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Old 06-01-2016, 11:54 AM   #11
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Here are a few more tidbits I've picked up lately:

Common leak points

Turbocharger pedestal EBPV (Exhaust Back Pressure Valve) actuator - This will leak into the engine valley and ultimately drip down the back of the engine and appear to be a rear main seal leak. You can either rebuild the actuator or remove it and seal off the hole in the pedestal.

Fuel filter bowl - The new ULSD diesel attacks the O-rings in the fuel bowl and often a leak will appear at the water drain valve at the back of the bowl. The fuel bowl is easy to rebuild but is hard to get at in a van body.

HPOP gasket - The HPOP (High Pressure Oil Pump) provides high pressure engine oil to fire the injectors. The most common HPOP leak is the gasket at the base of the pump where it bolts to the top of the engine. This is another one that's not too easy to get at in a van body.

High pressure oil rail plugs - Each head has a plug at the rear of the head that seals the oil galleries that the HPOP feeds. There's an O-ring on the plug that sometimes goes bad. This is an easy job on a van body.

Up pipe seals - There are two exhaust pipes that run from the back of the exhaust manifolds up to the turbocharger. Look for soot around the connections and/or a smell of exhaust in the passenger compartment. With time the doughnut seals become loose and leak which can cause a loss of power and fuel mileage and increased exhaust temperatures. There are replacement kits from many vendors that use a "bellows" arrangement that does away with the doughnut seals and gives a much more long lasting fix. This is another easy job in a van body.

Most 7.3L fuel and oil leaks happen at the top of the engine and leak down the passenger side of the engine to the transmission bell housing mimicking a rear main seal leak. Actually, the main seals on this engine are very reliable and main seal leaks are fairly rare.
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Old 06-01-2016, 12:47 PM   #12
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Location: Vermont
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Year: 1996
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Engine: Ford 7.3 Powerstroke
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A lot of what you've posted isn't included in this website, but it's a great resource for any Powerstroke owner. Tons of info on every model from a shop that's dedicated specifically to these engines.
POWERSTROKEHELP.COM - The Information Source for Ford Power Stroke Diesel Owners & Mechanics

I'd like to reiterate your recommendation that an Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) gauge is a necessity for anyone who's thinking their Powerstroke should last 500,000 miles.

Another common failure on the 7.3 is the transmission. Both the E4OD, and the later 4r100 transmissions have well-documented weaknesses. Common upgrades include the transmission cooler, and a temperature gauge (easy). Your tranny oil change procedure takes care of the often-ignored oil in the torque converter, which is vital. One thing I don't think you mentioned was cleaning off the magnet on the inside of the oil pan. It's normal to have debris built up on the magnet, and you want it to continue to pick that stuff up, so cleaning it is important. In fact, I'd drop the pan and clean it inside and out (the E4OD doesn't have a drain plug, so you have to drop the pan every time you change the fluid anyway).

As you've said, parts for these engines are readily available. In VT, there are all kinds of guys parting out their rusted rigs, and I've seen full, healthy engine/transmission combos for $2000. If you're looking for parts, it may be worth it to search craigslist in areas that use salt on the roads, because the running gear lasts way longer than the truck bodies.
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Old 06-27-2016, 02:58 PM   #13
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Rated Cap: 19
More oil leak points

Turbocharger seals -
Leaky turbocharger seals can show up as oil in the turbocharger housing, oil in the down pipe (the exhaust pipe running from the turbo outlet down to the exhaust system below the bus), or (eventually) oil at the tailpipe. Turbo rebuild kits are easily available and the rebuild process is fairly simple.

