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Old 05-02-2017, 02:47 PM   #1
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Join Date: Jan 2016
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Dimmer switch wires are really really hot!?

So far so good.the only problem I am having currently is that the wires connected to my toe operated headlight dimmer switch are getting really hot. the wires arnt quite at meltdown stage, but close. I assume I got the bus this was and only just noticed it.have been looking for loose connections with no luck yet. Only thing I can think of is that somehow the aftermarket led lights on the bus draw more current then the original and that it's too much draw for the system.im not even sure those two systems are related though. Any ideas? Bad ground? Bad design?
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Old 05-02-2017, 05:17 PM   #2
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So I take it that the dimmer switch is still working to some degree. Have you unscrewed it form the floor and had a look at it? The switch itself is likely corroded badly due to age and condensation in the bus. The mounting holes are probably rusted out too and you'll need to relocate it.
Which wires are melting down, the feed or the ones going to the lights?
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:01 PM   #3
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All of them seem hot. Pulled the switch up. No rust but there is corrosion all over it from touching the floor for so long. Gona just replace it.cheap fix if it works. Thanks��
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:24 PM   #4
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That doesn't sound right with all the wires being actually warm. I hope it's the switch. If not you're seriously putting my led light plan in jepardey.
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Old 05-02-2017, 07:46 PM   #5
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Yea, if the wires are really hot, something is wrong. Corrosion will definitely increase the resistance which will up the temperature past the point the wiring was built to withstand. Glad you caught it!
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Old 05-02-2017, 10:07 PM   #6
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If you power your headlights through relays you will only have the relays' trigger current through the switches, and the headlights will get full voltage from the alternator and be noticeably brighter. I did this for my high-beams and foglights - well worth it. One incidental benefit to having the high-beams on relays is that you can easily make a high-beam flasher - I put a simple push-switch on the end of my turn indicator stalk.

It sounds like you still need to check why the wiring is getting hot. What gauge is it? A lot of vehicles come with laughably-thin wires for their lights: if so, change them before they burn your bus to a crisp.

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