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Old 04-28-2016, 12:26 PM   #41
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I was just thinking: when looking for a fuel-based way to produce electricity, compared to an alternator would it make more sense to install a self contained generator? To charge a 1000Ah battery bank @ 50% SOC with 100A would take 3-4 hours to get to 80% then probably another 4 hours to get to 100% SOC. That's between 3-8 hours of idling the bus engine. I think the general consensus is that cold idling adds a good bit of wear to the big diesel engines. I wonder how long it would be until the cost of diesel + engine wear + accelerated oil changes + new alternator would equate to a decent generator.. I think the hard part would be finding a powerful enough battery charger that will run off of a generator. Anyone care to chime in with their solutions?
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Old 04-28-2016, 12:41 PM   #42
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Electric forklift battery chargers. They come in differing voltage setups, usually between 24 and 48v. Made to charge a forklift battery overnight.
In honesty an electric pallet jack charger should work very well on most house batteries.
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Old 04-28-2016, 12:50 PM   #43
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Electric forklift battery chargers. They come in differing voltage setups, usually between 24 and 48v. Made to charge a forklift battery overnight.
In honesty an electric pallet jack charger should work very well on most house batteries.
Very nice! I wouldn't have thought of a forklift charger.

^ This one puts out 100A @ 12VDC while drawing ~10A @ 240VAC. A 3000 watt generator should be able to run that reasonably well. A steep price tag, though. $1175. hmmm..

Another option might be a 4HP engine (or thereabouts) to power a 100 amp alternator.
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Old 04-28-2016, 01:07 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by jazty View Post
I was just thinking: when looking for a fuel-based way to produce electricity, compared to an alternator would it make more sense to install a self contained generator? To charge a 1000Ah battery bank @ 50% SOC with 100A would take 3-4 hours to get to 80% then probably another 4 hours to get to 100% SOC. That's between 3-8 hours of idling the bus engine. I think the general consensus is that cold idling adds a good bit of wear to the big diesel engines. I wonder how long it would be until the cost of diesel + engine wear + accelerated oil changes + new alternator would equate to a decent generator.. I think the hard part would be finding a powerful enough battery charger that will run off of a generator. Anyone care to chime in with their solutions?
You are correct again. In my situation, I won't be cold idling unless it's an emergency. I do not plan to be off grid unless I am driving somewhere, henceforth the HO alternator route is best for me.
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Old 04-28-2016, 01:20 PM   #45
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Industrial battery chargers

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazty View Post
Very nice! I wouldn't have thought of a forklift charger.

^ This one puts out 100A @ 12VDC while drawing ~10A @ 240VAC. A 3000 watt generator should be able to run that reasonably well. A steep price tag, though. $1175. hmmm..

Another option might be a 4HP engine (or thereabouts) to power a 100 amp alternator.
Well, just like we do not buy brand new buses I'd suggest you don't buy a brand new forklift charger. The Public Surplus auctions, as well as GovLiquidation and others occasionally sell electric pallet jacks with a charger for in the neighborhood of 10%, or less, the price of a new charger.

I love the idea of a HO alternator with a small gas motor. Interestingly that's what the DOT seems to be doing with those electronic street message signs on trailers in construction zones.

Also concerning the HO alternators, that could be an excellent way to generate power from a moving water source.
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Old 04-28-2016, 01:42 PM   #46
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Well, just like we do not buy brand new buses I'd suggest you don't buy a brand new forklift charger. The Public Surplus auctions, as well as GovLiquidation and others occasionally sell electric pallet jacks with a charger for in the neighborhood of 10%, or less, the price of a new charger.

I love the idea of a HO alternator with a small gas motor. Interestingly that's what the DOT seems to be doing with those electronic street message signs on trailers in construction zones.

Also concerning the HO alternators, that could be an excellent way to generate power from a moving water source.

thats what the semi trucks are using.. they call them APU's... Proheat by carrier, tripac by thermoking are a couple.. they come with a HIGH price tag but most have a 12 volt alternator and a 120 volt generator on them.. some are water cooled so you can connect them into your bus heatig system and get heat from them.. others are air cooled and you get heat by using electricity..

most of them generate enough power to run a single 12,000 BTU A/C..

they are usually 2 cylinder diesel engines..

-Christopher
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Old 04-28-2016, 03:07 PM   #47
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I would kill for a heated floor.
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Old 04-28-2016, 04:13 PM   #48
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If you will work off the list of politicians and candidates I send you...we may be able to work something out for your floor.
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Old 04-28-2016, 04:48 PM   #49
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That's enticing. It's something that needs done anyway.
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