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Old 08-21-2018, 09:30 PM   #1
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Appliance Power Consumption Log

After doing Kil-A-Watt readings on some of my appliances to ensure my planned system could handle them, it occurred to me that a forum database of people's real world power draw would be extremely useful. If you have some data, please share it.

I'll start with the 4 Items I have tested.

Toaster- Proctor and Gamble T-35
Peak Consumption= 785W
Total Consumption Toasting 2 Slices=.044Kwh

Coffee Maker- Ninja Cafetiere
Idle=.7W
Peak Consumption= 1400W
Total Consumption Brewing 12 Cup Carafe=.142Kwh

Cooktop- Copper Chef Induction Cooktop
Idle=.8W
Peak Consumption=1300W
Total Consumption Cooking-
Chicken Liver & Onions W/Gravy (23 1/2 Min Cook
time)=.344Kwh
Bacon & Eggs=.17Kwh

7.0 Cubic Foot Chest Freezer- Insignia NS-CZ70WH6
(Tested In Store)
Peak Consumption (Locked Rotor)=900W
Running Consumption=80W

I hope somebody trying to figure out how much power they need finds this useful, and I hope others share.

Casey
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Old 08-22-2018, 06:00 AM   #2
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Fridgadaire 4.7 cu ft fridge with freezer
45 watts
320 watts for a 24 hour period, set on medium
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Old 08-22-2018, 08:54 AM   #3
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Viewsonic 22" LED monitor - 0.15kwhr (9.25hrs)

Box fan (don't know brand... sorry) - 0.66kwhr (10hrs)

Macbook Pro (2014 15" screen) - 0.14kwhr (2hr charge time)


That's all I've collected so far. Well... that's all I've written down so far. I keep forgetting...
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Old 08-22-2018, 01:35 PM   #4
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Thanx guys, who knew a box fan needed more power than cooking breakfast and dinner combined . That's the kind of stuff you won't read in a data sheet.
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Old 08-22-2018, 03:02 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaseyBrown View Post
Thanx guys, who knew a box fan needed more power than cooking breakfast and dinner combined . That's the kind of stuff you won't read in a data sheet.
You're comparing apples to oranges. If you compare the box fan usage over the same period as breakfast, the fan is cheaper. You were comparing the numbers of 24 minutes for breakfast compared to 10hrs of fan use.
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Old 08-22-2018, 03:15 PM   #6
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Awesome thread!

Thanks to all who have shared.
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Old 08-22-2018, 04:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by o1marc View Post
You're comparing apples to oranges. If you compare the box fan usage over the same period as breakfast, the fan is cheaper. You were comparing the numbers of 24 minutes for breakfast compared to 10hrs of fan use.
Missing the point..the idea is to log power used by devices in the real world in the course of an average day.

In this context it is "apples to apples"

Casey
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Old 08-22-2018, 04:50 PM   #8
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Presumably this thread is to help people plan their power needs when running from generator and battery sources (including solar). Keep in mind that when using a DC power source any of the appliances that run on AC power will have to be run through an inverter, which requires its own power to be considered as well. For some loads I have seen inverters operating at only 50% efficiency, meaning a 100 watt load was actually consuming 200 watts of stored power. Resistive loads (like toasters and other things with heating elements) are hard to supply power to, and loads where you're converting more than once (laptop charger, anything with a power brick/wall wart) are stacking inefficient conversions on top of each other.

If you're installing a solar or otherwise charged battery bank, you can save a lot of power by running DC appliances instead of AC ones, and powering DC appliances directly from DC power. The conversion between AC and DC power can be very expensive, avoid doing it multiple times!

Some things are easier than others, of course. You can't just plug any old refrigerator into 12v, you would need one designed specifically for 12v. But some things are easy. laptop chargers, phone chargers, lighting, fans, routers...

Remember, every watt you don't consume is a watt you don't have to produce and store! Being efficient pays off big time.
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Old 08-22-2018, 05:06 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokedown View Post
Presumably this thread is to help people plan their power needs when running from generator and battery sources (including solar). Keep in mind that when using a DC power source any of the appliances that run on AC power will have to be run through an inverter, which requires its own power to be considered as well. For some loads I have seen inverters operating at only 50% efficiency, meaning a 100 watt load was actually consuming 200 watts of stored power. Resistive loads (like toasters and other things with heating elements) are hard to supply power to, and loads where you're converting more than once (laptop charger, anything with a power brick/wall wart) are stacking inefficient conversions on top of each other.

If you're installing a solar or otherwise charged battery bank, you can save a lot of power by running DC appliances instead of AC ones, and powering DC appliances directly from DC power. The conversion between AC and DC power can be very expensive, avoid doing it multiple times!

Some things are easier than others, of course. You can't just plug any old refrigerator into 12v, you would need one designed specifically for 12v. But some things are easy. laptop chargers, phone chargers, lighting, fans, routers...

