Ohio
Posts: 1,210
Year: 1984
Coachwork: Bluebird
Chassis: International 1753
Engine: 6.9 International
Rated Cap: 65
Even though you don't have a wet sleeve engine, cavitation issues can still happen and are common in the idi engines due to neglect. Flushing the coolant and maintaining it are pretty important.

Consequences of cavitation is pitting and erosion of the cylinder walls. Eventually they get so thin that they crack and you start dumping coolant into the oil, or combustion gasses into the coolant. This means the engine is trashed and your onto either a rebuild or replacement.

I'm not sure what transmission you have, so I can't give you any more diagnostic pointers aside from making sure the fluid is clean and full, and the kickdown/modulator cable is adjusted right.

Most legit places will have some sort of nationwide warranty though, all your reman transmissions should, and most shops are involved in a network of other places to take care of you.
Booyah45828 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2019, 08:11 PM   #36
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Booyah45828 View Post

Most legit places will have some sort of nationwide warranty though, all your reman transmissions should, and most shops are involved in a network of other places to take care of you.
That's good to know. Still hoping, though, that the problem is less severe than that.
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2019, 08:13 PM   #37
Bus Geek
 
EastCoastCB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2014
Location: Eustis FLORIDA
Posts: 18,791
Year: 1999
Coachwork: Thomas
Chassis: Freighliner FS65
Engine: Cat 3126
Rated Cap: 15
Can you make a video of what its doing?

Your description sorta sounds like its slipping.
__________________
.
Roll Your Own Build Thread
EastCoastCB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-29-2019, 08:16 PM   #38
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by EastCoastCB View Post
Can you make a video of what its doing?

Your description sorta sounds like its slipping.
Yeah, I'll try to do that tomorrow. I actually have video already but I was shooting for the YouTube series so I'm talking over the sound.
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-01-2019, 08:54 PM   #39
Mini-Skoolie
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: South MS
Posts: 12
Transmission acting strange... coolant AWOL... make sure the coolant isn’t mixing with the trans fluid via the cooler in the radiator.
2po2watch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-02-2019, 03:28 PM   #40
Bus Nut
 
firebuild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Location: Waltham MA
Posts: 479
Year: 1991
Coachwork: Lewis
Chassis: Ford E350
Engine: 7.3L Diesel
Rated Cap: 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2po2watch View Post
Transmission acting strange... coolant AWOL... make sure the coolant isn’t mixing with the trans fluid via the cooler in the radiator.
OK here's what's going on right now. Please please please excuse my ignorance, which is plentiful. I haven't really been driving because I'm pretty nervous about this transmission thing; drove it a little bit last night to capture the sound that's going on, but came right home. Of course my laptop is simultaneously dying because my life is like that, and I can't edit the video to post it for you guys. Still working on that.

This morning, with the engine cool after not using it all night, I checked the coolant and it seemed quite low. So I filled it - but I accidentally overfilled it. I have never been able to see any markings to say where the "max" level is, and it kinda got away from me because of the angle I'm pouring it in at (I'm 5 feet tall and using a funnel so it's not super easy to see). The bus has not gone anywhere, it's sitting in the driveway with the engine off. It's been about 3 hours. I just went out there to see if I can see anything leaking.

There is a tiny leak spot with coolant below it, not directly under the radiator but near it on the passenger side, plus a little bit of coolant on the ground that's obviously from me pouring it in.

The radiator is not hot - the engine hasn't been started. But when I opened the radiator cap, it seemed to be under pressure and coolant came out in a small volcano. Just coolant, nothing mixed with it. I would see it if transmission fluid were getting in there, right?

So here comes the super dumb question: why would the coolant behave as if it's under pressure in the radiator if it isn't running? The level in the overflow bottle has gone down only a tiny bit, but the level in the radiator seems to have come way up. There is only an extremely minor leak, yet I seem to be losing coolant fairly rapidly. No sign of overheating, but then there's this transmission thing.

Any thoughts?

Oh, and how bad is it to drive it with the coolant overfilled? I wanted to take it to get the transmission fluid checked. I'm not comfortable doing that myself because in the past I overfilled it, and that was bad news.
firebuild is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×