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Old 09-02-2018, 12:50 PM   #1
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Trouble Finding Parts

I wrote a couple weeks ago about my fuel gauge issues. Well, I've got worse problems now because I got talked into taking it to a Ford Dealership for diagnosis and those bright souls over there filled it up with gasoline instead of diesel before sending me on my way. Didn't fix the original problem either, which they say is the sending unit. They also say the part is obsolete and they can't get one, even aftermarket.

I brought it elsewhere to have the tanks drained and any damage from the gas sorted out, because I don't trust them to touch my truck now (though they WILL pay for it, you can be sure of that). But the guy who dealt with it told me future problems may arise. Sure enough, a day later (on the weekend and when I am prepping for a show that is half my income for the year), the fuel filter light came on and it sputtered to a stop.

So... I have an actual school bus mechanic coming to my house to work on it tomorrow. I won't know exactly what's needed until he pulls the tanks but the one thing I DO feel sure of is that it does have that original sending unit issue. As far as I've been able to determine, the dealer was right in that this part is not showing up as available anywhere. Has anyone had this problem, and anyone have any idea how I might locate the part or rig some other one to fit? That is if the one in there isn't fixable. I know it's premature because he hasn't even looked at it yet but I'm trying to get a jump on things so it goes as fast as possible and I can get to my show.
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Old 09-02-2018, 02:30 PM   #2
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You can do without a fuel gauge, really you can. As long as you always fill the tank you can use miles driven based on your fuel mileage

I certainly wouldn't be dropping the tank just because you ran some gasoline through it. Drain the tank, fill it up with diesel, change the fuel filter and see how it acts. Buy some extra fuel filters, and learn how to change them. just in case.

When I was in the Navy, idiots used to fill our diesels with gas all the time. Other than being a pain in the neck we never had any engine damage to any of them. They did rattle and carry on when they had gas in them though.
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Old 09-02-2018, 03:49 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by somewhereinusa View Post
You can do without a fuel gauge, really you can. As long as you always fill the tank you can use miles driven based on your fuel mileage

I certainly wouldn't be dropping the tank just because you ran some gasoline through it. Drain the tank, fill it up with diesel, change the fuel filter and see how it acts. Buy some extra fuel filters, and learn how to change them. just in case.
It's not about the gauge. Sure I could live without it. But I'm the kind of person who runs out of gas even when my gauge is NOT broken, so it's better for all involved if i fix it as long as other work is being done anyway.

As for the gasoline in the system, I'm glad your experience with it was so benign. My former boyfriend (who is one of the most mechanical savvy people I know) found it cheaper to have his engine replaced than to fix all the damage done by gasoline.
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Old 09-02-2018, 04:51 PM   #4
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It all depends how much gasoline was burnt in the engine, and how hard the engine was working. The problems arise from gasoline's lack of lubrication which can cause wear in the fuel injection pump and injectors, all of which have incredibly fine tolerances inside them. Diesel is called Fuel Oil for a reason! If you didn't drive much, there's probably no discernible damage to the engine, so don't worry. Either way, the idiot dealership needs to acknowledge their cockup and agree to reimburse you for all resultant costs (including the possibility of replacing fuel system components).

John
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Old 09-02-2018, 05:08 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Iceni John View Post
It all depends how much gasoline was burnt in the engine, and how hard the engine was working. The problems arise from gasoline's lack of lubrication which can cause wear in the fuel injection pump and injectors, all of which have incredibly fine tolerances inside them. Diesel is called Fuel Oil for a reason! If you didn't drive much, there's probably no discernible damage to the engine, so don't worry. Either way, the idiot dealership needs to acknowledge their cockup and agree to reimburse you for all resultant costs (including the possibility of replacing fuel system components).

John
I drove for about 20 miles, I think. Had no idea at all there was gas in there until much later. Of course they say they didn't do it but there is no one else who could have. I think I'm going to have to take them to small claims to get them to take responsibility.
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Old 09-02-2018, 05:16 PM   #6
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need to check something....

so fuel senders send out a signal based on voltage

type one, low voltage is low fuel and high voltage is high fuel

type two, lowvoltage is high fuel and low voltage is low fuel

I would bet that taking the mechanism -- not the float -- but the part the wipes back and forth with the float arm. would interchange, but this means you have to take out the float part on the bus now, walk into a parts store, and compare with other diesel ford models, like trucks, and gasoline buses and look and compare ... my experience says you could mix and match parts to repair your part.

william
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Old 09-02-2018, 05:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by magnakansas View Post
so fuel senders send out a signal based on voltage

type one, low voltage is low fuel and high voltage is high fuel

type two, lowvoltage is high fuel and low voltage is low fuel

I would bet that taking the mechanism -- not the float -- but the part the wipes back and forth with the float arm. would interchange, but this means you have to take out the float part on the bus now, walk into a parts store, and compare with other diesel ford models, like trucks, and gasoline buses and look and compare ... my experience says you could mix and match parts to repair your part.

william
Thanks for this info!
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