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Old 03-09-2016, 07:56 PM   #21
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A quart every two hundred miles is a lot of oil going somewhere. Have you crawled all under the engine and tranny to see if there is evidence of it coming out at any other locations? And I have to agree that an oil analysis might be a good idea. Amazing how specific the results can be.
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Old 03-09-2016, 08:25 PM   #22
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oil is everywhere on the bottom of the engine, originally thought it was coming from the front main, since there was so much ( I think you crawled up under it too?) My plan - unless I hear a better one, is to attach a bottle at the end of the hose, drive it around, to see how much I catch. If I catch very little, yet still drip greatly, I will look for other sources. Trying to contain what is coming out to make sure it is not coming from elsewhere.

Any other ideas?
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Old 03-09-2016, 08:32 PM   #23
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Maybe a quick steam clean then keep an eye out for the culprit area?

The bottle is a good idea too.
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Old 03-09-2016, 08:38 PM   #24
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I would start by cleaning everything off so that there is no black gunk anywhere under the bus.

It may appear that a leak is coming from a location only to discover that the leak is starting somewhere else.

Besides, leaving all that black gunk there makes working on anything under there an icky mess. It is also a fire hazard.

Speaking of road draft tubes, back in the day you could have interesting things happen with them.

A friend of mine had a 1959 Ford with a I-6 that didn't use a drop of oil unless you went long distances at 80+ MPH. After long speed runs his crankcase was almost dry. What my friend determined what was happening was that at great rates of speed the draft tube would create a vacuum and suck oil out of the crankcase.

I am not saying that is what is happening with you. But stranger things have happened.

Good luck and keep us posted as to your progress.
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Old 03-10-2016, 11:27 AM   #25
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Reason I asked about the oil, I've seen that if you change from a standard oil like rotella 15w40 and switch to a synthetic, over time the oil consumption raises by quite a bit. Not sure if it's the oil switch, or that the engine is just worn out from use. It's just something that I've noticed. It also always seems to be one of those super duper best on the market oils like amsoil or schaeffers. You know, the guys that come around with their test rig to prove how their oil is far beyond better then the rest.
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Old 03-10-2016, 11:44 AM   #26
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Dred: The catch bottle idea is a good way to help pinpoint the leak. Was going to suggest that yesterday but got busy. Seems I did that myself one time on a piece of heavy equipment. Have you run the engine at, or near, cruising rpm and watch that hose? If you don't have a good hand throttle you may need a helper to keep the rpm's up for a minute or two so you can watch closely.
Maybe you've allready done this, but you could have someone follow you on a drive and watch your tailpipe. Make sure to include some hills, downgrades etc. I know you said there's no smoke but sometimes it's hard to see it in your rear-view. Sure seems like excessive cunsumption for the milage. And to come on quicky like that, acts more like a seal has let-go. The video you show doesn't look any different than my 97 dodge 5.9 with about the same milage on it. I would take a vid of it and show you if I could get it to start. But I have starter issues right now and no helper to give me a pull-start. However I see lots of drops coming off your axle there so I think that catch bottle is realy going to help to narrow things down there.
And here all along I thought I was the only one who has to deal with oddball un-explainable mechanical issues. Welcome to the club!
Cheers and good luck:
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Old 03-10-2016, 12:19 PM   #27
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I too like the bottle idea, would have never though of that..this forum sure is cool..
Bounce things around see what sticks.

As for the oil, synthetic is a great oil if you start your engine from new using it.
When you change to it mid life of the engine it has so many more cleaning properties
That cut the everything loose, then it will start to leak and use oil that it never did before.
I have seen this first hand..
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Old 03-10-2016, 02:38 PM   #28
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Had a customer once with a VW Rabbit that was dumping oil out the breather
hose from the valve cover to the Air filter. He took the hose off the air cleaner
and put it into a 1 quart oil bottle and every week or so would pour it back into
the engine. Worked good for him and he didn't have any more oil covered air
air filters to replace.
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Old 03-10-2016, 04:19 PM   #29
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not the breather hose, but still baffled by the leak, looks like a gasket, but what the hell is this massive engine mount bracket, and WHY is it leaking oil?

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Old 03-10-2016, 05:14 PM   #30
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The area your looking at looks to be the flange where the Air compressor
bolts to the flange on the engine block. I believe there is a gasket between
the compressor and the block which may have cracked. Or you may have a
front seal on the air compressor that has given out and is dumping oil. The
air compressor uses engine oil for lubrication and can dump engine oil when
the front seal goes bad. My suggestion would be to add some infrared dye
to the oil and trace your leak with a black light and glasses designed for the
purpose. Most auto supply stores sell a kit to do the job or goggle leak detector
kit for engine oil.
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