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Old 03-10-2017, 11:14 AM   #1
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AC electrical panel

So I am setting up with genny and shore power. The power from the genny will be G-N bonded like the shore power. So in the AC circuit breaker box the ground and neutral wires in from the plugs attach to the same grounding bars

TRUE _____

FALSE _____

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Old 03-10-2017, 12:09 PM   #2
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False.

Neutral and ground should be bonded in the service panel for your shore power hookup and in your generator. NOT in your coach panel. If you have them bonded in the coach panel and you plug into GFCI protected shore power you will have problems.
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Old 03-10-2017, 01:00 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by PNW_Steve View Post
False.

Neutral and ground should be bonded in the service panel for your shore power hookup and in your generator. NOT in your coach panel. If you have them bonded in the coach panel and you plug into GFCI protected shore power you will have problems.

What Steve said.
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Old 03-10-2017, 01:48 PM   #4
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Each source of power grounds neutral at the source. Not in the coach panel. Just stop by Home Depot and pick up a ground bar for your panel. They are about $7. Then move all the grounds to it. And do not install the ground neutral bonding screw in the panel.

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Old 03-10-2017, 02:03 PM   #5
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I thought so
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Old 03-10-2017, 02:03 PM   #6
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What Bill said....
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:23 PM   #7
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I see you haven't hooked up the line side of the panel I hope, anyway. If you have there are serious issues with what you have on those breakers.
I assume that is the feed in the pvc conduit?
Perhaps you can tell us what you have there wired to the breakers. I see single pole breakers, two pole breakers by the look of it and one 15amp two pole breaker, along with three 20 amp breakers, some two pole and some single pole.
Your knowledge worries me so I hope we can help you out here. many knowledgeable electrical minds here so don't be shy to a
ask if you don't understand. Better than being dead, blind or burnt.
More electrocutions happen with 110 V than any other, go figure. Not something to guess at.
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Old 03-10-2017, 03:41 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackJohn View Post
I see you haven't hooked up the line side of the panel I hope, anyway. If you have there are serious issues with what you have on those breakers.
I assume that is the feed in the pvc conduit?
Perhaps you can tell us what you have there wired to the breakers. I see single pole breakers, two pole breakers by the look of it and one 15amp two pole breaker, along with three 20 amp breakers, some two pole and some single pole.
Your knowledge worries me so I hope we can help you out here. many knowledgeable electrical minds here so don't be shy to a
ask if you don't understand. Better than being dead, blind or burnt.
More electrocutions happen with 110 V than any other, go figure. Not something to guess at.
It looks like they are all single pole breakers to me. They are tandem circuit.

Most of us will never deal with an electrical inspection. A word of caution if you find yourself facing an electrical inspector: many jurisdictions no longer allow tandem breakers.
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Old 03-10-2017, 04:59 PM   #9
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The 15 amp breaker is the type used for split kitchen receptacles, for two circuits of 15 amp with a common neutral. Not sure what you are looking at but not what I see.
The three 20amp breakers are of the same design and used for electric heat mostly or some other device needing 220 V. They are two pole same as the 15 amp breaker.
Not sure why any 20's would be needed at all when the supply will only be 30 amp max. If it is 30 amp then those wires need to be at least #10 feeding the whole panel.
Inspection isn't what I was worried about. Wiring like that voids any insurance and can be deadly. I'd rather be safe knowing nothing is heating up through useage and possibly trapping the occupants while sleeping or whatever they are doing that needs electricity.
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Old 03-10-2017, 06:30 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackJohn View Post
The 15 amp breaker is the type used for split kitchen receptacles, for two circuits of 15 amp with a common neutral. Not sure what you are looking at but not what I see.
The three 20amp breakers are of the same design and used for electric heat mostly or some other device needing 220 V. They are two pole same as the 15 amp breaker.
Not sure why any 20's would be needed at all when the supply will only be 30 amp max. If it is 30 amp then those wires need to be at least #10 feeding the whole panel.
Inspection isn't what I was worried about. Wiring like that voids any insurance and can be deadly. I'd rather be safe knowing nothing is heating up through useage and possibly trapping the occupants while sleeping or whatever they are doing that needs electricity.
Look closer at the picture, there are no 2 pole breakers, and read the following:

http://www.nfpa.org/codes-and-standa...e=code&code=70
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