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Old 12-02-2009, 10:24 AM   #1
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

It could be any of the ford engines that used the large standard ford style bellhousing bolt pattern, you need to find some numbers to id the engine, usually stamped into the front of the block near or on the the top of the cylinder deck. the industrial/truck engines used 2 t-stats to allow more coolant to flow thru the engine to maximize cooling, if you look at a stock t-stat they are pretty restrictive even when fully open. the vacuum advance distributor was also part of the governor assembly, the advance weights could be adjusted and the vacuum lines ran back to the carb and controlled the override on the throttle linkage, (one of the several different choke assemblies), if you look at the base of the distributer their should be a plug below the advance plate, if you remove it and look inside their should be a 7/16 nut that can be turned in or out to adjust the governed speed, in is max speed.

It is a relatively common practice to just replace a failed engine with either a new or factory reman. unit to get the vehicle back into service, (in the early 80's it payed 5.5 hrs to remove and install a gas v8 in a f6oo), the other thing is that if the engine did fail, their might not have been enough useable parts to repair it, I've seen more than 1 engine failure where the blocks were broken bad enough to see daylight thru.

Ford and their thin wall casting techniques have caused a lot of interesting problems over the years, they finally cured the manifold problems and then started to lighten up the cylinder heads to the point that the exhaust manifold would break the end of the cylinder heads, they fixed that problem by installing the diesels.
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Old 12-04-2009, 11:11 PM   #2
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

A 460 will work in a B-700 (I have one, replaced a dead 370)--a 460 and a 429 are both Limas...the only difference is the stroke. A 370 is also a Lima, small bore, same stroke as a 429.

You probably have a Jasper or similar rebuilt long-block. You lucky %$^&*&\!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 12-05-2009, 12:28 PM   #3
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

Chevy was able to go from 262 cubic inches to 400 (and the aftermarket is able to take it out to 434) by just varying bore and stroke in the small blocks. They made 10 different displacement motors with only minor changes outside the bore and stroke. The LSx series motors are all essentially the same too and they range from about 293 cubes up to 427. The different combinations possible within an engine of fun to play with.
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Old 12-05-2009, 01:23 PM   #4
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

Aside from aftermarket blocks, I have not heard of differences in deck heights on small block Chevy engines. I know the small block Fords did this. There were other differences, of course though. Main bearing journal size, block plug placement, the rear seals, siamesed cylinders on the 400, etc, but the blocks are the same for the most part. Chevy just arrived at the different motors by swapping cranks into different bore blocks (307=327 crank in 283 block, 302=283 crank in 350 block, etc). Now obviously it's not just that simply, but it's also not a whole lot more complex either.

Of course your thread is about Fords so none of this is really all that pertinent except as a fun topic for bench racing.

To try and be a little more on track, the dual thermostats is common to the industrial big block Chevy motors. I don't see why it wouldn't be on the Fords as well.
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Old 12-05-2009, 05:19 PM   #5
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

big block chevys had different deck heights, the standard passenger and hiperformance block and the tall deck industrial/truck block 366&427's,
stock small blocks all used the same connecting rod length except the 400's, things really start to get interesting when you start swapping parts, I've heard it said more than once "built ford tuff with chevy stuff"
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Old 12-07-2009, 04:55 PM   #6
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

Quote:
Originally Posted by CHEESE_WAGON
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jarlaxle
A 460 will work in a B-700 (I have one, replaced a dead 370)--a 460 and a 429 are both Limas...the only difference is the stroke. A 370 is also a Lima, small bore, same stroke as a 429.

You probably have a Jasper or similar rebuilt long-block. You lucky %$^&*&\!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
So, let me get this straight. The 370 and 429 share the same bore, and the 429 and 460 share the same stroke? That's pretty impressive, 90 cubes from boring and stroking with the same block. I thought these were called 385-series because they had a common 3.85-inch stroke? Or is the Lima not a 385?
The FE engines: 332, 352, 359, 360, 361, 389, 390, 391, 406, 410, 427, 428, all the same externals. IIRC, a 410/428 crank in a 427 block is about 457ci. Heck, look at the BB Chevy: 366 (MDT and marine only), 396, 402, 427, 454, 502--and that's before getting into stroker cranks!

The 429 came first (1969, IIRC), was stroked to 460 in the 70's...the small-bore 370 was a MDT-only engine. You have it backwards: a 370 and a 429 share the same stroke, a 429 and a 460 have the same bore. A 370 is a small-bore block, a 460 is a long-stroke crank.
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:26 PM   #7
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Re: Need A Ford Guru.......

if the valley pan wasn't necessary the accountants woud have made the engineers leave it out. it's in there to control oil flow either away from the bottom of the intake manifold or to keep the oil from draining down thru the rotating mass of the crank and rods and getting aireated.
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