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Old 10-12-2015, 11:49 AM   #11
Bus Crazy
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Salt Lake City Utah
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Year: 2000
Chassis: Blue Bird
Engine: ISC 8.3
Do you need any pointers on re-priming the fuel system after changing the filter(s)? Diesel injectors won't "pop off" if there's too much air in the injection line, so the system can become stubbornly stuck in a non-running state. Makes it somewhere between PITA and impossible to get the engine running again. Fortunately it's quite easy to avoid and/or fix if you know what to do.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:51 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tango View Post
I have a friend who was a diesel tech for 20+ years, but only on Detroits.
Boy howdy, do I have a riddle I'd like him to solve for me now!!
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Old 10-12-2015, 10:38 PM   #13
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Attn. Family wagon:
Yes please! Of course lol I'm not very mechanically inclined and also poor so yeah I need all the help I can get.
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Old 10-12-2015, 10:41 PM   #14
Skoolie
 
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Hmmmm I wonder if Cummins offers classes probably expensive if they do.
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Old 10-12-2015, 11:05 PM   #15
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You really dont need to take a class. Read around the net and watch youtube. Save your money
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Old 10-13-2015, 12:53 AM   #16
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Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
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Any classes you find won't cover the engine you have. They will focus on the newer electronic crap on the newer crap engines.

You own the most simple engine ever made. That's why I own 4 of them.

Nat
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Old 10-13-2015, 07:57 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by charles_m View Post
You really dont need to take a class. Read around the net and watch youtube. Save your money
Winner winner chicken dinner!
Our local diesel tech program at the county tech school only teaches the most basic stuff and it takes thousands of dollars and a year or so of one's time. They only teach you enough to make you frustrated.
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:41 PM   #18
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Engine: ISC 8.3
OK, so you have a '97 Cummins 5.9L. It must be the mechanical injected B model. I haven't worked on a B engine.. my pickup has the electronic ISB version that came out a year after yours and my bus has the electronic ISC. But I also have in the stable construction equipment with one each of Yanmar, Deutz, and John Deere mechanical injected 3 and 4 cylinder engines. Hopefully what I've learned among these will be helpful here.

General ideas: do the job at a place and time where it'll be OK if it sits for a few days in case it proves challenging to re-start the engine. When it comes time to crank the engine, don't run the starter for long period of time (it needs to cool off) and don't run it 'til the battery is dead (that damages the battery). Have an idea in mind how you'll get the battery re-charged if necessary. Jump starting isn't likely to work out because if it were close enough to starting that a brief jump-starting crank could do the job, it would already be running before running its own battery down.. I don't know whether this truly matters or not, but it makes me feel better: run the engine a few minutes to warm it up slightly before beginning. A warm engine starts more easily than a cold engine does.

Changing the filter is pretty straightforward. Find and clean the filter area to prevent dirt getting into the fuel system. The filter might be a spin-on disposable can like an engine oil filter, or it might be replaceable media in a permanent housing. My pickup uses the housing style; my others use the spin-on style. Post pictures if you need help identifying the filter. Anyway, remove the old filter and be sure its gaskets aren't left behind, lube the gaskets on the new filter with clean fuel or engine oil, and reassemble. I'm not sure whether to recommend pre-filling the filter with fuel or not..

If the engine has an electric lift pump, or might have one, do the following. "Bump" the starter (turn the key to start, and release it back to the run position fast as you can after you hear the starter pick up). Wait 20 seconds; the lift pump will continue to run. Repeat 3 times or so. Now crank the engine. It will probably start normally, then just as you breath a sigh of relief, it'll stumble. If you're lucky it'll pull through and the idle will become smooth again, or it'll die but restart without much cranking. This is all I've ever had to do when changing the fuel filter on my pickup.
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:41 PM   #19
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Engine: ISC 8.3
If, however, the engine doesn't have an electric lift pump or if it doesn't just start and run nicely, then you'll have to bleed the air out of the injection system. Once you have the technique down it's not hard and takes just a few minutes, but I still remember how stressful and frustrating it was to find my way from "general idea" to "technique that works." Kind of like bleeding hydraulic brakes not realizing that you can't release the pedal first and tighten the bleeder screw second.

Loosen the nut holding the fuel tube on one injector (any one that looks easy to get to) and start cranking the engine. Eye protection is a good idea because the fuel system runs rather high pressure and can spray a small stream of fuel a good distance while that tube is loose. Crank the engine as long as maybe 10 seconds, then stop and let the starter cool a while. You'll see bubbles and fuel begin leaking out of the loose connection. Watch for it to transition to mostly fuel with few bubbles, and snug the nut while the engine is still turning (an assistant is probably necessary). If you're semi-lucky the engine will begin sputtering, stumbling, and finally kind of running during this process. As you tighten the nut the engine should smooth out. If the idle doesn't smooth out, or if the engine doesn't run at all and leakage from the one loose connection gets to be quite "squirty" with minimal air bubble content, then there's air trapped in other line(s) too. Follow the same procedure (loosen the nut, crank the engine, tighten the nut, release the starter) on each injector line in turn until finally the engine starts and idles smooth.
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Old 10-13-2015, 10:59 PM   #20
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Chassis: TC2000 FE
Engine: 190hp 5.9 Cummins
Rated Cap: 72
Family wagon speaks much good info.

If it says "Cummins 24 valve" on top, it's a electronic engine.

If it doesn't, it's a 12 valve fully mechanical engine.

No need to crank the engine to prime the fuel system in either engine family.

The electronic engine, simply turn the key the first click. That will energize the pump and prime the fuel system.

The mechanical engine has a primer lever on the left side of the engine, when looking from the drivers seat forward. It will take as few as 50 strokes, to 200 strokes to prime out the air.

If the engine was running before removing the filter, simply fill the new filter full of fuel before spinning it on. Most times I don't have to bleed or prime anything after. Less than 30 seconds of cranking and the engine starts right up.

Never crank the engine for more than 10 second bursts. If you do, you will be replacing the starter next. They are not cheap.

Nat
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