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Old 07-27-2009, 08:38 PM   #11
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Re: 366 gmc milage questions?

http://www.bgsoflex.com/megasquirt.html
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Old 07-28-2009, 10:25 PM   #12
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Re: 366 gmc milage questions?

Thank you Mr. Eexperience thats what I'm talk'n about, engine managment system , the 21st century. Russell
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Old 07-28-2009, 11:18 PM   #13
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Re: 366 gmc milage questions?

Just be ready for some head scratching frustration and a true sense of accomplishment eventually.
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Old 06-28-2010, 09:45 PM   #14
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Re: 366 gmc milage questions?

High compression gasoline , turbocharger gasoline, schoolbus--not good bed fellows.

Mostly it's about duty cycle. A pickup might take 50hp to push it down the road at a given speed and a bus might take 100hp. On hills or an any acceleration you are going to see 100%--sometimes for several minutes. A pickup might need only 40% on the same hill. Going across Wyoming in a bus into that wind, you might be at 80%+ for hours or 100%. It is designed to take it. The compression was lowered, the displacement is reduced (A 460 down to a 470 or a 454 down to a 366), the heads have reduced port and valve sizes to increase low rpm airspeed and improve low rpm cylinder filling. Due to the duty cycle, the exhaust valves are usually sodium filled to help take heat away from the head. The sodium turns to liquid when it gets warm and circulates heat up the stem. The cooling passages in the heads are generally larger, the water pump, radiator hoses and radiators are larger. Usually the distributor shaft is thicker because it drives a larger oil pump. There may be a mechanical governer built itto the distributor as well. The blocks usually have added webbing and the cranks are steel. I don't know if the 366 has all of these, but I've had a 361FT and a 413 truck engine and they were both like this.

It might be tempting to try and squeeze more out of the gas engines in these, but I wouldn't. If you increase the compression ratio, you may induce detonation that you won't notice in a bus. In a car or truck you drive around using 20% so if it has detonation, you are rarely at full power so it doesn't matter. And on a newer engine there is probably a knock sensor to retard the ignition. The best thing you can do with a bus motor is maintain it.

I think 6mpg is what those get. In a high load application they get 1/2 what a diesel gets. The difference is less in a low load application.
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Old 06-29-2010, 12:09 AM   #15
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Re: 366 gmc milage questions?

The 366 has a few differences. It does have a steel crank and good rods in it, but they're not balanced well. It also is a tall deck allowing for an additional ring on the pistons which also have a thicker head and are obviously longer from crown to skirt. I don't know of any real specific differences with the distributor other than the length of the shaft.. The pushrods are longer to make up the height difference, but I don't know them to be larger diameter or thinner, both of which would make them stiffer so pushrod flex could be an issue with any real head work. The water pumps are different so don't expect a parts store to stock them. A regular Chevy water pump could probably be made to work, but there is a reason they're different. The cooling system is enormous and the TD Chevy motors make use of two thermostats. Most parts stores will stock one... There is room to grow on these engines, just the same as the diesels so long as you keep things reasonable.
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