Remember, every watt you don't consume is a watt you don't have to produce and store! Being efficient pays off big time.
All true. This is just some more data points that I haven't seen anywhere else. On the inverter thing, I have found the closer to max on the inverter, the higher the efficiency, for example drawing 50 watts off a 3 kW inverter your getting down to the 50% range. I plan to run constant loads that have to run on inverter (chest freezer fridge conversion) on a dedicated inverter sized for the load.

Casey
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Old 08-22-2018, 05:58 PM   #10
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Keep in mind that your freezer will have a start surge that can be 2x or 3x the continuous draw. Mine would consume 150-ish watts running from inverter power but could briefly pull 400w at start-up! Also, a MSW inverter can be much less efficient than a PSW inverter for things with motors, refrigerators and air conditioners are the common examples of things they're bad at.
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Old 08-22-2018, 06:46 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brokedown View Post
Keep in mind that your freezer will have a start surge that can be 2x or 3x the continuous draw. Mine would consume 150-ish watts running from inverter power but could briefly pull 400w at start-up! Also, a MSW inverter can be much less efficient than a PSW inverter for things with motors, refrigerators and air conditioners are the common examples of things they're bad at.
Yup..I noted the 900 Watt startup (Locked Rotor) in my first post. I would also say using a MSW inverter on any motor is a bad idea.

Casey
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Old 09-01-2018, 04:23 PM   #12
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Local library

Has the device to check out and there is a card listing expected outputs from crockpot to freezers!Has been a couple of years since I had it in my hands. I am a warm body on the local library board.
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Old 09-01-2018, 06:35 PM   #13
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What I have found or measured...

This list shows watts at 115 +/- volts. Multiply by hours used per day to get kwh/day. Factor in your inverters efficiency if coming from a 12v source.
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Coffee Maker 600-1200
Keurig 1500 (max) 200-400 (continuous)
Blender 300-1000
Microwave (600-1000 Watt Cooking Power) 1000-2000
Waffle Iron 800-1500
Hot Plate 750-1500
Electric Skillet 1000-1500
Toaster Oven 1200
Toaster 800-1500
Hair Dryer 1000-1875
Vacuum Cleaner 300-1500
Space Heater 750 / 1500
Clothes Iron 1000-1500
Refrigerator 500-750
Chest Freezer 600
Washing Machine 500-1000
Furnace Fan 750-1200
Household Fan 50-120
Clock Radio 10-50
Stereo 30-100
Cell Phone Charger 10
Laptop Computer 20-75
MacBook Pro 85
iPad / Tablet 10-20
Desktop with Monitor 200-400
Inkjet Printer 15-75
Laser Printer 500 (continuous) 2000 (peak)
Aquarium 50-1000
TV 32" LED/LCD 50
Blu-Ray or DVD Player 15
Satellite Dish / Receiver 20-30
Video Game Console (Xbox / PS4 / Wii) 40-140
PUMPS AND AIR CONDITIONERS
* Well Pump 1/3 hp 750 (Running) 1400-3000 (Starting)
* Well Pump 1/2 hp 1000 (Running) 2100-4000 (Starting)
* Sump Pump 1/3 hp 800 (Running) 1300-2900 (Starting)
* Sump Pump 1/2 hp 1050 (Running) 2150-4100 (Starting)
* Air Conditioner (7,000 BTU) 1000 (Running) 2200 (Starting)
* Air Conditioner (10,000 BTU) 1500 (Running) 5000 (Starting)
TOOLS
Angle Grinder 900
Drill (1/4"-1/2") 500-960
Disc Sander 1200
Jig Saw 300-700
Band Saw 700-1200
Table Saw 1800
Circular Saw 1400-1800
Chop / Cut Off Saw 1500-1800
Shop Vac 6.5 hp 1440
* Electric Chain Saw 14" 1200
* Airless Sprayer 1/2 hp 750
* Air Compressor 1 hp 2000
MY STUFF [TESTED]
Air conditioner “5000btu” 350 softstart
Microwave
Table saw 250-1300
Miter saw 124
Circular saw 1000-1200
Metal Chop saw 600-1200
Welder 40-1700
bench grinder 600-700
hand grinder 360-560
Drill press 330-480
Shop Vac hp
Air Compressor 1 hp
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Old 09-01-2018, 08:57 PM   #14
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Interesting stuff. Thanks for posting it. Jack
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Old 09-03-2018, 08:04 AM   #15
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Air compressor & conditioner

Older Harbor Freight pancake air compressor=10.5 A, 121V, 1185W

New (Home Depot) LG 6000BTU window air conditioner = rated at 4.9A, 120V.

This unit starts the circulation fan at 0.31A then slowly...slowly climbs up in amps as the compressor cools the air. The unit climbs 1 /10 amp at a time. It took about ten minutes for the AC to climb to 4.20 A (it was still climbing when I shut it off). The air started getting noticeably cooler around 3.5 Amps.
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