Injector o-rings - Each fuel injector has three o-rings that separate diesel fuel from the high pressure engine oil that fires the injector. A leaky lower ring often shows up as oil residue in the fuel filter canister (fuel bowl) and often, but not always, white smoke at the tailpipe. A leaky upper o-ring shows up as oil coming out of the top of the injector and flowing back into the oil pan (no apparent oil use). Replacing injector o-rings in a Ford E-van is either very expensive or a major PITA depending on whether you pay someone to do it or decide to do it yourself. The new low-sulphur diesel fuel attacks the stock o-rings so most 7.3's get these replaced at some point in their lives. The new updated o-rings are fairly inexpensive.
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Old 07-01-2016, 10:17 PM   #14
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Great thread! I haven't owned a 7.3 in awhile, but this recommendation holds true for the 6.0 liter as well: always use OEM oil and fuel filters. If held next to an aftermarket version, there are obvious differences. You will have issues directly related at some point.
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Old 07-02-2016, 01:11 PM   #15
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Good thread
I don't have to worry about this type of engine.
My response is about the TORQUE rating's on some of the bolt's
10-15 ft. Pds is what you get when you use a standard open end/box end wrench or ratchet of the same length.
Anything longer or an air ratchet will likely cause problems.?
I learned this from working on diesel fired pumps that had inch pounds instead of foot pounds?
I broke a few pieces and the manufacturer wouldn't cover them cause I used to big of a wrench.
8" wrench-10-12 ft pounds 10" wrench 12-16 ft. Pounds
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Old 07-02-2016, 01:35 PM   #16
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Some reusable gaskets require less torque because of the grommets used that once crushed messes up the gasket.
If you have a leak with a brand new gasket then most likely the housing is warped.
Sealant will only buy you time?
That has been my experience?
Don't necessarily mean others have not had better success?
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Old 08-09-2016, 11:25 PM   #17
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Some 7.3L's don't like a full oil pan

Some, not all, 7.3's like to run about a quart low on the oil dipstick. After replacing my up pipes mine has become one of them. Previously I'd keep the oil level right at the top of the dipstick but after the up pipe repair my oil level dropped to one quart low (half way down on the dipstick) and stayed there. No idea why some engines do this and others don't, but the Ford mechanics I talked to confirmed that it happens.
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Old 08-12-2016, 06:19 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jester View Post
i have the entire t444e engine manual in pdf form, it is huge and in tons of pieces but if any one needs specific or all of it i will email it to you. just message your email to me.
How would I go about obtaining one of these manuals?
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Old 08-12-2016, 06:58 PM   #19
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Has any one switched their vehicle from the green coolant to the hd elc coolant, such as Fleetrite ELC?
And has any one switched from the 192 or 195 degree thermostat to the 203 degree thermostat?
There is tons of info on the web regarding this topic when it comes to 7.3's installed in the f-series trucks, but I cannot find much about the engines in the e-series vehicles. I have spent countless hours reading and researching on the internet. I have read that there are some differences in the engines in the trucks vs the e-series.
My radiator has cracked across the top, so I have to replace it. I'm trying to determine whether or not I should switch to the hd elc coolant and the higher temp thermostat at the same time.
Also, does anyone know where to find the engine's build date on the e-series? I have called Ford and they could only give me the vehicle build date, which I already knew. They said they are unable to find info about the build date of the engine, itself. If I knew the build date of the engine, whether or not to change to the hd elc coolant would be an easier decision. I'm not sure what caused the radiator to crack, but it seems that there must be something else going on for that to happen and perhaps the hd elc coolant might be a good investment. On the other hand, I don't want to switch to the elc coolant and then find out down the road that switching has caused some other type of damage.
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Old 08-12-2016, 11:26 PM   #20
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Whatever kind of fluid you buy, you'll need a lot of it.
I have regular napa antifreeze in mine-and a reg temp thermostat. And it never gets hot. It kinda runs on the cool side actually. If it ain't broken...
The internals are the same from the van to the truck engine. The difference on the outside are minor. 1 valve cover-one exhaust manifold-different turbo-some difference in the oil cooler. (I did a motor swap in mine-and the donor came out of a truck. ) And most importiant difference-the truck has an intercooler-the van doesn't.
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