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Old 10-01-2016, 05:45 PM   #11
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I've got one of those, not as bad as yours yet.
All the cool kids have em. Rejoice!
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Old 10-01-2016, 06:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmania View Post
First, I searched and found an old thread that didn't quite help my particular problem...

I'm needing to replace an axle seal... Google & YouTube make it look pretty straightforward.
I just want to make sure I'm not missing anything.

1) bust the 8 nuts loose, (catch the oil)
2) slide out axle hub & shaft (mark orientation)
3) remove old seal
4) install new seal
5) slide axle hub & shaft back in*
6) reinstall the 8 nuts
7) add new axle oil to fill hole on differential
8 ) wash hands, stand back and say "I did it"
9) take the oil to reclamation center.


There's no pulling wheels & tires?
No jacking up axle & tires?
No opening differential?
*No spline keyway?
(1) Yes.
(2) Yes. I don't think orientation even matters on most axles.
(3) Yes, on both mating surfaces.
(4) Yes. Some axles are hard to find seals for, using a silicone sealant will work too.
(5) Yes. No keyed splines on most axles.
(6) Yes.
(7) Yes, if any is needed. Probably won't be much, if so.
( These steps are optional.
(9) If you have any. If clean, it could even be put back in the axle (Personally, I probably wouldn't bother).

You won't need to remove wheels or tires. No need to jack it up. No need to open up the differential (except to top off as needed when done).
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Old 10-02-2016, 01:35 PM   #13
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I did the rear axle seals on my bus this summer. Here's my post discussing the progress: http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/ar...tml#post153599

Note that my wheels are Dayton style. The process may be different for other styles..

The procedure went like this:
  1. Jack up entire axle. Just enough to get the wheels a hair off the ground.
  2. Drain the diff! I didn't do this and made a mess at the axle ends.
  3. Undo the 8 hub bolts.
  4. Slide the axle shaft out. There is no circlip holding the axle shaft in at the diff. There is no correct up, down, left, right about the axle shaft. It is splined uniformly.
  5. Remove the two jam nuts from the axle end. I was able to tap mine out with a hammer and chisel, but you'll need the proper socket eventually to torque them back up. Mine required the purchase of a 3.25" socket ($30).
  6. Remove the outer roller bearing and put it in a safe, clean spot.
  7. Pull the whole dual wheel assembly outwards and off of the axle. My bus has hydraulic brakes and I had to loosen the calipers so they would come out with the wheels.
  8. Once you have the wheel assembly out you'll see the axle seal on the backside of the hub. Pop it out and get the model # off of it. I had a difficult time finding an axle seal that would fit, even though the shops all had cross references. I tried a handful before landing on a style that worked. Axle seals can come in two different formats as well. There are 2-piece seals and 1-piece seals. 2-piece seals seem to be the best, but will require the rental of a special tool to install the metal ring. 1-piece seals are an easy install. You just smack 'em into the wheel hub.
  9. With the axle seal removed you'll see the inner roller bearing. Take it out and put it somewhere safe and clean.
  10. Do a bunch of brake work since everything is accessible
  11. Clean everything up and install the inner bearing and a new seal.
  12. Slide the wheel assembly back onto the axle.
  13. Prefill the hub with gear oil!
  14. Install the outer bearing and the jam nuts. Torque appropriately: Timken Wheel Adjustment Procedures.
  15. Install the axle shaft with some appropriate sealant on the flange. I used copper coloured RTV.
  16. Torque everything back up.
  17. Fill the diff with gear oil. Once it's full jack up one side of the axle to top up the hub. Do the same for the other side. Now check the diff oil level and top up as necessary.

Did I miss anything? Hmmm.. Probably.. It ended up being a bit more involved than I had anticipated.
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Old 10-02-2016, 01:45 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolly Roger View Post
it seams to me that there should be an inner seal at the hog head an outer seal at/near the brake drum and something in there to keep the axle from sliding out on its own?
On mine the only seal on the outer end was RTV sealant between the axle shaft flange and the hub. The inner side housed the actual axle seal.

The tapered roller bearings and jam nuts hold the hub on.
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Old 10-02-2016, 01:53 PM   #15
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Oh, one more thing. Keep a close eye on things when taking the bus out for a spin after all the axle work. Do a couple mile run at highway speed then stop and check hub temperatures.
Also keep an eye on the rear-view mirrors A diesel mechanic friend of mine was called out to a roadside job because a delivery truck could see one of his dually wheel assemblies sliding in and out from the truck as he was driving. That's bad.. Real bad! The jam nuts were loose so the bearings were no longer holding the hub in place on the axle.
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:09 PM   #16
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The only reason I brought up the whole retaining ring thing is because 20-yrs ago? I help a friend change the gears in his race car and it did fine around the yard but when we got to the track he was to mucked up to drive it so I hopped in? Guess what? That axle slung out when I hit 120-mph and bounced me off the wall pretty good?
I haven't seen the inside of a differential or an axle seal since? Mine are good for now even though I do want to change gears and can't find a garage to do it? I am hesitant because of looking for knowledge but I ain't scared of it but you can damn well believe I will put its through its paces before my family ever climbs on it again?
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:11 PM   #17
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I've been told by my diesel mechanic friend that the heavy duty axles don't use retaining rings in the diff. It's all about the bearings and jam nuts.

Light duty vehicles have retaining rings in the diff.

You'll know right away when removing the axle shaft. If you undo the 8 hub bolts and you can slide it out then there is no retaining ring.
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:16 PM   #18
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The videos I have seen of my differential have retaining/ jamb nuts in the diff. And at the wheels ?
The only reason I brought it up to milkman?
I didn't think/know it was as easy as sliding the axles in and out without opening the diff.?
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:20 PM   #19
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What do you have for an axle?

Mine was exactly as easy as that: undo 8 hub bolts, break the RTV seal and pull the axle shaft out. With the axle shaft out the wheels are still fully connected to the axle, but they can't be driven. The axle shaft has nothing to do with holding the wheels on. Nothing at all. You could remove the axle shafts and have a giant soap box derby car!
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Old 10-02-2016, 02:32 PM   #20
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Eaton 16121,16s head 16000 lbs and can't find a replacement that doesn't have exactly the same gear (6.50) and no differential wizard that can/has helped yet?
Have a chance to swap a two speed dump truck rear end but would have to build a cable and spring system to make the two speed rear work with my 545 .
I actually have a cable system that I think would work but I haven't changed to the rear end yet so I am still in the debate stage.
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