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Old 08-12-2016, 01:01 PM   #1
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Best way to vent a battery box?

I'm thinking of building my battery storage into the sofa that I'm making and had some questions. If I go with traditional lead acid batteries (i.e. 4 Trojan T105), I will need to seal the box and vent it to the exterior. Do I need to run a fan to extract the air, or is passive venting enough? What about heat, how much space should the batteries have?

If I go with AGM batteries, do I need to seal and vent like I do with the above batteries?

Am I better off building some sort of battery storage/box under the floor?

Decisions decisions!

Thanks
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Old 08-12-2016, 01:49 PM   #2
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its recommended that all batteries be vented in case of over-charge.. somewhere I posted in a thread about information i had with a battery expert on the subject of venting..

with AGM batteries the main issue comes with a "what-if" scenerio in that your charger went off in never-land and overcharged the batteries. AGM batteries will exhaust if over-charged.. regular lead acid batteries are unsealed and exhaust anytime they are charged..

Christopher
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Old 08-12-2016, 02:16 PM   #3
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It is better for many reasons safety wise to build and install your batteries outside of the living area.
I have seen RV,s with the batteries in the living area but the entire area under the sofa(for example) was vented to the outside which allowed water/moisture inside which ruined the flooring? The owners blamed it on the water tank next to the batteries?
I pulled the tank,tested it outside on blocks and no leaks? So I pulled the flooring in the area and you could see the water marks from the louvre's/registers leaking but the mold starting to grow around the inside edges of them should have been the sign but at first I was going off of the owners opinion until I had proof. There dime my time at the time. Wasn't my normal job. Just trying to help a neighbor?
Something to think about any open air vent into a conditioned space is sometimes positive pressure which means your losing heat/air and sometimes a negative pressure which means you taking in outside air that your heat and air have to work to over come and for a battery bank it needs to be open all the time so either build a sealed compartment in the bus that is vented or build one under side that can breathe on its own?
Food for thought.
Good luck.
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Old 08-14-2016, 12:28 PM   #4
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Thanks, I think I'm going to look into external battery storage.
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Old 08-14-2016, 02:15 PM   #5
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Hi,

I was fortunate to have space in the battery compartment under the bus so 2 more trojan T105 batteries along side the bus batt.
I drilled three 3" holes with a hole saw at the upper sides (hydrogen is lighter than air and rises )

Good luck!
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Old 08-14-2016, 03:54 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Carytowncat View Post
Hi,

I was fortunate to have space in the battery compartment under the bus so 2 more trojan T105 batteries along side the bus batt.
I drilled three 3" holes with a hole saw at the upper sides (hydrogen is lighter than air and rises )

Good luck!

How would your fumes exit out from under the skirt while sitting?
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Old 08-14-2016, 05:40 PM   #7
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The Roach motel did a pretty cool inside battery box.

Here's a picture of the roach motels battery box from that page.


I also built my vented battery box inside my bus at the stairwell. Since I am not qualified to tell you if that was a good or bad idea (I don't even have my batteries in there yet), I'll leave that to the judgement of yourself and others. I included a picture below, at Jack's advisal I relocated my computer fan to the other vent so it would push the air through rather than pull (to avoid a spark combusting hydrogen). . In an ideal world my out vent would be above the box, but it's not. There are 3 main reasons I built my battery box here.

1. I want my batteries easy to access, clean and maintain.
2. I want my batteries in a similar climate/temperature as myself.
3. I couldn't figure out where to mount a battery box beneath the bus which would be in accordance of the prior two ideals, nor could I find the skills, courage, or ingenuity to do so.
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Old 08-14-2016, 07:57 PM   #8
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The external battery vent in the picture came from DyersRV.com but it wasn't long enough to reach my box so I connected it to a piece of sink trap so I could easily unscrew the union to remove the box lid. The vent hose is tilted slightly down so rainwater can't back up into the box. I also coated the inside of the box with fiberglass resin so the acid fumes wouldn't eat the plywood. All plywood seams are well sealed and the top has a closed cell foam gasket to keep battery fumes from eating the electronics in the same closet.

MTS Replacement Battery Box Vent Accessory Kit - Polar White - Batteries Boxes & Accessories - Batteries & Battery Supplies - Electrical

You definitely want easy access to your batteries so you can add water once in a while. The harder you use your battery bank, the more often they will need topped off. We use ours very lightly and I typically need to top them off once a year.

If you camp in cold weather batteries that are warm inside the bus will give you more power than batteries outside in the cold.
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Old 08-14-2016, 09:44 PM   #9
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oh yeah huh...

Quote:
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How would your fumes exit out from under the skirt while sitting?
good point,
hmmm...

I'll toss a lit match down there every few hours to burn off the hydrogen...

My thinking is that the randown air flow from wind disperses the gas, and when i go to open the battery door i kind of fan the air a little just in case.

now ya got me thinking... I better seal all holes, a tiny bit of hydrogen make considerable BOOM!
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Old 08-14-2016, 10:28 PM   #10
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hmmm...

now ya got me thinking... I better seal all holes, a tiny bit of hydrogen make considerable BOOM!
You could always name your skoolie Hindenburg!
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