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Old 09-11-2019, 12:38 AM   #21
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
I bought one of these and uses HVAC tape to tape sensors to metal inlet and outlet of radiators, A/C coils and the like for various testing... you can get sensors with longer wires..


https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

That looks like an excellent diagnostic tool. It has quite a range of temperatures it can measure! However, at $158.00 I will have to wait untill I can afford to make such a purchase. Thank you VERY much for the link and the fine tool idea.
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Old 09-15-2019, 03:39 AM   #22
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Year: 2002
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Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
I have been reading through a very good document from CAT called "Know your Cooling System":


CAT KnowYourCoolingSystem.pdf


They indicate that by monitoring 6 points in the cooling system, the problem can be determined:


1. Radiator top tank
2. Radiator bottom tank or water pump inlet
3. Water pump outlet or oil cooler inlet
4. Water temperature regulator housing
5. Torque converter oil outlet
6. Engine oil manifold or oil cooler outlet


So two of those nice temperature monitors would be handy. I am not yet done reading the document, but perhaps it can shed more light on the subject for me.
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Old 09-15-2019, 06:32 AM   #23
Bus Geek
 
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ive always measured trans temp in the pan.. but measuring fluid temp going into and out of the cooling loops to the radiator would be a good indication of how much loadthe trans puts on the cooling system..


radiator inlet and outlet are also good as they let you know if your radiator and fan are actually doing anything.. ie is there a temp drop across the coils?


as for my temp logger.. sure i can (and will) build something much cheaper, however I do a lot of stuff with A/C.. both in my own and helping people get their Home and car / Bus A/C working , installed, etc.. so measuring temperatures easily is important.. plus im admittedly a tool-geek. so if I can put a tool in my tool-box that I'll use more than once I'll likely do it.. lol
-Christopher
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Old 09-15-2019, 08:49 AM   #24
Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 141
International cluster freeze is a easy fix. Go to YouTube and see how the guru fixed it. International cluster freeze google itCheers
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Old 09-16-2019, 01:28 AM   #25
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Posts: 796
Year: 2002
Coachwork: Thomas Built Bus
Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by cadillackid View Post
ive always measured trans temp in the pan.. but measuring fluid temp going into and out of the cooling loops to the radiator would be a good indication of how much loadthe trans puts on the cooling system..


radiator inlet and outlet are also good as they let you know if your radiator and fan are actually doing anything.. ie is there a temp drop across the coils?


as for my temp logger.. sure i can (and will) build something much cheaper, however I do a lot of stuff with A/C.. both in my own and helping people get their Home and car / Bus A/C working , installed, etc.. so measuring temperatures easily is important.. plus im admittedly a tool-geek. so if I can put a tool in my tool-box that I'll use more than once I'll likely do it.. lol
-Christopher

I learned today that a temperature difference of 6 to 9 degrees (F) between the top tank of the radiator and the bottom tank is a healthy radiator. I'll be flushing the coolant system tomorrow and will take IR gun measurements of the top and bottom tanks.


I'd love to see your home brewed temperature logger when you have made it.
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Old 09-16-2019, 09:39 AM   #26
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2014
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Engine: 6.9 International
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Native View Post
I have been reading through a very good document from CAT called "Know your Cooling System":


Attachment 37541


They indicate that by monitoring 6 points in the cooling system, the problem can be determined:


1. Radiator top tank
2. Radiator bottom tank or water pump inlet
3. Water pump outlet or oil cooler inlet
4. Water temperature regulator housing
5. Torque converter oil outlet
6. Engine oil manifold or oil cooler outlet


So two of those nice temperature monitors would be handy. I am not yet done reading the document, but perhaps it can shed more light on the subject for me.
Now you're on to something. That is a pretty good article.
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Old 09-16-2019, 09:41 AM   #27
Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 141
For what it’s worth- I run four international trucks in a fleet. One truck got a newer engine with more beans for hp. It’s been overheating and after spending time on a racing engine forum tracing radiator issues I have discovered the simplest fix!Airflow- The fan blows plenty of air but the hood vents are t large enough to
Let the hot air pass out and away from the engine. So a McGyver fix was to open the hood an additional 3/4” to let the volume of air out. I will be enlarging the tiny vents in the fiberglass hood and adding two or three 2” holes to the left and right fender well. So open that hood and see if that makes any changes.
Cheers
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Old 09-16-2019, 10:23 AM   #28
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: May 2014
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Umm, on most trucks your hot radiator air will pass through the engine compartment and exit toward the ground and wheel wells, not out the hood.
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Old 09-16-2019, 02:37 PM   #29
Skoolie
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 141
Well, check the edge of the hood - my 275hp and 330hp unit’s have vent holes along the edge. I’ll snapA photo and show ya later. But I’ve been hauling heavy 38,000 payloads up to a job site, When I opened the hood to Let More air evacuate the engine compartment the temp
Dropped quickly and the next 10 deliveries to the same site the engine didn’t overheat.
Cheers
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Old 09-17-2019, 02:17 AM   #30
Bus Nut
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Chassis: Freightliner FS65
Engine: Caterpillar 3126E Diesel
Rated Cap: 71 Passenger- 30,000 lbs.
Thank you for the replies!


In this FS-65, the fan blows the air down under the engine, even with the hood open. I was a bit surprised the first time I noticed this. Some air does go over the engine and to other parts of the compartment, but the volume moves down.
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