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Old 10-02-2016, 03:38 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Oh, one more thing. Keep a close eye on things when taking the bus out for a spin after all the axle work. Do a couple mile run at highway speed then stop and check hub temperatures.
Also keep an eye on the rear-view mirrors A diesel mechanic friend of mine was called out to a roadside job because a delivery truck could see one of his dually wheel assemblies sliding in and out from the truck as he was driving. That's bad.. Real bad! The jam nuts were loose so the bearings were no longer holding the hub in place on the axle.

I had that happen to me in an old pickup where a ^$#^%$^$& C-clip broke in my diff..I could see the wheel going out and was trying to keep it from flying apart till i got it stopped...
-Christopher
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Old 10-02-2016, 04:54 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
I had that happen to me in an old pickup where a ^$#^%$^$& C-clip broke in my diff..I could see the wheel going out and was trying to keep it from flying apart till i got it stopped...
-Christopher
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Old 10-02-2016, 05:41 PM   #23
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Milk is replacing a gasket.

Jazty a seal.

Big difference.
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Old 10-02-2016, 06:14 PM   #24
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Milk is replacing a gasket.

Jazty a seal.

Big difference.
Yeah, if it's just an axle shaft flange gasket, not the axle seal, then it's an easy peasy job! I got tripped up on the wording.
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Old 10-02-2016, 06:31 PM   #25
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Milk is replacing a gasket.

Jazty a seal.

Big difference.
lol

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Old 10-02-2016, 06:33 PM   #26
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Yeah, if it's just an axle shaft flange gasket, not the axle seal, then it's an easy peasy job! I got tripped up on the wording.
That's ok, the Jam Nuts tripped me up!
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Old 10-03-2016, 02:49 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by 2kool4skool View Post
Milk is replacing a gasket.

Jazty a seal.

Big difference.
Huge difference.

Gasket is something most on here could do. Pop the 8 nuts off, pull out the shaft(keep it clean and protect the splines), clean off both mating surfaces, install new gasket or gear oil rtv sealant(what I use), reinstall axle, tighten nuts, top up fluid, raise opposite set of duals(causes the fluid to run to the side you just drained), recheck fluid level, go for a drive.

Replacing a wheel seal is a lot more complicated. Requires special tools depending on the seal and bearing design. Most on here shouldn't try it unless supervised by someone in the know.
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Old 10-03-2016, 02:54 PM   #28
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Eh.. I didn't shy away from the job. As long as you can pay attention to the details (proper torquing procedures!!) and have an OK set of larger sockets you'll be ok. Up to 1.25" is good. The only special tool required for my axle seal job was an additional 3.25" socket to fit the jam nuts and an adapter to make it fit my torque wrench. I'm glad I did the job. I feel smarter and ever more powerful because of it!

Oh, and make some 4"x4" cribbing to support the frame then further support the axle with more blocks.

Check out my post about the procedure if you want a good laugh My 200cc Yamaha Moto4 gave me a hand with the job.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/ar...tml#post153599
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Old 10-03-2016, 03:18 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Eh.. I didn't shy away from the job. As long as you can pay attention to the details (proper torquing procedures!!) and have an OK set of larger sockets you'll be ok. Up to 1.25" is good. The only special tool required for my axle seal job was an additional 3.25" socket to fit the jam nuts and an adapter to make it fit my torque wrench. I'm glad I did the job. I feel smarter and ever more powerful because of it!

Oh, and make some 4"x4" cribbing to support the frame then further support the axle with more blocks.

Check out my post about the procedure if you want a good laugh My 200cc Yamaha Moto4 gave me a hand with the job.
http://www.skoolie.net/forums/f27/armageddon-the-smell-of-airborne-rust-8870-20.html#post153599
Well you impressed me. Most wouldn't have had a torque wrench for it.

But you must have missed the spot about checking the end play. At least I didn't see where you did it. That's the final goal with all of those steps. Most of the times it works out and you don't need to readjust it but it's still something that should be checked. The procedure will also vary slightly based off of whether or not the bearings are new.

PS, I feel phenolic pistons are more likely to sieze because of how soft they are. If you flush your brake fluid every couple of years and have good dust seals (read not torn) the metal pistons should never rust or have a problem.

PPS, Nice foot.
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Old 10-03-2016, 03:33 PM   #30
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My torque wrench tops out at 300lbf*ft which was just enough, going off of the Timken wheel adjustment chart that I looked at before removing a single bolt: http://www.timken.com/en-us/solution...Procedures.pdf
I have a diesel mechanic friend and he said if I follow the tightening procedures to the T I should be well in the ball park for end play. I did skip step 8 (dial indicator), but closely watched the hub temperature for too much preload. Too loose and things will be sloppy and start wearing brake pads, tires, and eventually bearings, but it seems that the real scary problems occur when the preload is too high. About 1000kms since and things are holding well.

One of these days I'll stop by his shop to get a true test on the end play.
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